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I know this isn't fat bike specific but the topic likely wouldn't get much traction in the road TT forum ;)

I have self-diagnosed Raynaud's disease, but seriously my fingers turn white and frozen without much effort so I am motivated to find the warmest glove or mitts available, ideally without the need to go to battery heated gloves or add-on pogies. The goal is to stay warm to -20C.

My current arsenal includes Bontrager OMW gloves and 45NRTH Sturmfist 4 - does anyone make warmer options?
 

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Elitest thrill junkie
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I have pretty bad Reynaud's. Hell just now on the ride my fingers were going numb at times and I was using pogies while others were just using regular riding gloves.

Do some research and searches, you'll start to find a lot of information.

The warmest gloves are just going to make your hands sweat...and then they'll get cold. This is the catch 22 with riding.

There is pretty much no such thing as breathable and waterproof/windproof. Your hands are one of the primary temp regulating areas of your body and they like to sweat. Bulky gloves also suck for riding. It's like trying to ride in boxing gloves.

As you know, your palm can be plenty hot and your fingers will just freeze numb, the gloves at that point work opposite, drawing heat away from your fingers like a heat-sink.

What works?

Well, chem heaters are a big help, especially the boot-variety that you can grip to your handlebar with adhesive. If the adhesive itself isn't enough, small strips of tape will do the rest. These last 3-4 hours IME, so it doesn't take many of these. The issue usually happens a bit into a ride anyway. They start best if you put them next to your body/in a warm spot, then pull them out after you've got them started. Putting them on the bar "cold" makes them (and your fingers) take forever to heat up.

I don't do this all the time, but I need to have this option all the time. Even sometimes in the middle of the summer on a chilly descent.

Big over-size soft-shell mittens. These are a PITA to find, but they've worked great. Gloves become all but useless for my fingers when they start to get cold (see above). I do not recommend back-up gloves for anyone with Reynauds. The only thing that works without having to go to heaters in this situation is usually mittens. I have a pair of XC skiing ones that I found a few seasons ago. I wanted to pick up a replacement pair this year, but they were out all season-long, so I took my old ones on the Iditarod trail, all sewed up with repairs. Being significantly bigger than my hand size, it allows me to grip the brake and bar, vs. smaller or insulated/hard-shell mittens that are too small or bulky to do this with. Hands can still get a little sweaty inside, but generally stay warm in all conditions (inside pogies as well, but I'm riding from about 0 to -35C or so). I can generally remove myself from the chem heaters with these by alternating between regular riding gloves and these, put the riding gloves next to my body in an inside pocket to warm them back up. When my fingers get too warm from the mittens, put the gloves back on. They are damp, but my hands being warm and the gloves being warmed makes them viable again.

Not only should you always bring at least one pair of extra gloves/mittens to have something dry, but on those colder days, start off with your regular system and pop those chem-heaters and put them inside the mittens, inside your frame bag/pack. Then, when your fingers get cold mid-ride, your mittens are already pre-heated. IME, fumbling with gloves or ANYTHING mechanical mid-ride is a recipe for your fingers tanking to an un-recoverable situation. I've been there. You need "outs", things that you can use to recover your fingers in those situations.

Another secret I've found are Jacks R Better down insulated sleeves. They are sleeves, no jacket. Put them over your arms. They plug into pogies very nice too. This boosts your arm temp without making your core too hot. I bought them on a whim and they've become one of my favorite winter parts. This at least brings warmer blood closer to your hands. As anyone with Reynaud's knows, the body is failing to regulate itself, so you can sit there and make your core as hot as possible, be sweating like a dog, your body still won't send warm blood to your fingers.

If you don't want heated grips or pogies, life is going to be real hard for you IME at those temps. For me, in winter, I want to ride in comfort where I'm not fighting the elements. I am not on heated grips because I'm doing expedition stuff where I can't count on electronics, but again, I am all for whatever it takes to ride in comfort, vs. fighting.

You gotta learn to manage climbs vs. descents, roll up the pogies and then beef stuff back up for the descents.

Not sure what your aversion is to pogies. Some people irrationally think that they somehow "prevent" getting your hands out for crashes and stuff. I use them on my non-fat bikes at times when the temps call for it.

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Trail Ninja
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ideally without the need to go to battery heated gloves or add-on pogies. The goal is to stay warm to -20C.
If those Canadian Forces surplus Extreme Cold mitts don't work for ya, and you draw the line at heating and pogies, how does big supply of hand warmers sound?

Dunno about your condition, but you seem to be acting like a barbarian without fire or shelter with your optimism that something that works by retaining body heat is adequate for your case.

Whatcha gonna do if anything breaks down? I know I'd be loving that heat to gives my hands dexterity and recover from being exposed to the elements.
 

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EAT MORE GRIME
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just go with pogies and save yourself tons of aggravation

I know you said no pogies but that doesn't make sense if your goal is
best warmth and care for your hands.
 

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-20 F I can't speak to, but 0-10 F no problem with a pair of Hand Up winter gloves a friend gave me. I used to use pogies (and still have them), but these gloves seem to work great for me. Just warm enough to get started, then my hands warm up enough to be comfortable. If closer to 30 degrees, they are too warm and hands sweat.

If I were going out for a longer ride at 0, or encountered weather below 0, I'd use these gloves with pogies and ditch them if overheating.
 

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-20F I use Cobrafist pogies and those mittens that allow you to expose fingers if needed.

If you insist on no pogies and are in -20F with wind the only thing that might work is fingerless mittens.
 

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Not sure this will work but I too have pseudo Renaud's hands and feet turn a pasty waxy white and then when they thaw it agony ... I love to snowboard and about to hang it up do to the pain and cold. UNTIL! I bought these;

Gloves

Toe heaters

I use the snow dear mittens because I don't need the separate fingers, but for riding you would. I have used them couple seasons now and they are very warm even before turning them on.

the Hottronic foot warmers are DREAMY! pretty sure these can be stuck in any show/insole.
 

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FYI I bought a pair of cheap battery warmed sox off Amazon just to try them ($17 or so).

Completely worthless, one of the socks had the warming element way out of position and neither had enough.

Go big or don't bother with that stuff.
 

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EAT MORE GRIME
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I think it will be a combination of warm gloves (I really like hestra brand gloves, they are very well made) chem warmers, and circulation exercises on the trail. First find a tight fitting base layer long sleeve shirt that has thumb holes, as covering your wrists is a big step towards staying warm. Then stick adhesive toe warmers on the inside of your wrists. Before and during the ride, do some exercises that will promote blood flow to your hands (youtube). And remember when you are riding, to shake your hands out, and move your fingers around.
 

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What Jayem said, plus my experience - I use leather shell snowboard mittens (all 4 fingers together). Although my hands sweat in these, my hands still remain warm. I sometimes use chemical handwarmers in them.
I previously tried some cheap snowmobile mitts that I picked up at Canadian Tire, but they were absolutely terrible - they didn't breathe at all, and the instant there was any sweat inside, they turned from warm to refrigerated.

There is an adjustment period for using big bulky leather mitts, but for me the warmth is worth it.
 
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