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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Background: After 2-3 attempts at patching the sidewalls, I think I finally got it right. Here is an interim report, after 2-3 months of riding (maybe 12 rides) on all kinds of trails including the hardest local DH run. This tire, Schwalbe Nobby Nic 2.25 UST, was on my Intense 5.5. The tire itself is about 4 months old, and I tore up the sidewall on a steep rocky trail. The tear was on the middle of the sidewall, about 1/4 inch long. Stan's didn't seal it up.

Previous attempts:
- Gorilla glue or Krazy glue on the surface: lasted one ride
- Inner tubes with rubber glue: ballooned out because it is too thin
- Patch kit: ballooned out

Required Materials/Tools:
- Old tire with strong sidewalls
- Rubber glue from a patch kit
- Sandpaper
- Heat gun or hair dryer
- Krazy glue
- Automotive brake cleaner (or isopropyl alcohol)
- Vice and/or Clamp

Directions:
1. Cut out a decent sized oval piece from an old tire. Larger the tear, bigger and thicker the piece has to be. Make sure the surface is clean and without any ridges or visible imperfections. I used a downhill tire, but I would have used an old UST tire if I had one nearby.

2. Sand the outer surface of the cutout piece. Sand it well. You want it clean and abrasive. You want the outer surface because it has the right concave shape. Sand the inner surface of the tire where the tear is located.

3. Soak both surfaces with brake cleaner. Wipe away debris with a clean rag. Use the brake cleaner again. Don't touch it with your fingers or anything dirty. After letting it dry a little, use the dryer for a minute or so to completely dry it.

4. Apply rubber glue liberally to both surfaces. Use the dryer a little, and then attach the cutout piece to the inner surface of the tire.

5. Use the vice (or clamp) over the area, letting it dry for a couple of hours.

6. When you examine the area now, you will see that the middle of the cutout piece is secured, but the edges are not fully attached. This is where Krazy glue comes in. Use it around the edges, making sure that the glue goes inside between the edges. Clamp or push the edges firmly into the sidwall, all the way around, to make sure that the bonding takes place. Krazy glue dries quickly so you should do this within seconds.

7. Let it dry for a couple of days.

8. All done. Mount it up and go for a ride.

I will post an update to let you know how long this fix lasts.
 

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Commit or eat sh!t
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
eckstar said:
Or just buy 2 tires with stronger sidewalls for the price of one NN ;)
Seriously, if you know of UST tires w/ strong sidewalls and of decent width like 2.25, let me know. The one that held up the best so far for me is Albert/Fat Albert. I don't want to put a heavy (probably at least 200-400 grams or more) downhill UST tire like Maxxis High Roller or Minion or Michelin's on a trail bike.
 

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Commit or eat sh!t
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
eckstar said:
It's been my experience that Maxxis tires run a size smaller than stated, other than the newer offerings. High Roller UST 2.5 (probably equivalent to 2.35 Nevegal) weighs a whopping 1300 grams, more suited to a DH bike. High Roller UST 2.3 is more like 2.1 but light enough, and that may be the way to go if you want to stick with Maxxis (but since 2.3 is single ply, I don't know if it is that much better than other UST tires in terms of sidewall protection).

Never tried Geax, and don't know any shops who carry their UST trail tires.

I still haven't found anything better than Schwalbe Fat Albert/Albert in terms of weight and width.
 

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VEGAN ATHLETE Racing
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I've been playing with this too. Over the last four years the only sidewalls i've significantly cut have been on Schwalbe tires. I cut a WTB tire once.
I have had success by stitching the outside of the cut with super glue and then supergluing the a piece of old tire (after cleaning the inside of the tire to be fixed with alcohol) with super glue. This has been working pretty well for me. The only thing about the superglue is that it is pretty brittle.

I also had a nail go into and through the outer wall (where the rim strip would normally be) and punctured the clean metal. I successfully filled the whole with shoe goo. Been running this for about 9 months now and have been racing it too. Wheel seems strong and is hold air like it originally did.
 
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