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I recently bought a Park chain wear indicator tool CC-3 through Amazon. It has wear indicators on each side of the tool, one says .75 and the other 1.0. Not certain which measurement means "replace the chain," I turned to the internet to search. Well now I see that Park has created a NEW chain wear tool (CC-3.2), with wear measurements of .5 and .75.

The description says:
"The CC-3.2 is a 'go-no go' gauge designed to accurately indicate when a chain reaches .5% and .75%, the points at which most chain manufacturers suggest replacement."

However, the description I found for the CC-3 says:
"The CC-3 is a 'Go, No Go' gauge designed to accurately indicate when a chain reaches 0.75% and 1% wear, the point at which most chain manufacturers suggest replacement."

This is the SAME description as the CC-3, just with different wear percentages. So at what point do most chain manufacturers suggest replacement? .5%, .75%, or 1% wear? Is my CC-3 tool obsolete? I just bought it! The Park website no longer has any mention of the CC-3.
 

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Looks like park has changed recommendations.

I have a CC-3 and don't use it. I prefer (as many do) to use a ruler/tape measure to measure 12" from pin to pin.

1/16" over and replace the chain, 1/8" over and you may need to replace the cassette as well.
 

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Can Tree Member
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There are some epic threads on the subject of chain wear indicators. Start here and you will find links to several others a short way down the page. It's all good stuff, very educational if you take the time to wade through it all.

Then you can reach your own decisions about .5 vs. .75 vs. 1.0, wear indicators vs. rulers, and the pros/cons of the different types of wear indicators (since there are obviously different opinions on the subject). Give yourself about 30-40 minutes and 2-3 beers to sort it all out.
 

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1/16" elongation of a chain over 12" of length is 0.52% elongation, or about 0.5%. Good time to replace your chain.

1/8" elongation of a chain over 12" of length is 1.04% elongation, or about 1.0%. If you've waited this long, it is probably time to replace your cassette as well as your chain.

The only variable in using the chain checker to measure is whether the rollers wear more quickly than the pins in a chain or not. One could usually use something like the CC-3, and if you see a 0.5% of wear indication then double check it with a ruler. Just try not to procrastinate in replacing your chain.
 

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Afric Pepperbird
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Sorry to resurrect this old thread, but to answer the OP's question, the .5% is the recommended replacement for 11 speed bikes.

Now, I too have the cc-3.2, and am wondering if it's prudent to change my 9 speed Sram chain when it gets to .5%? Most recommend it's okay to wait until .75%, but I want to avoid needing to replace my cassette whenever possible. I'd love to get 3-4 chains for every cassette (I use Shimano XT cassette).

Is changing once it hits .5% overkill?

Thanks in advance.
 

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There are some epic threads on the subject of chain wear indicators. Start here and you will find links to several others a short way down the page. It's all good stuff, very educational if you take the time to wade through it all.

Then you can reach your own decisions about .5 vs. .75 vs. 1.0, wear indicators vs. rulers, and the pros/cons of the different types of wear indicators (since there are obviously different opinions on the subject). Give yourself about 30-40 minutes and 2-3 beers to sort it all out.
Sorry to resurrect this old thread, but to answer the OP's question, the .5% is the recommended replacement for 11 speed bikes.

Now, I too have the cc-3.2, and am wondering if it's prudent to change my 9 speed Sram chain when it gets to .5%? Most recommend it's okay to wait until .75%, but I want to avoid needing to replace my cassette whenever possible. I'd love to get 3-4 chains for every cassette (I use Shimano XT cassette).

Is changing once it hits .5% overkill?

Thanks in advance.
Take a look at post I quoted and follow the link which was suggested..

It goes into discussion on the park tool chain checkers, It led me to this thread http://forums.mtbr.com/tooltime/chain-wear-checker-anyone-689022.html and this link http://pardo.net/bike/pic/fail-004/000.html

and this thread http://forums.mtbr.com/tooltime/wear-indicator-tool-215824.html

Happy Reading.
 

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Afric Pepperbird
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Take a look at post I quoted and follow the link which was suggested..

It goes into discussion on the park tool chain checkers, It led me to this thread http://forums.mtbr.com/tooltime/chain-wear-checker-anyone-689022.html and this link http://pardo.net/bike/pic/fail-004/000.html

and this thread http://forums.mtbr.com/tooltime/wear-indicator-tool-215824.html

Happy Reading.
I did read all of your links, and with all due respect, they are completely different from my question.

So, again, assuming one wants to use a .5% - .75% Park tool (the cc-3.2), instead of a ruler or homemade thingamajig, is changing chains at .5% overkill, in regards cassette life?
 

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I use the CC3 measure the chain in 4 or 5 places if one of them is 0.75% I'll take the chain of and measure with a ruler then if it is generally at / or approaching 0.75% rather than just the odd link I'll change the chain (on both 9 and 10 speed) I get 4 or 5 chains per cassette, so see no reason to change - to me 0.5 % is overkill I read somewhere (on here I think) that people had found that a new chain was already at 0.5% when they checked it.
 

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I did read all of your links, and with all due respect, they are completely different from my question.

So, again, assuming one wants to use a .5% - .75% Park tool (the cc-3.2), instead of a ruler or homemade thingamajig, is changing chains at .5% overkill, in regards cassette life?
They arent different, if you read them youll find the common thought on using the Park tool type chain checkers are completely inaccurate due to the way theyre designed to measure the chain...
 

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Afric Pepperbird
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I use the CC3 measure the chain in 4 or 5 places if one of them is 0.75% I'll take the chain of and measure with a ruler then if it is generally at / or approaching 0.75% rather than just the odd link I'll change the chain (on both 9 and 10 speed) I get 4 or 5 chains per cassette, so see no reason to change - to me 0.5 % is overkill I read somewhere (on here I think) that people had found that a new chain was already at 0.5% when they checked it.
Thanks, SJ, this is what I needed to see. :thumbsup:
 

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psycho cyclo addict
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I use the CC3 measure the chain in 4 or 5 places if one of them is 0.75% I'll take the chain of and measure with a ruler then if it is generally at / or approaching 0.75% rather than just the odd link I'll change the chain (on both 9 and 10 speed) I get 4 or 5 chains per cassette, so see no reason to change - to me 0.5 % is overkill I read somewhere (on here I think) that people had found that a new chain was already at 0.5% when they checked it.
+1 though I use the CC-2 tool; new one goes on when I get ~.65 reading.

In my experience, XT and XTR 9-speed chains (running on two of my 29er's with XTR cassettes and different sets of chain rings that have over 4,000 miles combined on them) hit .5 on the CC-2 relatively quickly. The time it takes to even approach .75 (my interpolated .65 if you will) is significantly longer.

One thing to consider is that modern chains are manufactured to tighter tolerances so changing them closer to .5 is not all that bad of an idea. Your mileage may vary depending on how frequently you lube your chain, clean it, the condition of the trails, the topology, how hard you ride (switch gears, cross chain, etc while mashing up climbs for example) and other things I'm sure :D
 

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I don't think changing at .5 is overkill at all. Chains are cheap, while cassettes, cogs, and chainrings are expensive, and changing at .5 means I maximize the life of all three.
 

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I agree with the philosophy of change the chain to maximise the life of cassettes and rings etc. However one thing I have noticed is that 10 speed chains don't last anywhere near as long as 9 speed ones. I have a 10 speed set mix of 105 / Ultegra on the bike I use for commuting and a few weeknight club rides and using the method detailed above I reckon the chains need replacing every 3000~4000Km, roughly 2/3rds of a 9 speed. I do about 300Km per week on that bike - in the 2.5 years its been set up I've been through 7 or 8 chains 1 cassette and the 105 rings still look brand new. Im not sure of the economics of changing the chain at 0.5% seeing as 10 speed chain $30~$40 - cassette $70-$80 - rings about $40~$50 each. The LBS round the corner only sells Shimano chains, been too lazy to try other brands.
 

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Got a possible dumb question. Can you put a non-SRAM 10 speed chain on a bike with SRAM components? I am sure I am due for a chain change, among other things.
 

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Got a possible dumb question. Can you put a non-SRAM 10 speed chain on a bike with SRAM components? I am sure I am due for a chain change, among other things.
Not a dumb question at all - the answer is yes, no problem. I haven't tried these new assymetric 10 speed shimano Dynasis chains yet so even though they will fit - I can't comment on what the shifting would be like with SRAM rings and cassettes - probably be OK

Interesting point, a friend of mine uses a KMC 10 speed chain with a similar drive train set up to mine he reckons the chains take a lot more Km's to reach 0.75% than Shimano 10 speed chains but are much harder on Shimano alloy cassettes and rings - so maybe they would be worth replacing at 0.5%
 

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I agree with the philosophy of change the chain to maximise the life of cassettes and rings etc. However one thing I have noticed is that 10 speed chains don't last anywhere near as long as 9 speed ones. I have a 10 speed set mix of 105 / Ultegra on the bike I use for commuting and a few weeknight club rides and using the method detailed above I reckon the chains need replacing every 3000~4000Km, roughly 2/3rds of a 9 speed. I do about 300Km per week on that bike - in the 2.5 years its been set up I've been through 7 or 8 chains 1 cassette and the 105 rings still look brand new. Im not sure of the economics of changing the chain at 0.5% seeing as 10 speed chain $30~$40 - cassette $70-$80 - rings about $40~$50 each. The LBS round the corner only sells Shimano chains, been too lazy to try other brands.
Even then, the chain will go from 0.5 to 0.75 a lot faster than it goes from 0.0 to 0.5. The little extra life you can squeeze out of it just isn't worth it wearing your rings/cassette.
 

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Afric Pepperbird
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I don't think changing at .5 is overkill at all. Chains are cheap, while cassettes, cogs, and chainrings are expensive, and changing at .5 means I maximize the life of all three.
To be honest, this is what I really wanted to hear! I use the cheap Sram 951, which I clean and lube religiously. It'll never get the chance to rust the way I baby it, and at only $20 a pop, I think it's worth replacing at .5%.
 

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Even then, the chain will go from 0.5 to 0.75 a lot faster than it goes from 0.0 to 0.5. The little extra life you can squeeze out of it just isn't worth it wearing your rings/cassette.
Thanks for the heads up - Next time I change the chain I'll keep an eye on how long it takes to reach 0.5% and if it is only a few 100 km less it is worth changing then.
 

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Have you guys ever checked a new chain? The large majority I have checked will register .5 on the park tools when brand new. So changing them based on this reading is kind of silly.

Park will even tell you that new chains read at about .5.

I hate when I hire a new mechanic and he wants to replace every chain at .5% on the park. It means he has very little real world experience.
 
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