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Looking for some advice. I'm looking to buy my first "nice" bike, namely an aggressive trail/enduro carbon bike. I've been riding on entry level MTBs for years and am finally going to upgrade.

Curious what people's thoughts are on spending ~$5000 on a new modern geo bike with mid level carbon frame and components VS buying last gen's geo with top level carbon and components for the same price.

For example, online you can get a new 2018 Yeti SB5.5 (Turq frame,Factory Fox, X01 Eagle) or a 2018 Bronson (CC, Fox Elite, X01) for ~$4700. Both are bikes that just got major updates in 2019. Paying under $5000 on a new bike with new geo you're most likely getting NX Eagle and a Yari fork and a mid-level frame (perhaps slightly better depending on brand).

I've ridden the SB5.5 and other "last gen" bikes (Niner Rip, Pivot Mach 6) in the past and loved them compared to my current rig. The only "newer" bike I've ridden is the Ripmo, which I absolutely loved. But all these considerations leave me undecided. Of course I'll continue to demo bikes as much as I can, but aside from that any advice?
 

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I built up a V1 Following a two months ago. I bought the frame new at a pretty good price. It was something I wanted for a while. Pretty much all my parts moved over from my XC bike. I just had to get a fork and dropper to get me rolling. After riding the bike...I have absolutely no regrets.

I think as long as the bike suits where you ride...I think you'll be ok by not having the latest and longest.

You just have to put the media and forum hype aside...or else you'll be worrying about your bike going out of style before you even ride it. I know there are people out there that stress about their bike getting "old" the day they receive it.
 

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Very recently, I had the exact same dilemma. One buddy of mine bought a '19 Bronson, told me how different the new geo was, how much better it was than the old version. Another buddy bought the exact '18 Bronson you're talking about, and he loves it.

I'm in the market for a new bike, since I'm riding a '04 Specialized Enduro I bought new, and couldn't decide whether the price difference was worth it. After doing more research than I really needed to, I ended up putting money down on a new Guerrilla Gravity Smash, and am hoping it accomplishes the best of both worlds - modern geo, good components, carbon, for the price of the CC discounted SC bikes.

I think that the rave reviews and the fact that GG is a short drive away made my decision easier, and I'm still demoing any bike I can until I actually take delivery of my Smash, but I think it will be a perfect bike for my trails and riding style. And I can make it a short travel bike with a few spare parts.

I will say, after hours and hours of 'research', that there are a ton of choices in the trail category of bikes right now, and I feel like a large percentage of those choices will be amazing bikes no matter what. Especially coming from an entry level bike, or in my case a dinosaur.
 

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A GX Ripmo is pretty nicely spec'd for $5099....the Fox Performance 36 is a nice fork, for example. If you actually prefer the 5.5, at around $4700 - which is perfectly reasonable - then getting it discounted is great. I wouldn't compromise on the frame design to get a better spec'd fork. Upgrading components is easy, and in many cases turns out to just not be necessary.

Now, if someone is trying to sell you a Ripmo with a Yari fork, walk away. Even the $4200 NX build comes with a Fox 36.
 

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If I was going to buy old geo, I'd buy a used one for 30% of the new cost. That's just me. Sure you don't get warranty but if it broke, you'd only lose the frame and even that can be carbon repaired very cheaply.

And the geo changes recently are a pretty big deal imo.
 

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Latest Bronson is a step up in travel and slackness compared to old Bronson. Its like half way between old bronson and old nomad.

In this instance theres been a step change. So id say new mid spec v old high spec.
But if there is no step change then old higher spec on special is the go.

Thats what i've just done with a new slayer. 2019 slayer was just a different paint job and latest gruppo. but same frame. Saved myself 30%.
 

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If you're planning to hang onto it for a while buy the best newest frame you can afford (new, so you get the warranty) and upgrade the parts as they wear an/or as you can afford to.
 

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Absolutely demo more “new geo” bikes transition, mondraker, Yeti, stumpy Evo, etc.
I am an admitted fan of the new low, long, and slack stuff with the steeper seat tubes. It’s all very dependent on your local terrain and riding style but for me on the steeper stuff 64° HA, longer reach, and low bb have been game changers and even climbing is improved. Bikes fit has not felt aright to me until now. Don’t worry about spec as you can always upgrade but get the frame that feels right.
 

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If you just want longer, lower, slacker, there's tons of killer deals on used bikes. Pretty much any bike can be easily slacked out so if it's a matter of wanting 65 instead of 66, or 64 instead of 65 that's easily addressed. Even my old 2012 HD had a 64 HA via angle set, offset bushing, and 180mm fork. My BB was sky high, and reach was short, but now that I"'ve owned two "modern" bikes, I know it's the HA that really matters to me. I can take or leave a low bb, It's a double edged sword. I can take or leave a long reach/wheelbase because it's also a double edged sword. Seat tube angle on the other hand is all good, and you'll get that on the used market beacuse it's been a thing for a while now. Since this is your first nice bike, you don't know exactly what you like. Don't over think it because you'll just have to play around to see what you like. Because of that, I would go used. The used market is smoking hot these days. You'll get WAY more bike for substantially less. I mean a lot less. I recently bought a nomad3 with a pretty high end build for hundreds less than what just the frame cost only 2 years ago! When you sell you won't lose that much because the original owner already ate those loses. It's a win win as you learn what works best for you.
 

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Get an "old" bike and take your money saved and run!! Everything is going to feel great compared to what you are on and choosing one or the other is not likely to result in a tangible difference in speed or ride quality. Possibly you would like the newer stuff less.

My strava times haven't improved much since getting a newer bike (which for me is 2017 Knolly warden C) compared to my 26" 2014 (knolly endorphin) on "old school geo" except for the steepest, gnarliest trails. Really it comes down to fitness and skills.

I will say the bike is a bit less "fun" and a bit more "plow". So how you envision the style you ride your bike may be a factor as well.
 

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Curious what people's thoughts are on spending ~$5000 on a new modern geo bike with mid level carbon frame and components VS buying last gen's geo with top level carbon and components for the same price.
The changes to geo are not necessarily better and the a bike that's one generation back is not necessarily worse from a geo perspective. It all depends on you, how you ride and where you ride.

Some changes like HTA can be modified fairly easily on most bikes with a new headset or changing the fork travel. Others like Reach can be tweaked by buying a bigger/smaller frame at the start.

I've had/have nice bikes from top brands in my garage from 2009, 2014, 2015 and 2018. The geo varies amongst those bikes a lot. If you told me I had to ride the 2009 bike for the rest of my riding career I would not be sad. If possible I'd size up one size and throw a -1 deg headset in the bike and upgrade parts as they wore out, but the geo is not a problem.

All that to sat don't get caught up in the hype machine telling you newer has to be better. Especially when we are talking 2019 vs. say 2017/18 product. Look at the specific differences between bikes you are keen on and evaluate them based on your specific wants/needs.
 
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