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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I mentioned a peculiarity I found in upgrading from the Flux to an RFX with an All Mountain 1 up front.

-The bike is heavier, yet doesn't feel its weight.
-I am making climbs of greater gradient and duration with less fatigue (feels easier)
-I am making my climbs faster, as I'm more comfortable with hammering now.

My question is if there's any such thing as a "pedaling sweetspot"?

I used to climb on my Flux slow and steady. I wasn't comfortable with hammering on the pedals and the bike being so responsive, believe it or not. I would hammer and run out of speed, or need to upshift often. Sometimes not finding the right gear. I find myself being more comfortable on the RFX, so far as to hammer on the pedals. My riding partner noticed my speed difference as well. Traction is phenomenal, but it also seems I'm exerting more power all the time than with the Flux. This is more comfortable, but less fatiguing at the same time. Completely counterintuitive, but it is seeming more and more to be the case as I ride the RFX more and more.

Has anyone else felt this sensation?
 

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I felt the same thing when I went from the Spot to the RFX.

Then it went away.

Honestly, I think you just have a great case of The New Bike Buzz!

Not that there's anything wrong with that. ;)
 

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I noticed the same thing between my Spot and Pack!

I thought that it might be the heavier bike reacting less to the pedal strokes allowing the Pack to feel more stable. If I had known before, I would have only gotten the Pack.

As it stands now, every time I ride, I need to have mini debate with myself as to which bike I should be riding:madman:
 

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It may depend on the terrain, and shock.
I found choppy technical climbing easier on my DHX-C equipped RFX than my RP3 equipped Spot.

Example: "Ned's Left Lung" on Blue Mt is my personal benchmark for climbing because it's a steep choppy sketchy long arsed rock garden. Just getting past the first 1/4 is the biggest challenge for me...the rest is just a matter of not dying. Timing both bikes I found I can do the same time on my 37# RFX as my 31# Spot (same wheels and tires) BUT it's a boatload easier to clean the climb on the RFX as I'm not finessing and wrangling it over every fist and toaster sized rock and trying to keep it from slipping.

I also felt the Spot climbed Neds much akin to the RFX when it had the DHX-C bolted on.
In short a more compliant ride is easier to climb on choppy traction challanged terrain.

OTOH a longer smoother climb (like the back fireroads at Sprain) I'm sure the lighter firmer bike would pull away.
 

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Will we see Kabush on an RFX soon?

Like you say it seems counter intuitive that an RFX would climb bvetter than a Flux - and everyone I know that went from a Spot to an RFX says the Spot climbs better - It must be the terrain - or the rear shock - or both you are riding .......surely?
 

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I heard Kabush will be using a Highline

I'm convinced it is the terrain and the shock. For sustained, steady effort, AEROBIC climbs, a Flux or a lightened Spot with and RP3 is going to feel better and put distance on something like stoutly configured RFX with a DHX.

For me: High-intensity multi-transitional, steep, techy, ANEROBIC climbing, the nod goes to the more compliant ride. If not for the traction, then for all the energy saved not having to wrangle the bike at the same time you're struggling to keep from being stopped cold.
That's my story and I'm sticking to it.

B2B comparison of the DHX-C and RP3 on this kind of terrain.



also Initial DHX thoughts
 

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Bikezilla said:
I'm convinced it is the terrain and the shock. For sustained, steady effort, AEROBIC climbs, a Flux or a lightened Spot with and RP3 is going to feel better and put distance on something like stoutly configured RFX with a DHX.

For me: High-intensity multi-transitional, steep, techy, ANEROBIC climbing, the nod goes to the more compliant ride. If not for the traction, then for all the energy saved not having to wrangle the bike at the same time you're struggling to keep from being stopped cold.
That's my story and I'm sticking to it.

B2B comparison of the DHX-C and RP3 on this kind of terrain.
Exactamundo! On my favorite, long, technical, rocky, multi-transitional, winter climb (Coyote Cliffs if you're asking), the RFX/CCDB works much better than the Spot/RP3. On a long, 35-mile non-tech xc ride like today, nothing beats Spotty.

The right tool for the right job! :D
 

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Short stem = better tech-climbing?

Yesterday I cleared a technical climb for the first time. I have never been close to making it on previous attempts, and the attempts have been plentiful.

Now I had a 40 mm stem instead of the usual 90 mm and cleared it like it was usual business, what up with that?

This on my 5-Spot.

The increased descending fun was excpected and much appreciated, but I could never dream a shorter stem would make me a better climber?

Perhaps the stars were all aligned yesterday, but I see no point in switching to the XC-stem when not DH-shutteling anymore...
 

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It could be a combination of things. My uneducated guess...
1) More comfortable postion for better/easier leverage on the bike and cranks.
2) Weight shifted slightly rearward for more traction.
3) Front lightened slightly for easier control and less effort lifting the wheel over the steps and chunck.


#3 is my favorite. I never lower my fork on a techy climb because it's easier to pop the wheel up and over stuff that would otherwise drain momentum. This way I can pick the best overall line rather than switchback my way up, or put tons of effort into repeatedly yanking the front end up while struggling to keep the cranks turning.

But I still run out of gas way too easily.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I tend to think there is a pedaling sweetspot, especially when taking the individual genetics and physiology of muscle structure. I remember reading an article where Lance's pedaling power and torque was analyzed and he was found to be more efficient using higher gears for the same speed than his closest competitor.
 

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Jerk_Chicken said:
I mentioned a peculiarity I found in upgrading from the Flux to an RFX with an All Mountain 1 up front.

-The bike is heavier, yet doesn't feel its weight.
-I am making climbs of greater gradient and duration with less fatigue (feels easier)
-I am making my climbs faster, as I'm more comfortable with hammering now.

My question is if there's any such thing as a "pedaling sweetspot"?

I used to climb on my Flux slow and steady. I wasn't comfortable with hammering on the pedals and the bike being so responsive, believe it or not. I would hammer and run out of speed, or need to upshift often. Sometimes not finding the right gear. I find myself being more comfortable on the RFX, so far as to hammer on the pedals. My riding partner noticed my speed difference as well. Traction is phenomenal, but it also seems I'm exerting more power all the time than with the Flux. This is more comfortable, but less fatiguing at the same time. Completely counterintuitive, but it is seeming more and more to be the case as I ride the RFX more and more.

Has anyone else felt this sensation?
"New-bikeitis"
 

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transfer of power

Interesting topic. I think it mainly depends on you and where your strengths lie. I will add this though: I went from a medium to large spot and felt like it was an improvement on climbs in terms of the front staying put and not wandering. I prefer to climb in a gear higher than my friends usually, and if I get out of the saddle occaasionally the higher gear gives me better burst. I don't like to "spin" as much. I also tried leaving my saddle about an inch an a half lower than I traditionally have for years and feel like I am getting more contribution from my stomache muscles and quads this way. Anything above an inch and a half higher and I can tell my power/sweet spot is diminishing. BTW, the large is better all around for me.
 
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