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So I'm at Sears today trying to figure out what to get with my gift certificate, and I see this hand-held powdercoater. You can choose from several different colors that come in little dime bag-esque pouches, and it's 169.00. Whadda ya think? Has anyone else seen one of these? If it isn't a total piece of crap it might be cool for components.
 

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Transplant
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banks said:
Do you have a spare electric oven?
Banks is right on. I was researching them a while ago after I saw a kit on ebay for $100. Its all well and good until you need to bake the finish. For the $169 you could save up and get an air compressor and paint gun and do wet paint instead. Unless you want to get serious with the powdercoating, I would leave it to the pros.

My 2 pennies
 

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"Do you have a spare electric oven?"

Should be "Do you have a spare electric oven BIG enough to fit a 29er frame?"
 

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If you are a DIY spirit, give it a shot and start a thread on home powder coating. I am sure many people would be curious about your process of doing it at home.

Cost wise, it'll probably be cheaper to just let the pros do it. By pros, I don't mean $$$$ places like Spectrum Powderworks, I mean the local joint that does car and industrial parts.

You have to factor in the cost of an oven to bake the components once you coat it. Also factor in the cost of setup items like some kinda hanging rig, saftey stuff like a goggles and a respirator mask, etc...

But it's up to you. It's sometimes fun to chalk up one new skill learned in life and sometimes a price can't be put on that ya know? Let us know what you decide.
 

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Big Wheel Homer !!
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I powdercoated the cranks in the pic below. Its not hard it you have a area to apply the powder (spraybooth) and a oven to cure the powder. I looked up the system from Sears online, can't tell much about it but the one thing I saw they didn't mention, is that the part that's being sprayed must be grounded. The electrostaticly charged powder won't be attracted to the part unless it's grounded, and it won't "stick" to the part until you can get it in the oven. I have a small walk in booth and a batch oven at work that I use. I have painted a couple of frames, and put some black baking enamel on a couple of silver BB lock rings, but the cranks are the first parts I have powder coated. My oven is only big enough for small parts.

You would have to use a non-food oven, if you could pick up a old kitchen oven used out of the classifieds, and had someplace to spray the powder, it might be fun to play with.

Steve
 

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Big Wheel Homer !!
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Yunkie said:
Come to think of it, my wife is a mosaic artist - could I use her kiln??
In the Sears add it says you need to bake the powder @400 for 20 min after the powder flows out, that's saying you cant get the metal temp up to temp very fast,but if you can get the metal temp to 350-400 for 10 min. thats enough to cure most powders.

Steve
 

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MightySchmoePong said:
You guys are pathetic. All you need is a hair-dryer and a bit of patience :)
In that case, I am cruizin' down to my local hair salon and sitting with my components on top of my head under the salon dryer ;)

 

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Wow, nice cranks!

Cool canks, nice job! That sounds like a fun process. I thank an old ceramics kiln might do the trick for a frame.

Geez it makes me want to ahve a huge barn to fill up with tools!

How hot does the powdercoat need to get before it cures?

Porch
 

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Big Wheel Homer !!
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Porchsong said:
Cool canks, nice job! That sounds like a fun process. I thank an old ceramics kiln might do the trick for a frame.

Geez it makes me want to ahve a huge barn to fill up with tools!

How hot does the powdercoat need to get before it cures?

Porch
The key to curing powder is the metal temp. You need to get the metal temp up to 350-400 degrees for about 10 min., depending on the chemistry on the powder. There are some low cure powders available that cure at 250 degrees, but there are not alot of color options and the price is a bit higher. The heavier the metal guage is, the longer it takes to get it up to temp. In the Sears add they say to bake for 20 min after the powders flows, which means the metal is up to temp and is melting the powder. So, depending on the substrate cure times will vary.

Steve
 

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I'm sure that you could get your kitchen oven to do an adequate job. It's a matter of what (if any) chemicals or compounds are given off during the curing process. Might give you a nice toxic glaze on your next ham.
 
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