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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anybody intersted in the Paleo Diet for athletes? I read the book and am now following the diet. It is really tough! I miss cookies. Anybody else out there feelin me?
 

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I tried the diet for a while and just couldn't truly stick with it. I believe the general rule was "if you can't pick it or kill it, don't eat it". Preparing the meat was more work than I wanted to do sometimes. I just bought a big slab of salmon and a huge package of chicken breast, so hopefully that will get me back in the habit.

At the moment, I'm just counting calories and sticking to relatively healthy foods (lots of fruits and veggies). No fast food, sodas, chips, cookies, etc.

Still eat some processed foods (yogurt, pop-tarts, and meal replacement bars) that are somewhat healthy and low-calorie, but easy to eat when hunger arrives. I still stick to 2000-2200 calories a day. Healthy amount of calories for 5'10", 166 pounds
 

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flankwood said:
Anybody intersted in the Paleo Diet for athletes? I read the book and am now following the diet. It is really tough! I miss cookies. Anybody else out there feelin me?
Yep I follow it pretty dilligently and have been for about 4 years. When I'm on the plan I feel great and when I fall off it I don't feel quite so sparkly. When I have a big race coming up I am always on the Paleo plan. You can eat sugary stuff while riding - I eat cookies and chocolate as ride fuel sometimes :)
 

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I am with Lynda. I adhere to the Paleo diet pretty strictly, and have noticed a big improvement in a couple of areas:

- More energy (no more lag times during the day)
- Quicker recovery, I can go hard day, after day, after day...
- I don't get sick. Period. Haven't been sick since I started the diet last year, and I am a cube worker :/ (that is soon to change though)
- When I eat "normal" food, I feel like poop, bad poop. No energy, no motivation.

Keep in mind, I get 8 hours of sleep every night, drink one glass of wine a night, and am 23. So, I am sure some of my good fortune is non-Paleo related. Yep, pretty boring for my age range, but hey, winning is the exciting part, right? :thumbsup:

However, I do have a sweet tooth. I haven't been able to get rid of my chocolate addiction...
 

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I started in early Nov. after reading the original book. The athlete book just made me organize my eating around what little training I can get in. ie - the simpler carbs during and after training rides/runs etc.

I am dropping weight since I started really following the diet Jan 1, and also noticed that my typical morning joint stiffness is gone.

I miss the dairy, potatoes, pasta and rice. But the weight has been worth it. :)

Good luck following the plan, and remember he does suggest simple carbs during and after exercise. With that in mind you can justify plain low salt potatoe chips in small batches. ;)

Stosh
 

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Sounds interesting but I'm not sure I could give up ice cream altogether. It is my greatest weakness. :)
 

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I have been following Rob Faigin's Natural Hormonal Enhancement for a few years with good results, including outstanding lab values for LDL/HDL cholesterol and lipids. On the surface, it sounds similar to the Paleo diet. Although I don't race bikes anymore and couldn't test it myself, one concern I had with NHE was its utility for power/endurance sports. I still ride aggressively and train for fitness and health. It's encouraging to hear MTB racers use what (on the surface) looks like a similar diet modified slightly during rides. I'll have to get the book. Has anyone read both?

Larry
 

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Can anyone gve the gist of the diet? Sounds a bit like what my doc had suggested last year at my physical - lots of ground produce and lean meat. Sadly I like my pasta, rice, bread, milk, chocolate etc and have trouble keeping weight on so basically have to try to eat whatever helps keep it on. I have tried to get in more ground produce type foods and eat oatmeal and now Oatibix on a regular basis.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
The problem is most people believe starches to be rich in certain vitamins or fiber etc. But the truth is , pound for pound, veggies and fruits are much better. Go to this link to get an interesting view of the diet: http://www.earth360.com/diet_paleodiet_balzer.html It is very difficult to follow. I am going to ease into it slowly. That means increase the goos stuff and slowly tapper off the bad.
 

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Humans ate Paleo-style thousands of years ago. Our biology and psychology has changed since then. Eating unadulterated foods sounds right. I believe in seasonal, local foods.
 

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LyNx said:
Can anyone gve the gist of the diet? Sounds a bit like what my doc had suggested last year at my physical - lots of ground produce and lean meat. Sadly I like my pasta, rice, bread, milk, chocolate etc and have trouble keeping weight on so basically have to try to eat whatever helps keep it on. I have tried to get in more ground produce type foods and eat oatmeal and now Oatibix on a regular basis.
The gist is that it's a diet of lean meats, veggies, fruits & nuts. Exclusions include breads, pastas, sugars, rice and other grains, beans, etc. Think of it as the caveman diet. Before eating something, ask yourself if it's something that the caveman would have had at his disposal.
 

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Starting to make sense to me.

cgee said:
Our biology and psychology has changed since then. Eating unadulterated foods sounds right. I believe in seasonal, local foods.
Actually, I doubt if human biology hasn't changed in hundreds of thousands of years. Seems the majority of 'diseases of consumption' are directly related to the very foods the Paleo Diet has on the 'do not eat list.'

I am hugely in favor of eating local, seasonal foods, too!

I think I will go out and grab the Paleo Diet for Athletes book, to see how it works.
 

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flankwood said:
Have you ever eaten uncooked beans? Not too appatizing plus toxic. Check out the Paeo website for a detailed explanation.
Hold on a minute. Just because humans can't metabolize beans without breaking down the cellulose by cooking doesn't make them "toxic" btw. After all you cook meat to help improve its nutritional value, don't you, not to mention tastier? And why would early people cook meat and not anything else?

I read quite a few of the links on that page with interest as I have a background in anthropology and human evolution. One of the first links on that page (Introduction to the Paleolithic diet) has a number of grievious inaccuracies. It states that cooking started 10,000 years ago. Actually fire has been a part of human evolution and started with H0mo erectus approximately 1.8 million years ago. Modern humans evolved, with cooking, 250,00 - 300,000 years ago. There are plenty of artifacts that date to cooking prior to 10,000 years ago. The one thing that did change 10,000 years ago was agriculture (and there is no doubt that that began the slippery slope of human dietary decline). But if you think that early humans survived without eating starchy roots and wild legumes or corn, then that is simply not true (although not in the massive agriculturally selected varieties we see today). Potatoes are roots and a huge componet of hunter gatherer diets are root & tuber based.

That page also linked to this well written article which had valid references and stated the following:

"CAVEMAN CUISINE"

Using the methods of research described here, archaeological and paleontological evidence, ethnographic studies of living hunting and gathering people, and the nutritional analysis of wild plant and animal food, Eaton and Konner (1985) reconstructed the diet of Paleolithic people living during the last glacial period in western Europe, about 15,000 years ago. Garn and Leonard (1989) point out that this diet was not typical of the majority of people alive at that time. The majority lived at tropical or subtropical latitudes and consumed more wild grains and less animal meat-recall Schoeninger's (1982) analysis of Paleolithic diets from Israel. Garn and Leonard state that "many of our ancestors ate poorly,. . . and they were often at risk for vitamin deficiencies, food-borne diseases, and neurotoxins" (1989: 337).

&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&

Sorry to nitpick. Overall I think many of the concepts are based on valid principles, including the condemation of modern cuisine as being too limited in breadtha nd scope of dietary food sources (essentially cow and corn in america). I do admit that it does overall sound like a healthy guideline for eating, although some parts appeared to be contrived on a number of inaccurate assumptions about our evolution.
 

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LyndaW,
4 yrs that is pretty cool. I recently switched to the Paleo Diet for Athletes. I am a big guy so it is the right thing for me to do. I need some help on pre workout/race meals. Any ideas? I don't feel up to snuff on interval sessions. All help appreciated.
 

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In the same vain, I read this (I think really superb) article in the NY Times by the author of "The Omnivore's Dilema". It advocates what i think sounds very similar to the paleo diet in terms of variety, and non-processed/natural, and I think it makes a great case for eating lots of fruits, vegetables, and other natural sources of 'nutrients'. It sort of chases the evolution of the modern nutrition ideology, and pokes a LOT of holes in the current food trends.

If nothing else, it's a great read: http://www.nytimes.com/2007/01/28/magazine/28nutritionism.t.html?ex=1173758400&en=2706a6e66a68eb81&ei=5070
 

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IMHO the book Ultra-Metabolism by Mark Hyman is a similar but much better plan.
Eating fresh unprocessed foods is definitely the way to go, but trying to eat everything raw is just dumb. Cooking improves the bioavailability of nutrients in many foods and goes a long way towards eliminating any pathogens that exist therein.
 
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