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Discussion Starter #1
I'm a 145lb XC racer who has now had 2 back surgeries (ruptured discs). I don't want to give up racing, but I now definitely need more "cushion". I have been racing my Titus Racer-X for 5 years (tricked out 23lb bomber ride) but I realize that it is more race oriented and my back won't tolerate the "harsher" ride. What has been your experience comfort wise, how do you feel about racing the SL vs your previous bike, how light can this be built with dependable parts (I currently use XO 3x10,formula oro,I9 wheelset,Masterpeice post,carbon where it is safe). What fork is best with the SL for racing. I know it's a lot of question but I trust peoples experience more than marketing jargon. My last question relates to often brought up rear "flex" has that been addressed with 2011 model year.
Thanks
 

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tefloncat said:
I'm a 145lb XC racer who has now had 2 back surgeries (ruptured discs). I don't want to give up racing, but I now definitely need more "cushion". I have been racing my Titus Racer-X for 5 years (tricked out 23lb bomber ride) but I realize that it is more race oriented and my back won't tolerate the "harsher" ride. What has been your experience comfort wise, how do you feel about racing the SL vs your previous bike, how light can this be built with dependable parts (I currently use XO 3x10,formula oro,I9 wheelset,Masterpeice post,carbon where it is safe). What fork is best with the SL for racing. I know it's a lot of question but I trust peoples experience more than marketing jargon. My last question relates to often brought up rear "flex" has that been addressed with 2011 model year.
Thanks
I came to my Mojo Sl from a Moots Cinco and a Santa Cruz SuperLight before that. I don't really have any back issues so I'm not sure I can help you much, but I give you some data points to consider.

I don't think the Mojo is a plush as the Cinco ...but it is going to depend on your shocks. The Santa Cruz --which I believe is similar to the Racer X --had less travel and I definitely noticed it. If I had real back issues, I think I would go for something even more plush than a Mojo. Just my opinion ...random as it may be.
 

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The acceleration and bump compliance of the Mojo is a few levels quicker and easy to ride faster than the Racer-x. The Mojo is about as stiff flexing as the Racer-X, not among the stiffest for sure, but plenty stiff enough for racing and about anything else.

The Racer-X has great traction and handling, but isn't really very quick for a XC racer. Kind of heavy for it's travel these days, and soft pedaling without a very firm shock. The lighter Mojo pedals much snappier and quicker with a much softer suspension set up.

Every back problem is different. I've had over 25 years of back disc problems from a car wreck. The more I ride the better my back is. The Mojo makes it easier to ride longer. I can't think of a bike both as quick and smooth on rough trail as the Mojo.
 

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Before I got my Mojo SL, I had a Titus Motolite. Similar amount of travel, but I feel the Mojo is much plusher. I have the Talas 150 fork. I think you could transfer most of your parts over as long as they fit. Don't skimp on the fork though. Better to add a bit of weight and have a smooth ride. 150mm seems perfect.

I have a mostly XT kit, and if I use lightish tires it comes in at 25.5 pounds exactly. With the parts you described on your RX, yours should be much lighter.
 

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SL sounds, to me, like the ideal bike for your situation.... much plusher, longer travel than the typical race bike, but a very efficient pedaling, quick accelerating bike. Also, Ibis doesn't do super long top tubes, which would help you get a good amount of weight on the front wheel for proper climbing and cornering performance without stressing your back with a super stretched out and low cockpit.
I think the RS Revelation XX is a monster of a long travel race fork. I've got one and it feels very light, rigid, and has excellent trail feedback.... ie. isn't super plush feeling on the small stuff. Mid to deep travel is really nice and controlled however. The hydraulic lockout is sweet too. Mine's 150mm, and I really liked the slacker steering geo....for a race setup the 140 might be more appropriate, and probably available for less money since 150 is the fashionable length now. I'm letting mine go because the arch clearance is too tight for aggressive 650b tires, but otherwise, it's a winner, and much cheaper than comparable Fox forks.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
So it seems that so far it is more plush, how is it's lateral stiffness, I'm not sure flex would be huge problem (on the road in sprints I can develope 1100W) how is standup "bob", and climbing is my forte, how much do you feel you lose (if any) with 5.5" travel vs 4" and is the center of gravity 40/60 front to back or does this change with higher travel?center of gravity. Fork wise for XC (2-3hrs), super-d (like Ashland) and longer endurance rides (50-100miles) which would YOU ride. Fox 32 Float 140RLC Kashima 15mm thru, RS Revelation XX dual position 15mm thru, or Talas 150 or 140 Terralogic 15mm thru (I have a friend who can get these at a good price for me). Again, lots of questions and yes I will be test riding an Sl locally once my MD gives me the OK to ride outside again.
Thanks Again
 

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At 145 lbs I couldn't imagine you ever having frame stiffness complaints...especially with a Thru Axle fork... all the better with a thru bolt 10x135 rear wheel. I'm 170 lbs geared up, and push it pretty hard in rough rocky terrain. It's certainly not the stiffest bike on the planet, but I only feel detrimental effects at the ragged edge of speed and G's.... offset by the way it carves and flows.
I can't comment on the new Fox forks, but both my '09 Revelation Maxle 140, and '10 Revelation xx150 are light years better than a '08 Float 140mm

Good luck
 

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If your back pain prevents you from riding with a pack you should be aware that the water bottle location is poor on the Mojo (under the down tube) so you pretty much need to carry a pack for hydration.
 

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I rode an aluminum hardtail for years. Couple that with chronic lower back issues... My back was usually in bad shape after a long ride. Since getting on the mojo, I've noticed much less back pain during and after rides. I can't say the mojo cured my back problems, but I sure do feel better physically.

I do realize that ANY full suspension bike would have probably made a big difference in the way my back feels compared to my hard tail.. But I tried a lot of bikes, and the mojo felt like it was the most balanced... climbs steep techy stuff well, with minimal bob (really undetectable unless you look down at the shock while you are pedaling) and responsive power transfer while still maintaining the comfort and traction of rear wheel travel.

Then you point it down hill- doesn't feel like a noodle in hard corners and holds a line really well. Quick handling, and not so super plush that you cant feel the trail, but good terrain feedback. It inspires confidence to push it while smoothing all the ruts and bumps and helping you keep the tires on the ground.. I've found it hard to get myself into trouble with it.

Ok, now I will stop being a toolbox for ibis.
 

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Ive got a sl and my dad has a racer x. Every now and again we switch bikes, my sl is 24 pounds and my dads x is 22 so it might have something to do with what they excel at. The both climb exceptionally but on smoother climbs the x is slightly better and on loose rocky scrambles my mojo is better. On smoother flats the x is stoopid easy to spin in 44x11 while the mojo takes a little more effort. On bumpy flats you can bomb over most anything while you gotta pick a smoother line on the x. On the downs the x feels a little sketchy compared to my mojo. Jumping, log overs, and deep ruts on the x scares me while the mojo feels like its an extention of me. On slick rock the mojo feels a little more planted on all but the saddle nose violating you so you dont loop out climbs. For what its worth both bikes are set up for 5'9" 180# stocky guys with 30" inseams but the X is a small with a 100mm sid while my mojo is a medium and I am running a fox float spaced down to 120mm. And the mojority of our rides are dry, flat (30 mile ride with 1000' gain) and ~15mph average.
Something you might want to try is an easton ec90 post as we had a yeti arc with a thompson and it was almost unridable due to the harshness till we put a carbon post on it to smooth it out and it helped alot.
In my opinion for racing you cant beat a dual air rockshox.
And flex was taken care of with the lopes link that came out a couple years ago.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks for everyones input, lots of wisdom and your not just trying to sell me an Ibis. And thanks about the CamelBack, I haven't use one done in years, I'll have to see how that treats my back, or maybe try something goofy like the water bottle holders that triatheletes use behind their saddles (hope it doesn't change flickability of a MTB).
 

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I use a seatpost-mounted water bottle cage and it works. I had one with a metal strap (can't remember the brand). Unfortunately, it snapped off when a stick got thrown up and wrenched between it and the tire. I haven't gotten around to replacing the strap, but figure it should be relatively easy to make a home-made replacement. In the mean-time, I have another seat-post bottle holder that attaches via a velcro strap. It works too, but isn't as pretty and I think it's more prone to move.

I'd be careful if you are using a carbon seatpost.

In both cases, I have to mount it fairly high to keep from buzzing the rear tire when the rear suspension fully compresses. This means that I have to use a normal-height water bottle, not one of the tall ones.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
So far what I get from the owners is it is bit more plush, "flexy" rear has been addressed, fork DON'T be cheap -maybe a revelation RS RLT ti or WC, Fox f 140,terralogic,or talas 140. How important is platform rear shock again money is not HUGE object (but I'm not made of money) but looking for best bang for the buck when it comes to comfort for back (I'm evening will to "push" front and back if this will make smoother ride).
Thanks Again
 

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I'm not a racer. Racers, please chime in. But I think racers and some very hard riders are using medium to firm tuned Fox RP23's on the Mojo for race day or all the time, to be able to stand and pedal for a majority of the ride and add support to the mid-travel of the plush suspension.

A custom tuned shock and fork from PUSH Industries would be worth the added cost for a serious racer or anyone who wants the best air shock option for your uses.
 

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tefloncat said:
So far what I get from the owners is it is bit more plush, "flexy" rear has been addressed, fork DON'T be cheap -maybe a revelation RS RLT ti or WC, Fox f 140,terralogic,or talas 140. How important is platform rear shock again money is not HUGE object (but I'm not made of money) but looking for best bang for the buck when it comes to comfort for back (I'm evening will to "push" front and back if this will make smoother ride).
Thanks Again
I'm the same weight as you riding a Mojo SL and if you want plush rear suspension go for the DT Swiss carbon rear shock.I went back and forth for months between the DT and Fox
and the DT gets better traction in slow slippery/tech conditions.For light riders this is the way to go, for heavier riders I think the Fox would be better.For forks go with a DT EXC 150 or the Revelation RLT Ti, unfortunately the WC doesn't fit the Mojo SL - only comes in a tapered steer tube:madman:
Stay away from the Fox forks, I've had 2 on my Mojo and their terrible, not very plush, dives under braking, could never get full travel, even tried lowering the air pressure to 50 psi - no luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Has anyone tried 2011 Fox vs previous year on their SL and was there any difference with the Kashima coating (if I get the SL I'm leaning towards Rev RLT Ti) also how is DT stuff long term (being light stuff last me forever). I can't wait to get the OK to ride again so I can test ride the Mojo SL
 

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tefloncat said:
Has anyone tried 2011 Fox vs previous year on their SL and was there any difference with the Kashima coating (if I get the SL I'm leaning towards Rev RLT Ti) also how is DT stuff long term (being light stuff last me forever). I can't wait to get the OK to ride again so I can test ride the Mojo SL
I have alot of time on a DT EXC 150 and no issues.
As far as the DT XR carbon shock you need to stay on top of the air can maintenance.Just remove the air can and lube up the seals with Slick Honey suspension grease. If you don't do this the black coating on the stanchion will wear off (although the shock will still work fine).
 

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Crappy Back Club

Not a racer by any means but I ride a fair bit and have two back surgeries behind me, (hairline fracture L5 resulting in blown L5/S1, etc.). That little episode took me off bikes for a while cuz I was riding HTs. Quality FS rides got be back riding. Something I've personally noticed over a few bikes in the last few years is that the "plushest" bikes I've ridden haven't been the best for my back.

I've finally realized that any quality FS ride tuned for my wieght is pretty protective of my back on the downs. What really makes a difference for my back at the end of a ride is the stability on longer climbs and stable is better than plush. Pedal bob or a soft rear end is the real killer for my back. I went from a Yeti 575 to an SL last year. The 575 was a bit longer travel and more "plush" on the downs but I'm in the saddle more on the SL climbing and I have noticed less ache at the end of the day. Both bikes have had RP23s and Talas forks (dropping the front on climbs has been a big help also - more saddle time, less wrenching the bike around on tech climbs).

My 2 cents, the more I can spin vs. mash and small/med. bump compliance has really been the key for my back. Good luck.
 
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