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I have a nice older steel road bike frame (70s or 80s Italian) that I think might be fun as a fixed SS. It has long Campy forward facing rear dropouts. I'm looking for suggestions for a parts list: bars, brakes, rims, hubs, front fork, cranks.
Cranks: has Shimano 600 on it now.
Bars: I have some japanese make (Sekine) drop bars from the 80s kicking around.
Hubs: what are my choices in a combination fixed/free hub, besides Surly?. Not sure I want to start out fully fixed.
Brakes: front only or front and rear? What is a good choice these days?
Front fork: current is a stiff aluminium that I don't feel comfortable riding because I don't know its age or real condition, and its ugly yellow. Has to be a threaded 1 inch steerer of course. Any suggestions in steel or carbon?

Thanks in advance
 

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One thing...

hu-man said:
I have a nice older steel road bike frame (70s or 80s Italian) that I think might be fun as a fixed SS. It has long Campy forward facing rear dropouts. I'm looking for suggestions for a parts list: bars, brakes, rims, hubs, front fork, cranks.
Cranks: has Shimano 600 on it now.
Bars: I have some japanese make (Sekine) drop bars from the 80s kicking around.
Hubs: what are my choices in a combination fixed/free hub, besides Surly?. Not sure I want to start out fully fixed.
Brakes: front only or front and rear? What is a good choice these days?
Front fork: current is a stiff aluminium that I don't feel comfortable riding because I don't know its age or real condition, and its ugly yellow. Has to be a threaded 1 inch steerer of course. Any suggestions in steel or carbon?

Thanks in advance
Lotta questions there but one stands out. Brakes: if you're gonna run flip-flop and run a freewheel you'll probably want both front and rear brakes. Lots of fixed riders leave the back brake off 'cause your legs act as a brake on the rear wheel. That's not the case with a freewheel.

I'm running Shimano 600 cranks on my fixie and they work fine for me. Bars are really a personal preference thing. Run whatever works for you. If the 80's steel drops fit and are comfortable go for it.

As for your other questions, I know there are several fixie riders here, but you might also try the fixed gear forum over at roadbikereview.com?

Good luck with your project!

-Trevor
 

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Tektro make a pretty keenly priced brakset or go for one of the low end Shimano sets, Sora or Tiagra.
As for hubs, one of the nicest sets are the GoldTec hubs, but these are likely to be expensive in the US. Why not try IRO, they make a nice looking large flange hubset.
The Miche track sprocket set is really cool, a carrier screws onto the hub and then splined sprockets slip onto the carrier and are locked in place with the lockring. The advantage is that the lockring is easier to remove than a sprocket so gear changes are easy. The sprockets are available separately and cheaper than a single sprocket.
Again these are cheap in the UK, not sure about the US.
For ref: I paid £53 for the rear Goldtec hub and £9 for the Miche carrier and one sprocket. Another sprocket is about £8, not sure of the initial pricing policy, might have been a mistake in the shop!!
I would go straight for fixed if I were you, it's not so different from riding singlespeed, except for the bit about not coasting. If you gear high (around 70") you are less likely to try to coast.
 

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I recently did a fixed gear conversion and I'll share some of my experiences.

The bars/stem/seatpost/etc. are all personal preference items, just use what you want. I have a Lemond steel frame with a matching lemond carbon fork so I use that. I use Shimano Sora cranks which work just fine and are below the 600s in the Shimano heirarchy so yours should be fine. For wheels I use Suzue track hubs spaced out for a road frame laced to some Alex rims. They are okay but I am honestly kind of disappointed in the hubs. They just do not seem to roll that smoothly. They were fairly cheap though and its nothing you notice when you're riding. I've hard the Suzue Pro hubs are a lot better but I can't substantiate. Honestly for my use the standard Suzue's work fine. However, if you want something really nice and can pay a little more Campy Track hubs are out of this world.

When I first built this bike I ran a front and back brake. However, after a month of never even trying the freewheel side of the hub I stripped the freewheel off and ditched the brake. I've never even had the desire to try freewheeling. I would definitely recommend having a good front brake though for riding fixed or front and rear if you are running a freewheel. I use a Shimano 600 dual-pivot front brake. It serves my purposes well and was pretty cheap off of eBay.

As for gearing, I originally ran a 48x16 (3:1) which actually turned out to be a little tall for me because one of the reasons I was building a fixie was to work on my spin so I found 48x18 was a good starting point. That is a matter of personal preference and fitness level though.
 

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Some advice on hubs

The Surly fixed hubs would be a good choice. The Suzue Pro-max SB also have sealed bearings and would be nice, but a little more pricey. The Suzue basic (junior) have loose bearings and while inexpensive, not as smooth and durable as the SB's.

The Miche hubs are reasonable, but they require you to use the special Michel splined cog system. This creates an issue, as the only cogs you will have access to are 14-18t in 1/8" only. Yes, you can screw a normal cog on there, but it leaves a gap between the cog and the hub shoulder. You can fill that gap with a spacer but I managed to explode a lockring and drop my chain that way. You can use that Miche cog on other hubs, but the chainline might not be so good. I think the Suzue or Surly is a better choice. All of these can be re-spaced to 130mm.

-Ginz
 

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fixed gear setup

i shopped around on the net and found a guy(business cycles) who was splitting the f/r hubs in a promax set! he sold me the rear for $75, and the wheel has about a thousand miles on it at this point-never any trouble, smooth like what. it pays to hunt around. i just added moustache bars to my bike (from rivendell) and i have to recommend them-so many comfy hand positions, and a conversation piece, as well.
 

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fixedxgear said:
i shopped around on the net and found a guy(business cycles) who was splitting the f/r hubs in a promax set! he sold me the rear for $75, and the wheel has about a thousand miles on it at this point-never any trouble, smooth like what. it pays to hunt around. i just added moustache bars to my bike (from rivendell) and i have to recommend them-so many comfy hand positions, and a conversation piece, as well.
ive got moustach bars on 5 of my bikes fixed cross,fixed surly1x1,fixed nishiki road,bianchi single speed mtb,cylce speedway bike love them.just got 700c fixed free
wheel set from vandessel wellfare price look ok shrader drilled no machined side wall no biggie for cross bike set $174 delivered
 
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