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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Been up a couple times this year on my new to me bike. Its a 10 year old bike and the fork is super soft for my weight (190lbs). The rear shock seems to still be in pretty good shape, and is air so I can adjust it. The last couple long descents have been a little rougher, and a little more agressive than I'm used to, but I've had a blast.

Each time though, my hands start to throb, and get fairly painful as blood pounds through them. Is this most likely from a fork thats not doing the greatest at absorbing the small frequent impacts?
My other friends who have ridden less than me this season arent getting the same problem on same trails, buy they do all have newer bikes with pretty spendy forks.

I have tried with and without bike gloves for comparison.they help slightly bit dont really help much.
 

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How wide is your bar, and how long is your stem? Would you consider a shorter stem w/ wider bar...more leverage = less need for the death grip.

Edit: oh, also look at your grip diameter. If you have pretty big mitts, you might need a fatter grip...like some Oury or Ruffians?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
When I got the bike, it had 620mm bars and a 100 or 110 stem. I've bought a 700mm bar mounted up with a 80mm stem now and it is definitely a big improvement over the smaller ones. Only ridden twice actually mountain biking since I got the new bars. Definitely more control but the lock on grips I put on the new bars are a little skinny(diameter wise), and I might be subconsciously death gripping my handlebars until I get more used to the wider bars.
I do have pretty big mits so I might want to look at some larger grips as well.
 

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Class Clown
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I've got some odi lock ons I believe called rogue and they are pretty chuncky, and I have average hands + gel padded gloves.

Still what's the deal with the fork does it dive through its travel real easily?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I've got some odi lock ons I believe called rogue and they are pretty chuncky, and I have average hands + gel padded gloves.

Still what's the deal with the fork does it dive through its travel real easily?
Maybe I'll look into some better gloves first. Mine are pretty darn thin in the palms.

And yes, the fork seems to use up the travel rather quickly. I didn't notice any hard bottoms out but I wouldn't be surprised if its getting close or gently bottoming out. The kid I bought the Cannondale from was about 150lbs, so I'm a decent amount heavier.
 

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Death grip. Many of us run rigid bikes with stiffer grips and have little to no hand pain. I use Ergon grips which aren't all that cush with thin gloves and ride through jarring/jittery rock gardens. I might rattle out my feelings, but, still have feeling in my hands. Just relax the grip.
 

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Class Clown
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Death grip. Many of us run rigid bikes with stiffer grips and have little to no hand pain. I use Ergon grips which aren't all that cush with thin gloves and ride through jarring/jittery rock gardens. I might rattle out my feelings, but, still have feeling in my hands. Just relax the grip.
I did the same thing when I first started. Fork was super stiff (wrong spring, bad lubrication) and I bought roadie gloves. Rode like that for years till I got some decent wrenching skills. Which is why I would take a rigid fork over one that is too soft. Too soft and you are blowing through travel on every bump and bouncing around on climbs...no wonder death grip.
 

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When I got the bike, it had 620mm bars and a 100 or 110 stem. I've bought a 700mm bar mounted up with a 80mm stem now and it is definitely a big improvement over the smaller ones. Only ridden twice actually mountain biking since I got the new bars. Definitely more control but the lock on grips I put on the new bars are a little skinny(diameter wise), and I might be subconsciously death gripping my handlebars until I get more used to the wider bars.
I do have pretty big mits so I might want to look at some larger grips as well.
Just as a point of ref for you OP, the Oury lock-on are not foamy super soft grips, and I run these on all my bikes, including a DH bike, and my trail and DH gloves are unpadded.
I'd suggest some 720mm bar as a min, and a 70mm stem as a max. If you can afford it, go carbon bar.

Sent from my GT-P3110 using Tapatalk
 

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Yes! Yes! Carbon fiber handle bars! I had ridden alloy bars since 1998 and then switched to CF last Fall. There is a noticeable reduction in trail vibration/chatter transfer. You can get Easton EC handle bars for cheap all over the place right now, too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Just as a point of ref for you OP, the Oury lock-on are not foamy super soft grips, and I run these on all my bikes, including a DH bike, and my trail and DH gloves are unpadded.
I'd suggest some 720mm bar as a min, and a 70mm stem as a max. If you can afford it, go carbon bar.

Sent from my GT-P3110 using Tapatalk
Thanks guys! Lots of helpful advice. Going to do some more riding tonight and consciously try not to death grip, seeing how it goes. I did recently go from broke college student to working a full time job+ an additional 10 hrs a week at Jimmy John's , so I will have a decent amount of extra money when the paychecks start flowing. I prefer to save up and buy quality, but of course I am also looking for good value.

Suggestions on carbon bars? 720-780mm range, 20-40mm rise, I checked out the easton EC, I just like to check out a few brands before my purchase.

Further more a couple questions on forks. My Cannondale has a 1.5" compatible Steerer tube because it was designed around the lefty. It has a headset which reduces it to straight 1 1/8". Seeing as how most modern forks have gone tapered, in my situation would I get any benefit from a tapered head tube? I realize I would have to buy a new headset or spacer for the bottom, but since the last frame isn't tapered there is there any advantage to this? I know they still have 1 1/8 tubes, and 9mm QR forks, but I would prefer to upgrade into the range of 120-160mm travel with 15 or 20mm axle. I feel like if I'm upgrading I might as well spend the extra to get an air fork, preferably one with a lockout. 3 stages works too(ctd, rct3 or similar) . I have looked at the Reba, some Fox float 32 and 34's. Ballpark 500-700 will be the most I am willing to spend on a fork. I also have this idea (only from browsing forums searching for a fork I want, not personal experience) that adjustable travel forks aren't as plush as their fixed travel counterpart, and I would be totally fine with a fixed 130, 140 or 150mm travel fork. My bike can take the slacker geometry a taller fork would fit on it (up to about a 160mm max). I don't know much about companies besides Fox and rockshox. I know Manitou and marzocchi are reputable, but I'm not familiar with any others. I'm open to all suggestions and advice!

Also, it going to be a few months down the road before I can afford a new fork, but I know this bike needs one.. The 04' Manitou Black is just way too soft, and with no availability for new parts its time for a switch!
 

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Fat-tired Roadie
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My favorite culprit is bad fit. Try a shorter stem, moving up in your spacer, stack, a higher angle, or risers. Do 'em in order of cheapest first. Buy cheap stems.
 
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