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I have a set of 2007 Formula Oro Puro brakes. I am running goodridge lines with an 8 inch rotor up front and a 6 inch in back, currently using Dot4 brake fluid. I have them mounted to my Ibis Mogo. When I first got them they were INCREDIBLY LOUD, I couldn't take it, even after bedding them in and 50 miles of riding. The power was also not quite there. I've never used a set before but, everybody I've talked to and read about says good power. I switched to organic pads and they cracked...the rear ones also have that brake fade smell. The rear brake lever has a very mushy feeling compared to the front. Anybody have any ideas or suggestions. I would really appreciate some help with this. Thanks in advance!!!!
 

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The mushy feeling is definitely a bad bleed..... if your LBS did the goodridge install, ask them to recheck that brake... about the sound check that your pads are not contaminated and/or try to recenter the calipers...
 
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woogie11 said:
I have a set of 2007 Formula Oro Puro brakes. I am running goodridge lines with an 8 inch rotor up front and a 6 inch in back, currently using Dot4 brake fluid. I have them mounted to my Ibis Mogo. When I first got them they were INCREDIBLY LOUD, I couldn't take it, even after bedding them in and 50 miles of riding. The power was also not quite there. I've never used a set before but, everybody I've talked to and read about says good power. I switched to organic pads and they cracked...the rear ones also have that brake fade smell. The rear brake lever has a very mushy feeling compared to the front. Anybody have any ideas or suggestions. I would really appreciate some help with this. Thanks in advance!!!!
Hi -

If the Oro with a 200mm rotor doesn't seem strong, there's most definately something wrong!

It sounds like you have a couple of problems. I agree that the mushy lever probably means a bad bleed. Rear brakes will always be a bit softer than the front because of the longer line, but not mushy.

As far as the noise goes, there are a few things we always suggest. First, if you haven't had it done, have the tabs on your frame and fork faced. Proper alignment is critical to quiet brakes, and without facing the tabs, you may never be able to achieve proper alignment. Next, torque the adapter bolts to the value specified in the manual, using a torque wrench. Align the calipers as best you can and torque those bolts correctly as well. Torque the rotor bolts for good measure.

You mentioned switching to organic pads, but the stock Puro pads are actually the same compound as our other organic pads, only with an aluminum backing plate. In any case, the first thing to try is to clean your rotors with denatured alcohol. Try removing the surface material from your pads using sand paper. If they are really contaminated, this generally doesn't help, but it's worth a shot.

Once you get it all put back together, find the longest descent around and try to put some heat into the brakes. This will help break in the pads and the rotor surface.

There isn't a disc brake system made that will be perfectly silent under all conditions, but you shouldn't have to live with continuous squealing.

If you need help or a better description of any of these things, feel free to give us a call at the office!

Best regards,
Greg
 
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