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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I want to change my pedals, but would like some clarification between these three styles" Clip, Flat, Slip-ons". Plus and negative comparrisons. I'm 53 so will not be doing any jumping, but do a lot of gravel roads, atv trails, and a bit of mountain climbing.
Have to admit though that I have a tendancy at the moment towards the " Easton Flatboy and Specialized LoProMag 2". If this is the way to go which one.
 

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Well I can't say anything about the Flatboy from experience, but I have heard they are a good pedal. I have ridden the LoPros for just over a year and they're a great pedal. What I liked was the concave shape of the pedal body, f-ing fantastic grip in all conditions, nice weight and they look cool. What I did'nt like about them was that the I got to the point where I had to re-build them too often. Too often for me is after every couple of rides. There was a lot of side to side play which was (I assume) was due a shot o-ring and bearings etc. Other than that (rebuilding) I loved riding em'. If you can find them for a good price I would recommend them, plus I am pretty sure they are a bit less than the Eastons.

Ride safe!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I just got my new bike and have the "Shimano M505 ATB clipless pedals", but don't have the proper shoes for them, That's why I was thinking of going for either the Flatboy's or LoProMag's. I don't have any experiance with clipless pedals, but heard that you have a lot of control with them, am a little uncomfortable with them at the moment. They are a lot smaller than flats.
I was thinking after to get some bike shoes like the "Adidas El Moro or Specialized BG Taho mtb" to see how I like it or not with the clipless pedals. I think it would be the wisest thing to do, since I need some bike shoes anyways.
Still have to say that I am attracted to the two flat models. The clipless at the moment, well are just so foreign to me.
I just heard today that the LoProMag's have been improved, but still have an issue with the seals wearing out and needing replacing, but hey.
 

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Your riding style makes a big difference in what you will like better. I prefer clipless, I ride XC. That means your typical up and down trails and fire roads, no jumping or Mountain Dew commercial stuff. If your rides will be more than acouple miles long and you ride similarly, I would suggest finding some nice SPD clipless shoes and converting. THere is a learning curve for adjusting to having your feet clipped in and figuring out the releasing motion. THere are many threads on this, but it basically comes to practice in the soft grass and have it down before taking it to the trail (or city streets!). THe clipless system works terriffic, just like you have heard the control is great and you get a great increase in pedaling efficiency. It does not feel like it must to you now with regular shoes and the small clipless pedals. The proper shoes will have a very rigid sole and basically become your pedal once clipped in.
 

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I don't know anything about the Flatboys or Specialized (other than I tried to buy a pair and couldn't find them) but I have been back and forth between flats and clipless pedals recently. It's all about how you ride, like someone said above. I now switch pedals based on how I'm planning on riding.. If I'm going out for a trail ride in a XC style, I'll put the clipless on because the gained efficiency is huge, particularly on my SS. If I'm planning on walking hills and just going downhill or just messing around in general, I'll use flats in case I decide to do something stupid and want the extra insurance of riding on flats. I've currently got NYC Freeride flat pedals on my freeride bike and I switch between Sun Ringle ZuZu's and Eggbeaters on my hardtail.

I'd say buy both styles and try them out, you could always sell them but it's nice to have options.
 

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Just get some shoes so you can use your SPD pedals. Clipless is fantastic for all kinds of riding. It keeps your feet on the pedals so you can control the bike. Cliping out is very easy and quickly becomes second nature. Unless you do a lot of walking when you ride I say go clipless. The special clipless pedal shoes are not real good for walking.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks all for the advise. I will definitly get the shoes first, especialy since I don't have any. They will also be shoes that I can walk with. I have narrowed my shoe selection down to three models "Specialized BG Taho MTB, Adidas El Moro, or the Adidas El Moro Mid". I like all three and they all have the right size's. Now the hard part is to choose. As for pedals, well a guy I work with is supposed to give me a pair of flats, which I will compare with, but only after I get used to wearing clips.
 

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The shoes that walk good are more casual and don't have the stiff soles that are good for pedaling

Only way to chose between shoes is to try them on and see how they fit. Many bike shoes have tight toe areas and are painfull for me, but everybody is different so try before you buy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Maida7 said:
The shoes that walk good are more casual and don't have the stiff soles that are good for pedaling

Only way to chose between shoes is to try them on and see how they fit. Many bike shoes have tight toe areas and are painfull for me, but everybody is different so try before you buy.
Sadly:sad: I don't have that luxery, since I am 1,000 miles north of the closest store. I have checked for width, which is important, but thanks for mentioning the toe area. My shoe size is 10.5. I wonder if it wouldn't be better to go to size 11 becuase of the toe area.???
 

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Inukshuk said:
Sadly:sad: I don't have that luxery, since I am 1,000 miles north of the closest store. I have checked for width, which is important, but thanks for mentioning the toe area. My shoe size is 10.5. I wonder if it wouldn't be better to go to size 11 becuase of the toe area.???
that really sucks that you can't try on different pairs. with bike shoes, you are going for a very snug fit to eliminate any sloshing around of your foot inside the shoe. Your shoe/pedal junction is your connection between the engine and the drive train, so any slop will only cause parts to wear out faster (blisters and other foot pains) and take away from pedaling efficiency (which is one of the mains benefits of this technology). I wear a shoe size 9.5, but I went with a size 9 bike shoe with this in mind.

Like someone else mentioned, the shoes that have some compromise in sole stiffness in order to facilitate more comfortable walking are just that, a compromise. The stiffer the sole of the shoe, the better job it does at becoming the pedal surface when clipped in.

Pick up some cycling socks when you get new shoes, too. It may seem silly to spend $10 or whatever on a pair of socks when a pair of cotton socks will do. But cycling socks are much thinner and supported and vented in the right areas. And they look so cool. ;-)
 

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I just thought of you being up north, too. You may have the temptation to get a larger shoe so you can fit warm socks in them. I would avoid this based on the same logic as my post above. They make booties that go over the outside of your cycling shoes for warmth. Cycling shoes tend to be well ventilated, which really works against you when the temp drops! they also make some wool cycling socks that are thin, but I have never tried them. Just another thing to keep in mind.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
ewarnerusa

I've always wore heavy socks even in the summer for as far back as I can remember, but will keep in mind what you've mentioned. Now for shoe size, I believe I've been saved. The guy I am dealing with at the store happened to be size 11 a bit wide and tried the shoe I'm interested "Specialized BG Taho MTB" in size 45 while I was on the phone and he was okay, so we both agreed that the size 44 should be okay for me. Order is made.
 
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