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EAT MORE GRIME
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start small, and hit it often. try 1 footers, then 2 footers....etc....


unlike a motorcycle, if you start to nose over in the air you cannot correct it by more throttle, you ded

if you have to make a mistake, try to have the front too high, that can be partly corrected by braking rear wheel
 

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EAT MORE GRIME
(ノಠ益ಠ)ノ彡┻━┻
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Go huge and crash hard, then soak in the fact that you'll (probably) never crash that hard again and there's nothing to be afraid of.
ha that worked for me in my 20's....

nowadays....yikes
 

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I used to hit jumps all wrong, take off at the wrong part…

then I accidentally happened upon a pumptrack 5 minutes from my house. Started going there for 30 minutes before work d a i l y, now at least once a week. It really helped me a lot with takeoff properly. Being able to do something repeatedly at high frequency is the key. I did that for 4 years and know the pumptrack and jump lips by heart, which then allowed me to try things like throwing the bike sideway.

Buy a small launch ramp if you dont happen to have access to such daily practice.
 

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See if you can find somewhere with a skills area to practice. I'm heading to a park later today that has a nice skills are with three progressively larger drops on a dedicated loop so you can just roll them again and again and as you gain comfort on the small move up to the large.
 

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I still have fear of crash but it just takes a much bigger jump, drop to get me to that place than it used to.
 

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Start small and work your way up.
I was going to say something snarky like "be good at it" but this is the real answer. Fear comes from the uncertainty of what's going to happen when your wheels come off the ground. The way to avoid that is to know or at least be nearly certain of what's going to happen. The way to accomplish that is master the small stuff and then slowly scale up.
 

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Get Down Do you
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start small, and hit it often. try 1 footers, then 2 footers....etc....
This a million times over. Find an area, hopefully, with different sized drops and start small until you feel comfortable and work your way up. Remember it's not do it until you get it right it's keep doing it until you don't get it wrong.
 

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I used to avoid every jump on the trail and pump singles every time. Now I can and do try to hit the singles and smaller lips. It's true that the tabletops still freak me out and I tend to dead sailor some on them. I haven't really practiced, but when I sessioned the jump line, it definitely got better. Next time it was like brand new again, so I know I need to repeat it to make improvements. I'm thinking of building a small roller jump out of wood and putting it in my backyard for lunch break, days when I don't have time to pack the bike and go ride for 90 minutes, etc.
 

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This is good advice:

But seriously the comment about working your way up is the best here. As a 50+ year old here I have been learning to jump and the best thing for me as been to just start small and work my way up. Once I started to nail the jumps with repeated success I could move up to the next size. Same with drops. Start really small, then work your way up.

Repetition is your friend. They say that you have to do something 50 times for it to become habit so figure you need to ace a drop 50 times before you jump to the next size. Also when you come back to an area, work your way up again as a part of the warm up, don't just banzai into the first set of large jumps.
 

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I just wanna go fast!
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what a lot of people have said here. Start with tables so you can learn to judge the speed required without overshooting everything first. When stuff starts getting bigger, the best rule is if you can't visualize yourself doing it, don't sit around stressing, move on and come back another time. Going off jumps stiff and afraid can lead to crashes that would otherwise be avoidable.
 

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A lot of those jumps and drops have deductible written all over them for me. 😀

At 50 I've become a little cautious about hitting features. It's hurts more, takes longer to heal and I want to keep riding and not be sidelined.
 

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Always in the wrong gear
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I've never claimed to be Brandon Semenuk, I'll never 'full-send' A-line in Whistler, but I've literally never understood the fear of drops.

Like... you just....ride off them. Get just a little speed, Pull up the front a little and make sure your back tire is over or at least very close to the edge before your front tire starts to trend downward. That's all there is to it. rock ledge, wood fearture, doesnt matter.
curb height or ten feel, doesn't matter. It's the same.
This one is a 6' tall wooden feature, with a long transition, making the total vertical drop to where wheels touch down closer to 9-10'. It's really no different than riding off a tall curb.
Sky Natural landscape Wood Branch Tree
 
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