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Lil' background first....

I graduated from college in '96. Since then my job history looks like this:
Jan. '97 - now: Current job
Fall '97 - now: Parttime work at a national outdoor retailer

During the mid/late 90s, I also worked parttime at a golf course and helped run several of the climbing walls in town. But do I want to go back that far on my applications or resume?

I went to college from '90 - '96 and held a handful of parttime jobs...are those even considered relevant 10+ years later? Although I think I would at least put on my internship that I had from '95 - '96.

Not really looking for a job, but I at least want to start putting together an updated resume for when I do start looking for another gig.

Thanks

Nick
 

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Let the potential employer

determine how years they want you to go back. The important thing is tweaking all of those jobs so as to make them relevant to the job your applying for.
 

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If the work was relevant to your potential position then list it. If you are going for some type of office job they wont care about the golf course work.

Also, you can just put a blurb in by your education saying that you worked part time in college just to show that you are industrious and to off-set any potential bad grades.
 

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Real world advice

List the post college jobs only. List your full time job as the first job block, and be sure to show any progression of job function within that job block. IF and only if the part time job is relevant to what you want to do in the next job change, list it, and go into detail. If not, either don't list it at all (might be a turn off to potential employers who have expectations of your work hours) or just list the title, name of employer and one sentence describing the functionality of the job. Be sure that when you list the dates you specify in parenthesis (part time).

I'm a recruiter with 17 years of agency and corporate experience, and read more resumes in a day than most people read or write in a lifetime. I'm your audience, and I want short, concise, factual information that doesn't beat around the bush. Don't tell me what you're "responsible for". Tell me what you "do". You mught have 30 seconds to catch my attention. If you catch it, I read on. If not, you're in the "No Interest" pile.

Take it for what it's worth, and best wishes in putting together a good business doc.

Bob
 

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sorry clyde didnt anyone tell you?

it s all who you know or how annoying you are.

half of my jobs i have gotten from a friend on the inside. the other half have came from calling back the employer 3-4 times a day to get the interview.

its sad and demeaning but it shows you are really really interested in getting the job.

so yes work on your resume and get it to look neat but when it come down to getting hired you either better know someone on the inside or annoy the hell out off the employer to get noticed case all resumes look the same after the 25th one.
 

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More tips from a pro headhunter (sorry this is long)

Your resume format will depend on your profession. The short and sweet rule only applies to jobs that are more general in nature. Technical/ industry specific jobs will want to see some details about significant accomplishments...not about what your duties and responsibilities are, but how well you do them (what makes you better than the next candidate?).

The best method for getting the next job is to focus on where you want to go, do your research, figure out what YOU bring to the table for the next prospective employer, and sell it as best you can. Market yourself to companies that your background fits. If you are changing direction with your career, don't expect a lateral move. If it takes 2 pages, so be it. I recruit automotive engineers, and I haven't seen a one page resume in the last 8 months. When I do see a one pager from an experienced professional, I think the person is an underachiever.

I have to disagree with hounding a company's HR or a recruiter, unless you want to get backballed. This may work in some cases, but more often than not they won't give you the time of day unless the job is to be an annoying telemarketer or collections agent (where those qualities are desireable). When a candidate hounds me for help, I stop taking their calls. I get paid to find quality people, not to be a social worker. You may find a hiring manager that gets steamrolled over by persistant candidates, but it would be the exception.

Your personal network is your BEST tool to find a great job. In my industry, companies seeking to hire will pay cash bonuses to employees that help them hire good candidates. Often they are willing to overlook your lack of experience in certain areas if they have a solid employee that will vouch for you. From their perspective, they can very happily pay an employee 1500 bucks, or pay me 15-25K to fill that same job. Not to mention, an internal reference gives them the comfort that they are hiring a known commodity rather than a stranger.

Regarding what jobs to keep or not to keep on your resume, you are at the point professionally where part time jobs or college jobs are not relevant anymore. Even your college credentials and professional certifications should be moved to the end of the CV. The only exception is if you are in a field where advanced degrees (PhD's) are required.

After 7-10 years, you should rely on a track record of professional success to sell yourself. If your college jobs are relevant to your current career, OK. But if you were a waiter/cashier/state park employee...let them fade away. I would even say that if you have a part time job right now that isn't core to your career, don't mention it on a resume. Many companies will look at this as a negative. In the auto industry 60 hour weeks are the norm during a new vehicle launch or even more demanding during a quality recall, and they won't be able to count on you at crunch time if you have to leave at 4:30 to go be a bartender at Chili's.

All that being said, this advice only holds true for skilled/professional jobs. If your history involves unskilled/general labor/factory work, your biggest selling point is your ability to show up reliably, not get fired, pass a drug test, and have good references. You can keep those resumes very short and sweet, but you still have to make yourself appear better than the other 500 applicants by highlighting special projects, awards, certifications, etc.

PS: I am not the only recruiter that gets annoyed by candidates that list irrelevant hobbies and religious beliefs on their resume. If it isn't relavent to the job you seek, they aren't going to care unless you are and the hiring manager are both mountain bikers, and you may offend someone with religious/political views.
Good Luck
 

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I read these replies with interest, as I am dusting off my resume at present.

A question for the recruiters...
Say I find a job that looks right up my alley which is advertised on a company's website. Is there any benefot in calling the company cold and asking to speak with someone about the job before I apply online? Then ask the person I speak to if they could provide me with the email and contact info of the person directly responsible for the hiring? Or is it better to go thru the web, and hope it doesn't fade away amongst other candidates?
 

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Yeah...right

nicolicious said:
it s all who you know or how annoying you are.

half of my jobs i have gotten from a friend on the inside. the other half have came from calling back the employer 3-4 times a day to get the interview.

its sad and demeaning but it shows you are really really interested in getting the job.

so yes work on your resume and get it to look neat but when it come down to getting hired you either better know someone on the inside or annoy the hell out off the employer to get noticed case all resumes look the same after the 25th one.
Thank you for playing our game. Johnny, what lovely parting gift do we have for our contestant? A no interest letter? Better luck next time! :thumbsup:
 

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knucklesandwich said:
I read these replies with interest, as I am dusting off my resume at present.

A question for the recruiters...
Say I find a job that looks right up my alley which is advertised on a company's website. Is there any benefot in calling the company cold and asking to speak with someone about the job before I apply online? Then ask the person I speak to if they could provide me with the email and contact info of the person directly responsible for the hiring? Or is it better to go thru the web, and hope it doesn't fade away amongst other candidates?
hmmm. good question, and my answer is that it depends on how close of a fit your professional experience is to the job I am trying to fill, and if I am in a good mood.;)

Example: right now, I am scouring the earth looking for Diesel Engineers. If one called my phone right now, I would probably have an orgasm. If I am the HR manager at a fortune 500 company with 35 positions to fill, I would only welcome that kind of call on the most difficult to fill positions...if the candidates background fits.

Be aware that HR managers are are difficult to predict. Some of them are very concerned about getting the right candidate for their hiring mangers, some have very little authority so they exercise it on candidates waiting to get in.

My advice is call and ask for HR or perhaps even the functional manager for the area you are seeking to work for. Try to not give up identifiying information until you get the pulse of the manager you get on the phone. If the call is poorly received, you can hang up without identifying yourself. If they are warm and welcoming, sell. If they are cold and abrupt, let them know you currently work for a competitor, and you are interested in the posting....but concerned about the confidentiality of applying blindly to their website (in case someone there knows your boss or some of your current co-workers)...this is actually a legitimate concern for an employed candidate. Ask how they would like to proceed, but ask them to ensure your privacy if you submit your resume. If they offer you a verbal commitment, they will be looking for your stuff when it gets through the filters and it moves to the top of the stack (if it fits).

PS: PLEASE have someone read your resume. Spellcheck isn't foolproof, and everyone is the worst person at seeing their own spelling and grammar mistakes.
 

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dh1 said:
(snip).... If they are cold and abrupt, let them know you currently work for a competitor, and you are interested in the posting....but concerned about the confidentiality of applying blindly to their website (in case someone there knows your boss or some of your current co-workers)...this is actually a legitimate concern for an employed candidate. Ask how they would like to proceed, but ask them to ensure your privacy if you submit your resume....(snip)
I may be getting confused by the context here. Are you assuming the job seeker actually *does* work for the competition? Or is this presented as a way to justify going directly to HR?

I would assume that ones resume would need to match verbal statements. So if that equals blatant fabrication on a resume, can't that result in some serious hot water later on? In my field at least, that could be a career ender.
 

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endohappy said:
I may be getting confused by the context here. Are you assuming the job seeker actually *does* work for the competition? Or is this presented as a way to justify going directly to HR?

I would assume that ones resume would need to match verbal statements. So if that equals blatant fabrication on a resume, can't that result in some serious hot water later on? In my field at least, that could be a career ender.
Yeah, you misunderstood my verbage. I was assuming that the OP had competitive experience to validate the claim that the job was right up their ally.

Without that, you will have to wordsmith another way to get in front of a decision maker without sounding dumb by saying " I saw your ad, what am I supposed to do".

If you don't have competitive experience, but you still think the job is a good fit for some reason, you could say "Hi Mr. Hiring authority. Your ad sparked my interest because I am currently in a similar role for another firm in town....I have a few questions about the position before I apply."
 

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dh1 said:
hmmm. good question, and my answer is that it depends on how close of a fit your professional experience is to the job I am trying to fill, and if I am in a good mood.;)

Example: right now, I am scouring the earth looking for Diesel Engineers. If one called my phone right now, I would probably have an orgasm. If I am the HR manager at a fortune 500 company with 35 positions to fill, I would only welcome that kind of call on the most difficult to fill positions...if the candidates background fits.

Be aware that HR managers are are difficult to predict. Some of them are very concerned about getting the right candidate for their hiring mangers, some have very little authority so they exercise it on candidates waiting to get in.

My advice is call and ask for HR or perhaps even the functional manager for the area you are seeking to work for. Try to not give up identifiying information until you get the pulse of the manager you get on the phone. If the call is poorly received, you can hang up without identifying yourself. If they are warm and welcoming, sell. If they are cold and abrupt, let them know you currently work for a competitor, and you are interested in the posting....but concerned about the confidentiality of applying blindly to their website (in case someone there knows your boss or some of your current co-workers)...this is actually a legitimate concern for an employed candidate. Ask how they would like to proceed, but ask them to ensure your privacy if you submit your resume. If they offer you a verbal commitment, they will be looking for your stuff when it gets through the filters and it moves to the top of the stack (if it fits).

PS: PLEASE have someone read your resume. Spellcheck isn't foolproof, and everyone is the worst person at seeing their own spelling and grammar mistakes.
That is an awesome answer- similar to what I was kind of thinking, but stated more succinctly. I am waiting it out one more day or so, to see if I can get in touch with a recruiter that works with this company, and also to hear back from a family friend who is a major client of the company. Barring that, I will probably use your advice Thurs/Fri.
Thanks.
 
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