Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I've been in a bike coma for 7 years (whats with the the 29" tires? so odd) either way I'm still rocking my 26er '07 santa cruz blur in new england rocky/ rooty slightly wet to dry dirt trails.

I used to love the Nevegal Stick E but seems it s hard to find them in 26x 2.1

I cant go larger as I tried using the Kenda Honey badger in 2.2 frt and rear but the rear rubbed the seat stay ( dish is fine, spokes adjusted to give clearance I just need to go to a thinner tire per LBS as adjusting for more clearance in seat stay area, i get less clearance towards the chain stay area near the bottom brack shell)

So my question is... Any recs for new england roots/ rocks,?

The honey badgers were slipping on rocks their first ride out and it was bone dry.
I do understand the badgers are more rounded so dropping to a 2.1 in the rear with a more tradiitonal profile will likely give enough clearance with tire rub/ seat stay even with spoke/ tire flexion

I could stay a 2.2 in the front as I've seen no issues but throw a 2.1 in the rear.
 

·
since 4/10/2009
Joined
·
34,389 Posts
Going to be difficult to find quality tires in 26er flavors with the best, grippiest rubber compounds anymore. There's some, but not many. Maxxis sells some of their tires in 26er with better rubber compounds. Your other problem is tire width. Wider tires are the trend these days, so narrower than a 2.2 will be hard to find.

I think you're mostly just going to have to use what fits, rather than what's optimal for your conditions.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,390 Posts
Welcome back!

Many bikes come with wider front...not required but gives a bit more meat for cornering while less rubber in back is easier to spin (supposedly). My 2018 Kona (27.5) came with 2.3 rear/2.5 front.

My backup bike is a 2012 SC Heckler (26). It came with Maxxis High Rollers in 2.4. They were great but I couldn't always find them. I also tried WTB Bronsons but sidewalls did not last as long as the Maxxis. I agree with Harold, selection may be limited. On-line places come and go but I've used Cambria, Worldwide Cyclery, Blue Sky, 365, Nashbar, Jensen, Amazon, etc.

As stated above, look into tubeless. I swapped to tubeless on my Heckler a few years ago. The rims were not 'tubeless ready' but I used Stans 'conversion kit' and it worked well. With tubes I ran at about 32psi. When I swapped to tubeless the sweet spot is 20psi. It makes a TON of difference with traction/ride/feel in NE terrain. I'm 220lbs and ride the same boney New England stuff you do.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
As stated above, look into tubeless. I swapped to tubeless on my Heckler a few years ago. The rims were not 'tubeless ready' but I used Stans 'conversion kit' and it worked well. With tubes I ran at about 32psi. When I swapped to tubeless the sweet spot is 20psi. It makes a TON of difference with traction/ride/feel in NE terrain. I'm 220lbs and ride the same boney New England stuff you do.
so if i go tubeless I still run in the tire size issue correct? 2.1 all around or a 2.3 up front and 2.1 in rear? going tubeless form your insight will help with grip and allow me not to focus so much on the tire brand. correct?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,644 Posts
If you want to stay with Kenda's, have you considered their Karma's? Looks like they're still available in 26x1.95, 2.0. 2.1, and 2.2, with Kenda's DTC (dual compound rubber) and folding bead. I see them at Amazon for less than $35.

Link
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,500 Posts
No. There is no hope for someone who is limited to a 2.1" 26 diameter tire. Sorry. But, the bike will look good hanging on the wall next to those 207cm Dynamic VR17's!
;)


This post is meant to be light hearted, but really, I'd highly recommend some 29x2.3+" tires....with a new bike attached. If you are getting back into riding, I think you'd be happier.....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,807 Posts
You can use as wide a tire as will fit in your fork as a front. . . . But you haven't noticed with the wider tires has come wider rims to support the tire sidewall and let you run lower pressure for a bigger footprint. 30mm between the rim beads and more. You may have 19mm. That requires higher pressure to keep the sidewall from folding over. Once you have wider rims the sidewall wrinkles instead for more traction.

Along the lines of what MSU said ask at the shops in your area about any upcoming demo days. You can ride different bikes free at trails.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top