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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been a real dumb ass here...
First time bleeding my SRAM Guide RS brakes on my 2019 YT Jeffsy. Everything went great until I decided to use my cheap ass torque wrench to tighten the 4mm hex in the bleeding edge port on the rear caliper to the settings suggested by SRAM. Well low and behold the torque wrench went way to far and I feels like I stripped the hex bolt. can't loosen it anymore....

My rear brake is now bled for the time being but i'm guessing I'm going to be investing in a new rear brake setup before the next bleed comes right? Or does anybody have any great advice to save my ass and my wallet?

:madman::madman::madman:
 

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Quality 4mm hex socket and a ratchet. You'll want to apply downward pressure on the ratchet to help keep it from camming out, then slowly apply torque to see if you can break the screw loose.

You might want to wait until you actually need to open the bleed port to try this. Either the screw will break loose, or it will strip out the head.

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Stripped the hex (rounded it off) or stripped the threads? I don't quiet understand what you mean when you said you "stripped the bolt head", and that you can no longer loosen it.

If the hex is rounded off you may be able to get vice-grip pliers to stay tight enough to loosen the bolt. Probably need to remove caliper from the bike. I it's threads, it should back out, regardless of threads being stripped. If they are stripped, it may be easiest to replace the caliper as running a tap through the threads, if even possible, may leave particles that you will not be able to remove.
Good luck, maybe sooner than later is best to prevent the bolt from becoming gaulded in the threads.


This is a good testament to some of the torque wrench threads. First, torque wrenches are accurate within a specific range, not always are that as accurate at low readings. People continually say "it's a bike and this torque wrench is plenty accurate for just the things I do on a bike"
Also, the handle is longer than some common tools we would use on a bicycle -and we rely on the wrench, not our own feel. Therefore, we can tighten as much as we want as long as the wrench hasn't told me I have gone too far using the little click I'm supposed to get.



It's such a touchy subject and this is a sensitive area too, how tight is too tight for a bleed screw and is a torque wrench really necessary when the accuracy may not be all that accurate.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Stripped the hex (rounded it off) or stripped the threads? I don't quiet understand what you mean when you said you "stripped the bolt head", and that you can no longer loosen it.

If the hex is rounded off you may be able to get vice-grip pliers to stay tight enough to loosen the bolt. Probably need to remove caliper from the bike. I it's threads, it should back out, regardless of threads being stripped. If they are stripped, it may be easiest to replace the caliper as running a tap through the threads, if even possible, may leave particles that you will not be able to remove.
Good luck, maybe sooner than later is best to prevent the bolt from becoming gaulded in the threads.

This is a good testament to some of the torque wrench threads. First, torque wrenches are accurate within a specific range, not always are that as accurate at low readings. People continually say "it's a bike and this torque wrench is plenty accurate for just the things I do on a bike"
Also, the handle is longer than some common tools we would use on a bicycle -and we rely on the wrench, not our own feel. Therefore, we can tighten as much as we want as long as the wrench hasn't told me I have gone too far using the little click I'm supposed to get.

It's such a touchy subject and this is a sensitive area too, how tight is too tight for a bleed screw and is a torque wrench really necessary when the accuracy may not be all that accurate.
I stripped the hex not the thread from what I can tell. The difficulty with this particular screw is that it is of the "bleeding edge" variety so it's recessed into the caliper well beyond the reach of something like vice grips. I'm going to give it a try with with a quality hex. And I was thinking that persuading a torx/star driver into the hex might work.
I've found a service set for the guide RS that includes a new hex screw. That would obviously save a lot of cash and work.

Regarding the torque wrench you're spot on. Turns out the lowest setting on this particular wrench is 2NM so the 1.5NM setting that SRAM specified was not a good idea. Incidentally I tightened the bleed screw in the handle side a(t10) by hand and really didn't go beyond finger tight. That was simply because i don't have a t10 driver for my torque wrench. Go figure.

Anyway, I'll wait and see until I need to bleed the rear brake again before I take action. My guess is that it's going to be a new rear brake. But we'll see. Thanks for the advice!

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I stripped the hex not the thread from what I can tell. The difficulty with this particular screw is that it is of the "bleeding edge" variety so it's recessed into the caliper well beyond the reach of something like vice grips. I'm going to give it a try with with a quality hex. And I was thinking that persuading a torx/star driver into the hex might work.
I've found a service set for the guide RS that includes a new hex screw. That would obviously save a lot of cash and work.

Regarding the torque wrench you're spot on. Turns out the lowest setting on this particular wrench is 2NM so the 1.5NM setting that SRAM specified was not a good idea. Incidentally I tightened the bleed screw in the handle side a(t10) by hand and really didn't go beyond finger tight. That was simply because i don't have a t10 driver for my torque wrench. Go figure.

Anyway, I'll wait and see until I need to bleed the rear brake again before I take action. My guess is that it's going to be a new rear brake. But we'll see. Thanks for the advice!

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Ahh okay. I'm not familiar with the bolt, but I think I understand now. Sounds like a tough situation then. Hopefully there is a way to remove that port. Again, probably good idea to work on it sooner than later. DOT fluid is corrosive and the screw could become stuck in place. Without the proper tool to remove said stuck bolt -the caliper may become all art at the next bleed schedule.
 

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If you can't free it, check with some local machine shops. They have the tools to deal with difficult jobs like this, but it might be cheaper to just buy a replacement caliper used.

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Depending on the bolts location, you may be able to use a slightly different size hex, or even a small Torx to get enough purchase on it to loosen it.

If it doesn't quite fit, but is close (and too large), you can can gently try to "tap" the torx/hex into place. Since most bits are steel, and most of these bolts are aluminum, you may create your own tool imprint, enough to loosen the bolt. You'll have to push into the bolt head heavily while turning for this to work though. I just removed a stripped bottle cage bolt using this method though (using a slightly larger Torx bit than the original hex).

Alternatively, you can borrow, or buy an "EZ Out" tool. Its basically a reverse drill bit, where it bites into the head of the bolt, and helps you get it out (by basically destroying the bolt head). Looks like Harbor freight has a set for $9, while amazon has "real" brands from $11 or so on up. May be worth the investment.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Oops! Well I've tracked down a replacement part.
Now I'm waiting for the moment I need to rebleed. My plan is to use an old torx or small flathead and carefully tap it into the rounded out hex head.
Advantage is that it shouldn't be particularly tight. Hope it will work. Otherwise I'm going to have to replace the brake...

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Good luck indeed. Like mentioned above having a new 4mm and turning very slowly at angle might get some action.

Im pretty peved as i did everytthing else fine

I just have that warbling in the brake. It sounds like bubbling oil but i think its just the calipers on the rotor. Ive had two hire bikes on SRAM before and both did it. Never had it with Shimano. Hate it. Finiicky brakes but great once theyre going
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
For the sake of completing the story:
I got it out just fine.

Ended up using a TX27 bit (that’s a slightly obscure size!) that I tapped in carefully using a small hammer. Then put a 1/4” socket on my ratchet and with quite a bit of inwards pressure slowly extracted it. The kit also came with a replacement o-ring that sits on the hex screw. Didn’t even have to bleed the brakes again!


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For the sake of completing the story:
I got it out just fine.

Ended up using a TX27 bit (that's a slightly obscure size!) that I tapped in carefully using a small hammer. Then put a 1/4" socket on my ratchet and with quite a bit of inwards pressure slowly extracted it. The kit also came with a replacement o-ring that sits on the hex screw. Didn't even have to bleed the brakes again!

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Congratulations!
The bleeding edge tool is a great idea by SRAM but you do have to be careful with re tightening little screws. I never use torque wrench on anything that small. Just has to be good'n snug. Nice that you didn't have to replace whole caliper. Happy riding (and wrenching)!
 

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For the sake of completing the story:
I got it out just fine.

Ended up using a TX27 bit (that's a slightly obscure size!) that I tapped in carefully using a small hammer. Then put a 1/4" socket on my ratchet and with quite a bit of inwards pressure slowly extracted it. The kit also came with a replacement o-ring that sits on the hex screw. Didn't even have to bleed the brakes again!

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I'm having the same problem and I tried your solution and unfortunately it hasn't worked for me. My issue doesn't seem to be a stripped head, but for whatever reason the bleed screw just keeps spinning without backing out. Sounds like others have had the same problem. Has anyone figured out how to get it out?
 
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