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Biking Like Crazy!
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Your bike will be fine. Actually it'll be better than fine with a coil fork IMHO!
I've done that with 2 of my bikes and the small bump compliance is fantastic.
You will constantly be adjusting your rear air shock to try to get it to feel half
as good as the fork. This is all predicated on getting the right spring for your weight though.

Which coil conversion are you going with? they should be able to get you close if not right on. Enjoy!:thumbsup:
 

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Shouldn't be a problem. I tried coil on both ends for a while and settled on coil fork, and air shock. I found that the coil sprung fork is much less finicky with spring rate and settings. The coil shock was more difficult trying to tune for the frame design and to dial in the perfect spring rate. I also felt like the coil shock was just too active for pedaling and robbed some energy. In the end you have a lot riding on the coil shock (literally and figuratively) ... So I sold the coil and went with a linear air shock (CC air IL) and I'm much happier with that combo.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I'll be converting a MRP ribbon air to coil on my Devinci Troy 29". Too much time spent tinkering with the settings and still not finding the consistency I want made me want to give coil a try. Thanks for the feedback
 

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At the rear, the spring rate at the wheel is determined by the varying leverage ratio of the linkage interacting with the spring. The fork is 1:1 all the way through; there's nothing else to influence how the spring and wheel interact. I see no reason to worry about mixing springs if they provide the ride you want.



That said, as a former coil advocate, air springs are very good nowadays. I think they're refined enough that damper behavior is the real driving factor for fork behavior, assuming you've got the air spring set up well. I don't expect a coil spring will provide the change you hope for.
 

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Biking Like Crazy!
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I'll be converting a MRP ribbon air to coil on my Devinci Troy 29". Too much time spent tinkering with the settings and still not finding the consistency I want made me want to give coil a try. Thanks for the feedback
Bingo! ^This!

Besides the small bump compliance I was looking for, the coil also
gave me a consistent sag and ride height as opposed to an air spring
either being to divey if set for a plusher ride or being more harsh
if I tried to get rid of the wallow!
 

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I'll be converting a MRP ribbon air to coil on my Devinci Troy 29". Too much time spent tinkering with the settings and still not finding the consistency I want made me want to give coil a try. Thanks for the feedback
I experienced the same thing with my ribbon air. The separate chambers were nice at first but added too many variables. Also, as a lighter weight rider the 10% difference in neg air spring pressure was a 3-5psi difference, and between plush/negative that is a 1-2 psi difference. I got tired of that real fast and I've been happy with the coil conversion ever since.

At the rear, the spring rate at the wheel is determined by the varying leverage ratio of the linkage interacting with the spring. The fork is 1:1 all the way through; there's nothing else to influence how the spring and wheel interact. I see no reason to worry about mixing springs if they provide the ride you want.

That said, as a former coil advocate, air springs are very good nowadays. I think they're refined enough that damper behavior is the real driving factor for fork behavior, assuming you've got the air spring set up well. I don't expect a coil spring will provide the change you hope for.
Totally agree with all of this. Riding my CC IL coil and IL air back to back I probably couldn't tell a difference. The air has a distinct advantage in that I have much better control of the spring curve (spacers) and can really dial in the spring rate.
 

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Completely depends on the frame kinematics, rider weight, terrain and other factors. Generally (and over simplified) coil will provide more benefit on the back of the bike then the front as the leverage ratio is in play and pressures are higher. This comes with it, increased seal drag and as a result, hysterisis.

I ran an acs3 pike along with a dvo topaz on my sc hightower. being able to adjust the sag and ramp of the back of that bike was helpful as it was very linear and didn't pair well with the frame. The ACS3 pike rc was good, but in reality not as good as my fox 36 grip 2 that I am running now (stock).

IMO, if you're not doing 3-4 lower leg services per year on your fork already, then you'll get more performance out of your fork by decreasing lower leg service intervals then you will swapping to coil.
 

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EDR
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I'm not sure if you're conversion will be "better" or not but I can tell you there's no reason to worry about doing it if that's what you want. I ran coil Pikes and Lyriks on my old Yetis with Fox rp3/rp23 rear for a decade and until seeing this thread never once thought about the mismatch.
 

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Elitest thrill junkie
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I think you will go mad trying to rectify how much better the front end works than the rear. I wouldn’t run coil and air out back, either coil coil, or air coil.
 

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I think you will go mad trying to rectify how much better the front end works than the rear. I wouldn't run coil and air out back, either coil coil, or air coil.
Yeah, I think you're right, it's just such a different spring, linear vs progressive, it'll feel wierd and be practically impossible to sync.

I'm gonna try it myself this weekend, swapping out my Bomber CR Coil for a DPX2, see how different it feels. Got a Bomber Z1/Smashpot up front now.
 

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Rides all the bikes!
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When my coil shock blew, I grabbed the old, worn out, needs service, bottom of the line Monarch off my old bike and bolted it on so I could at least keep riding.

Was it as good as the coil? No.

Can most people tell a difference? I doubt it. Mostly in your head.

Just enjoy your ride, don't worry, you'll be fine with air on the bike (or the front).

I like coil because I can be lazy with my setup. I just have to air my tires and go.
 

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When my coil shock blew, I grabbed the old, worn out, needs service, bottom of the line Monarch off my old bike and bolted it on so I could at least keep riding.

Was it as good as the coil? No.

Can most people tell a difference? I doubt it. Mostly in your head.

Just enjoy your ride, don't worry, you'll be fine with air on the bike (or the front).

I like coil because I can be lazy with my setup. I just have to air my tires and go.
If you couldn´t feel very noticeable difference there was something very wrong going on with the coil shock before the blow out or you have very poor sensitivity to bike related stuff. The difference in stiction and initial sensitivity is day and night kind of difference.
 

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Rides all the bikes!
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If you couldn´t feel very noticeable difference there was something very wrong going on with the coil shock before the blow out or you have very poor sensitivity to bike related stuff. The difference in stiction and initial sensitivity is day and night kind of difference.
Not that there isn't a difference, just that, it's overblown for most though. Example: Local bike park has an enduro trail that is a mix of everything, but very enduro'y (making up that word now). Comparing my old aluminum E29 with entry level components to my new carbon E29 with Ohlins coil front and rear I was 10 seconds faster on a 3:30 (roughly) trail. That matters at a pro level, but to everyone else, it doesn't matter at all. I am in the top 10 out of 3000 something people who've been on that trail, so I'm not exactly on the slower end of the scale.

It's not night and day difference. Your perception says it is, but it's not.
 

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Not that there isn't a difference, just that, it's overblown for most though. Example: Local bike park has an enduro trail that is a mix of everything, but very enduro'y (making up that word now). Comparing my old aluminum E29 with entry level components to my new carbon E29 with Ohlins coil front and rear I was 10 seconds faster on a 3:30 (roughly) trail. That matters at a pro level, but to everyone else, it doesn't matter at all. I am in the top 10 out of 3000 something people who've been on that trail, so I'm not exactly on the slower end of the scale.

It's not night and day difference. Your perception says it is, but it's not.
well time is one thing, feel is the other thing, for some people like you mentioned timing is crucial to make a choice, for others feel is more important and I know pretty well that after day or two in bikepark your body will be able to tell difference between air and coil, coil can absorb small vibrations that are just too small to get air spring to move at all yet cause a lot of microscopic tissue damage to the body. And to get back to the time thing, 3:30 is something I would call short to medium lenght trail, 10 seconds difference is equal to roughly 100m difference at the end of the trail if the average speed is 30kph. Pretty significant if you ask me even when not really racing there is always some competitiveness in most of us and don´t tell me there isn´t lol.
 

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Running Fox 36 up front with smashpot and CC DB Air CS up back.

I actually had a coil shock up back (CC IL Coil) but swapped it out to the air as I needed more progression (19 Stumpy Evo)

If the can is a big volume type (read X2 or DB Air) then it will still have a good amount of small bump that the fork seems to eat for breakfast.

A coil up back with Hydraulic bottom out would be the best option (EXT) but I'm not made of money. They don't make progressive springs in a spring rate that will support my weight yet (I run a 600-650lb to maintain proper sag)
 

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A coil conversion was the single best upgrade I've done in my own fork where friction and spring rate are the 2 most important things to dial in first and a coil ticks both. The excellent grip, support and bump control make it ideal for the fork IMO

I love my CCDB Shock but do occasionally prefer an air shock for certain situations ie jump/flow trails. Can't find a reason not to run the coil fork though!
 
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