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Livin' the Dream
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hypothetical: You live in a major metropolitan area, 12 hour drive to the closest ski area, but decent biking trails nearby. You've got a great job in terms of income, but it isn't "what you're meant to do" (or where you're meant to be). Money is no issue, you have plenty of it and no worries. You have a chance to move to a small town in the mountains, but make considerably less. You can stay in the city and be "secure" or you can take the job in the mountains. Higher quality of life w/ no money vs. financial security Do you continue to take it on the chin for the man, just so you can provide for your family, or do you move your family in anticipation of more quality family time and upbringing in the great outdoors? What would you do?
 

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Asbury said:
Hypothetical: You live in a major metropolitan area, 12 hour drive to the closest ski area, but decent biking trails nearby. You've got a great job in terms of income, but it isn't "what you're meant to do" (or where you're meant to be). Money is no issue, you have plenty of it and no worries. You have a chance to move to a small town in the mountains, but make considerably less. You can stay in the city and be "secure" or you can take the job in the mountains. Higher quality of life w/ no money vs. financial security Do you continue to take it on the chin for the man, just so you can provide for your family, or do you move your family in anticipation of more quality family time and upbringing in the great outdoors? What would you do?:rolleyes:
this is a dilemna i have, currently i live in the DC area, make good amounts of money, but hate being here, i want more space! unfortunetly i'm in software engineering and there are no jobs anywhere i want to go, it's so lame. I could try and start out in some new career, but as you stated there would be no security... it's a very hard decision, and i'm no gambler, so it looks like i'm stuck unhappy where i am, at least for a few more years.
 

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IPAs make me wanna puke.
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If you were flying solo, this would be a no-brainer. Life is way too short to be doing something you're not geeked about; you could be gone tomorrow.

Having a family places a great deal of variation on this decision. You need to be discussing this with your wife and consider the hardship it places on her and the hardship it places on your kids. How old are they? Moving when they are younger is easier on them from a social standpoint. Will they have access to a quality education and a set of experiences that keeps their eyes open to the world around them when you move? What are the potential day-to-day changes they would have to make to undertake this move and how would it affect their quality of life? Would the increased "dad time" be enough to offset what they might be losing?
 

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Log off and go ride!
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We did that nearly 30 years ago.

Both my wife and I discussed the fact we were sacrificing income and career oportunities with the move, but were willing to go. We agreed we could always move back if things were too tight.

We stayed and never considered moving back. We both enjoy driving past several trout streams on our daily work commutes and we can jump on our bikes in our yard and pedal for miles through the forest and meadows without seeing another rider. The financial sacrifices were negligible compared to the amenities we gained.

We both smile when we think about the thousands of those poor schmucks in some big city cubicle fighting the smog and commuter traffic every day, dreaming of spending a couple of weeks every year vacationing where we live.
 

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life is a barrel o'fun
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Years ago, I worked on a magazine called Mother Earth News. Basically, it's for people who live "off-the-grid," that is they strive to be as self-sustaining as possible (growing their own food, using solar/geothermal energy, recyling, composting etc. etc.) Ironically, it was my first magazine job in the city.

Whenever I had some time, I'd go into the storage closet and check out the back issues. The very first issue contained an editorial by the founders, John & Jane Shuttleworth. It explained how they'd have cityfolk visiting their large homestead in the country, and how the visitors were astonished at their "millionaire" lifestyle!

It boils down to security: If you need money to keep you secure (pay the rent/bills/food for kids) then it makes you happy. If you can survive just fine in the mountains without much of it, then you've got security, you're happy, and you don't need the money to make it happen.
 

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Don't Stop Spinnin'!
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in my opinion passion comes first. I get offered over-time at work and I decline the offers to go out and ride when I want. You live life once... might as well enjoy it doing something you really like. :thumbsup:
 

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You got any chocolate?
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This thread could not have been timed better. I was asked if I wanted overtime this weekend and next, both Sat and Sun, 12 hrs each day. I said "Yes!!!", , but as soon as those words left my mouth, I felt that sinking feeling in my gut that deep down inside I knew I wanted to be home with my wife, our bikes and our dog. Turns out the overtime was cancelled and I was relieved and not disappointed at all. Financially we are okay. Not rich, but not struggling either. I thought about it at length and decided moving forward, I would turn down any overtime unless ordered to do it. Life is too short and my wife and I both live pretty simple lives. Plus in all honesty, she hates it when I work weekends and so do I.

It really all boils down to this: Do we work to live or live to work?

To the OP: MOVE!! And don't look back!! Good luck!!
 

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I faced this same problem after graduating college. Stay near or go big. I have since learned that money to me is well...not important. What is important to me is my quality of life. Money cannot relieve the stress nor buy back the hours you sit in traffic on your morning commute. I feel confident with my decision and I stand ready to face any challenge that will come my way based on my decision.
 

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I would like it to be a balance of both. While I do like the open country,big property and I can do whatever the hell I want to do with it. Then again, if I'm to far out there I get the lonely/scared feeling that is just discomforting. I would be happy if I had a decent job to where I could live without going from paycheck to paycheck, but also be close enough (1-3 hours) away from a decent riding spot.
 

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Take this from someone who is a voice of considerable experience in such matters. Unless you have a shoein opportunity to work with Donald Trump... MAKE THE MOVE. You will survive, your wife will survive, your children will survive and you will ALL be much happier, healthy'r, fulfilled, centered and high on life and each other.

Talk it over with your spouse (life partner) and if she is OK with it ... have no fear. I will work for you.

Best... Dave
 

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beer thief
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Life is no dress rehearsal, you get no second chance. Quality of life is far more important than being able to afford more material objects.

Take it from someone living in a small town in the mountains and make a move. You won't regret it and the opportunities and environment for kids are usually better also.
 

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I understand the "theme" of this thread, but I don't feel Asbury has provided a clear enough picture. I'm all for the "you don't need money, you just need happiness" feel of this thread. However, when you say you have plenty of money now but will have no money in the mountains, I have to ask how much money now and how little money in the mountains. Do you have enought money now to pay cash for the mountain house? If not, will you make enough money to live comfortably in the mountains, or will you be struggling to pay your utilities?

I say that living in the mountains would be great, but not if I coudn't afford to ski, or to maintain my bike(s) (I'm not big on hiking).
 

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As was stated earlier, this thread is very well timed. On Wednesday my wife and I had a conversation regarding my job. We decided that after fifteen years I will find a new job at the end of this school year. I'm aware of several positions throughout the county that I am qualified for; however, there are few positions in the area where I live. This is where things get complicated. My wife and kids are very attached to this area and one of the greatest attachments is to my in-laws who have failing heath. They are wonderful people, and I would never want to abandon them in a time of need. We are the only relatives within 800 miles, so when there is an emegency, which is fairly often, we need to provide support.

As I write I'm coming to the realization that I will probably need to accept a lower level positon and take a pay cut to make the move because this is the best thing for my family at this time. Thanks for helping me examine my priorities. They are family, health (this includes lots of riding) and then money. :)
 

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I guess my big question is are you married with children?

Downscaling your life is very easy, If you are the only person to have to live with your decision. Once family members are involved, the dynamic changes. Does your wife or SO share your vision? Are young children involved? Will things like medical insurance be available to you after the move? You say that money will not be the issue. Is that really true, or just a perception?

I think that money issues is one of the big killers of relationships. When things are tight, attitudes change. Especially if your family is used to living a different lifestyle. Suddenly your "passion" may be a lightning rod for your spouse's wrath. If you have a spouse, just make sure they are truly on board with the lifestyle change before you make it.
 

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trailgrinder said:
As was stated earlier, this thread is very well timed. On Wednesday my wife and I had a conversation regarding my job. We decided that after fifteen years I will find a new job at the end of this school year. I'm aware of several positions throughout the county that I am qualified for; however, there are few positions in the area where I live. This is where things get complicated. My wife and kids are very attached to this area and one of the greatest attachments is to my in-laws who have failing heath. They are wonderful people, and I would never want to abandon them in a time of need. We are the only relatives within 800 miles, so when there is an emegency, which is fairly often, we need to provide support.

As I write I'm coming to the realization that I will probably need to accept a lower level positon and take a pay cut to make the move because this is the best thing for my family at this time. Thanks for helping me examine my priorities. They are family, health (this includes lots of riding) and then money. :)
My wife and I have lived in some nice places and also in some stupid places, but we were always able to find something good about every place. I think a lot of it is in one's attitude. Will you convince yourself that you're not happy wherever you are?

When your loved ones are in need though, then that should take precedence. Money is nice, great locations are nice, but in the end I'm guessing people and love will matter most.
 

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Livin' the Dream
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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
jspharmd said:
I understand the "theme" of this thread, but I don't feel Asbury has provided a clear enough picture. I'm all for the "you don't need money, you just need happiness" feel of this thread. However, when you say you have plenty of money now but will have no money in the mountains, I have to ask how much money now and how little money in the mountains. Do you have enought money now to pay cash for the mountain house? If not, will you make enough money to live comfortably in the mountains, or will you be struggling to pay your utilities?

I say that living in the mountains would be great, but not if I coudn't afford to ski, or to maintain my bike(s) (I'm not big on hiking).
Me: 34
Wife: 32
2 year old daughter and another on the way

My pay would drop to about 40% of what I currently make. I could not pay cash for a house but I could probably put about 20-30% down. It would leave enough $ to pay bills and maybe a few hundred dollars a month for fun. The job is w/ a ski resort in Canada so the insurance would be covered. My wife is on board, but is not passionate about it, but is still ok with it. My concern is: my passion to do it will fuel me through alot (ramen noodles are great honey!), but as was pointed out, my passion could be the "lightning rod of her wrath." We both want to move to a small town. We live in a very materialistic city (Dallas) and I grew up in a "Hey Jones', look at what I have!" community. I know it's like that everywhere to a degree, but I just don't want my kids growing up in this environment.
 

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Asbury said:
Hypothetical: You live in a major metropolitan area, 12 hour drive to the closest ski area, but decent biking trails nearby. You've got a great job in terms of income, but it isn't "what you're meant to do" (or where you're meant to be). Money is no issue, you have plenty of it and no worries. You have a chance to move to a small town in the mountains, but make considerably less. You can stay in the city and be "secure" or you can take the job in the mountains. Higher quality of life w/ no money vs. financial security Do you continue to take it on the chin for the man, just so you can provide for your family, or do you move your family in anticipation of more quality family time and upbringing in the great outdoors? What would you do?:rolleyes:
I'd need more info to give this a concrete opinion, so i'll leave you with this food for though ..... cost of living can vary depending on location. Things like property taxes, local gas prices, ammenities and groceries and all that little stuff can, and obvioussly do, add up. No matter how much love you put on the plate, sorry, it STILL isn't food.

With that in mind i'd say look at just what kind of price differences you might be presented with. It can break the situation ..... or make it. :thumbsup:

Further - is there an opportunity that the new location/job entail riding for your commute? There's more money saved. What about where you live now? Is it a house you own? Can you rent it out?

Not trying to be pesimistic, just realistic with bases observed, if not covered. ;) I'd say if it's remotely possible then move.

EDIT - I was still typing while you posted above (i'm feeling slow today - it's my day off). TOUGH call. REALLY tough call ..... only 40%? I got nothin', sorry.
 
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