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The other thread got somewhat… off-topic and looks like the ban hammer came out, so I’m starting a fresh discussion to provide an update on my situation, as we’ll as provide some insight I’ve gained. That said, thank you to all who provided support and constructive advice.

Update on my situation:
  • I have no realistic hope of finding the bikes that we lost—even though the bikes are registered and I provided serial numbers to the police, they said we had a snowballs chance of getting them back. I’m still going to look at the usual suspects (CL, eBay, Pinkbike, etc..), but even if I find them posted for sale, I doubt I’ll get them back. If I do, it will be a very nice surprise.
  • Fortunately, insurance will cover most of the value of our bikes, if not all.
  • Not being able to find replacements was the biggest fear. For the most part, high-end bikes aren’t available until summer given the state of bike industry inventories. That would have been the most heartbreaking to me, because biking is such a huge part of my life and my family’s life. We're an MTB family. To add insult to injury, we had a babysitter scheduled for the day so we could have a highway 9 date but instead spent the day filing police reports and talking to insurance companies.
  • HOWEVER, thanks to the AMAZING folks at The Backcountry (my LBS in Truckee), they were able to help me piece together near perfect replicas of the SB 150 (mine) and the SB 130 (hers)—our main rides, both new to us in 2020 (hers was an Xmas present from me—only had a couple hundred miles). The new bikes are currently locked safely in my basement in Truckee guarded by sharks with lasers.
  • They are not exact replacements though— I was forced to upgrade to AXS, she was forced to upgrade to the Lunch Ride edition. Silver lining.
  • Can’t find a replacement eBike though. Probably for the best anyway--putting on too many winter pounds.
  • Also have to give a big shout out to Big Swingin’ Cycles (my LBS in SF) who of course were also super supportive and helpful with replacement Gravel/Road bikes.
  • Based on the deteriorating situation in my neighborhood (see below), I’m implementing a slew of protections to protect my family and my bikes (also below)

Update on Burglary Trends - SF’s Richmond Police District Under Siege
  • SFPD provides excellent statistics on crime, and I was able to download data from their website to analyze what’s happening in my neighborhood (I live in the Richmond Police district). I was shocked by what I learned—but I shouldn’t have been. The increasing crime in the Richmond has been reported by the SF Chronicle on a near weekly basis for months. If I had paid more attention, I could have better prepared myself.
  • So far this year (through 3/7), the San Francisco’s Richmond Police District has averaged 2.9 burglaries PER DAY. That’s a 344% increase vs. 2020—significantly larger than the 53% increase in reported burglaries citywide.
  • After hitting a low-point in February 2020, burglaries climbed at an accelerating rate through the pandemic, peaking at an average of nearly 4.0 burglaries per day from mid-December to mid-January.
  • Though burglary frequency has declined seasonally, the Richmond district is still seeing average of 3.0 burglaries per day in the first week of March.
  • Perhaps most frighteningly, “hot-prowls” (which I learned are defined as burglaries when residents are present at the time of the crime) are up 463% in 2021 compared to last year. This is what happened in my situation—we were home with our six year-old when criminals broke into our home. From the garage, they could easily have gotten into our bedrooms. SCARY.
  • It also appears that criminals are increasingly targeting single-family homes. Overall, residential burglaries are up 306% vs. last year, but burglaries against apartments and flats are up 150% while those at single-family homes were up 571%.
  • Anecdotally, based on my own conversations with victims, law enforcement, and what’s reported in the media, it seems high-end bicycles are a prime target and a key driver of the increase in crime.
Reasonable (and unreasonable) things you can do to protect your home and bikes:
  • Top Tip: IF YOU HAVE 5-FIGURES WORTH OF BIKES, CALL YOUR INSURANCE PROVIDER TODAY AND MAKE SURE THEY ARE COVERED. The coverage is not expensive. You can cover $50k worth of bikes with a fairly small deductible for a song. Fortunately, I had this coverage in place, but it is NOT the default on most insurance plans. CALL NOW.
  • My #2 recommended tip is installing an automatic lock on your garage door like this one. It’s under $100 if you have a compatible garage door opener, and automatically locks the garage whenever it’s closed, and opens it whenever you open your garage. According to LiftMaster makes your garage “virtually impenetrable.” As an alternative, you put in a simple deadbolt, but that is obviously much less convenient.
  • Make it impossible for burglars to pull the quick release on your garage door opener. This is the most common way they get it. Even if you don’t have windows on your garage (I didn’t) and even if you remove the cord from the quick release (I did), they can still get in. You can protect yourself by installing 1/8th inch steel plate on the back of your garage door, and/or secure the quick lease with zip-ties/gorilla tape.
  • Turn on Strava privacy zones around your house. I don’t know if this was factor in my house being targeting or not, but it takes 1 minute to setup. Might as well. If you want to go further, only share your rides with friends, don’t share your rides at all, delete the app, and/or or throw away your phone. I’m going with privacy zones and sharing with friends only.
  • Don’t forget about side doors and ground-level windows. Make sure they are locked and barred—would-be burglars will try them next if the garage is blocked. There are plenty of reports of windows being broken so doors can be unlocked, and in some cases doors just being kicked down.
  • Cheap motion-detecting alarms. Alarms like this on your bikes and/or garage door like this detect vibrations at sound off at 113dbs—about as loud as a chain saw. Might be enough to scare thieves off. It’s cheap, so I ordered once for each bike and the garage doo.
  • U-Locks: A cable lock might dissuade someone from grabbing a bike from an open garage, but it isn’t going to even slow down a pro who is coming prepared to steal some bikes. Thick U-Lock isn’t impenetrable, but it will likely slow thieves down, and may be effective when coupled with an alarm. I also ordered U-locks.
  • Cameras: I’m not sure how much value these are. We have a camera installed, and got some footage of the burglary (from our neighbor actually, our camera wasn’t working well). From the camera’s view point, three figures approach on foot, enter the garage in about 3 minutes, and are in and out in another 2 minutes, leaving with the bikes. They are not recognizable at all, and the police said it was of limited value.
  • Full-blown ADP alarm system: I got quoted $2,000 for setup and equipment, and $70/ month after that. You get all sorts of cameras and alarms and police notifications, but it isn’t clear that it does anything that will protect you from bike theft that you can’t accomplish through cheaper means. I’m going to pass.
  • STore your bikes inside your home (not in garage): I will do this temporarily until I've fully fortified my garage, but it just isn't realistic for our family. We count on being able to store things in our garage.
  • Move: No joke, this is the advice I got from the officer who responded to take my police report. This makes me sad. I love SF, and it’s really pathetic that it’s come to this. I get why people are leaving the city in droves. But I’m not. We are staying here for now, doing what we can to protect ourselves and our neighbors, and helping push for positive chance in every way we can.
 

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I have a Liftmaster and that lock has worked well for me.
While not advised by fire departments, deadbolts that require a key as long as you don''t have liitle ones. You can hang a key close enough to get to in an emergency, far enough away a broken window doesn't give the access.
 

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Thanks for the update. The stats are scary. Glad that you were able to get the bikes replaced relatively easily and, most importantly by far, that you and your family are safe.


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Thanks for the update. Backcountry is a good shop. The owner’s son and mine raced in the same class and age group at Northstar and Sea Otter for several years. Nice guy.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the update. Backcountry is a good shop. The owner’s son and mine raced in the same class and age group at Northstar and Sea Otter for several years. Nice guy.
Owner is a great guy. He helped me with a frame replacement over the summer—warrantied it for me and had in replaced in less than ten days for a super reasonable price. Wow. They always come through. Can’t recommend them enough.


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EAT MORE GRIME
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get a security dvr with 16 cams, and place 8 cams in obvious, impossible to miss spots
and 8 others ..well, spread them out. make it 100% known to crooks they are
being recorded because cams are everywhere. costs a lot less than bike parts cost to do this
 

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  • Not being able to find replacements was the biggest fear. For the most part, high-end bikes aren’t available until summer given the state of bike industry inventories. That would have been the most heartbreaking to me, because biking is such a huge part of my life and my family’s life. We're an MTB family. To add insult to injury, we had a babysitter scheduled for the day so we could have a highway 9 date but instead spent the day filing police reports and talking to insurance companies.
  • HOWEVER, thanks to the AMAZING folks at The Backcountry (my LBS in Truckee), they were able to help me piece together near perfect replicas of the SB 150 (mine) and the SB 130 (hers)—our main rides, both new to us in 2020 (hers was an Xmas present from me—only had a couple hundred miles). The new bikes are currently locked safely in my basement in Truckee guarded by sharks with lasers.
  • They are not exact replacements though— I was forced to upgrade to AXS, she was forced to upgrade to the Lunch Ride edition. Silver lining.
Happy to hear about this. The crew at Backcountry have been super awesome to me.
 

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Expensive bikes look expensive even to a casual bystander let alone a thief. If you lived up here in the Roseville/Auburn MTB axis you may have been prepared because you'd know many people that have lost high dollah bikes in the last 5+ years. Even if cable locked someone always has to stand guard outside Raley's at the Foresthill exit, etc... Single family homes are also prime as there is usually at least one car parked in the drive with the opener visible.

It also appears that criminals are increasingly targeting single-family homes. Overall, residential burglaries are up 306% vs. last year, but burglaries against apartments and flats are up 150% while those at single-family homes were up 571%.
 

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Good to hear that you are somewhat covered op and I hope that this was a one time event.
 

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  • Move: No joke, this is the advice I got from the officer who responded to take my police report. This makes me sad. I love SF, and it’s really pathetic that it’s come to this. I get why people are leaving the city in droves. But I’m not. We are staying here for now, doing what we can to protect ourselves and our neighbors, and helping push for positive chance in every way we can.
It is harder and harder to find a safe neighborhood with no crime. But it is well worth the peace of mind when you do.
It is nice to be able to leave your house and not worry if you locked the doors, closed the garage, set the alarm.

Glad to hear you were able to get new bikes.
 

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Thanks for your detailed post and the security tips. Stay safe and have a great season with your new (and slightly improved?) bikes!
 

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  • Full-blown ADP alarm system: I got quoted $2,000 for setup and equipment, and $70/ month after that. You get all sorts of cameras and alarms and police notifications, but it isn’t clear that it does anything that will protect you from bike theft that you can’t accomplish through cheaper means. I’m going to pass.
Take a look at SimpliSafe for an inexpensive alternative to ADT. Basic kit is ~$250, $15/mo for monitoring. It uses cellular connection, though if you want to monitor the cameras those are via WiFi. Put an entry sensor inside your padlocked breaker panel, and maybe the alarms base station on a UPS, and it is pretty robust. Motion sensor + side door entry sensor + highest value bikes chained in garage + 105db siren, and I expect I'm mostly good. Monitoring is for when we are away from home.

I'm more worried about the house getting burgled and losing priceless kid/family pics (or dealing with a ransacked house ... and I bet burglars don't take their shoes off!). Insurance can replace the rest.
 

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Thanks for the great Info. I just got done setting up the Strava privacy zone. I rarely ride out of the house but do run occasionally.

A couple of things I have always done regarding bikes in the garage.

Store out of sight.
ALWAYS keep the garage door closed. Only time it is open is when I am outside where I can keep an eye on it.
NO windows in the garage.
No manual opener at all. You have to physically pull the qr cord on the track, I remove the cords in many cases(only because my jeep is so tall it grabs them, but it is another small security detail.


I really do need to add the insurance rider.
 

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Don't ignore the front door.

Plenty of home security footage where the perps don't give a crap about being discreet and kicking in the front door. It's pretty easy unless you've done a few things to harden it.
 

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Sorry to hear about your incident, but appreciate the tips. I had bikes stolen out of my garage in So Cal a few years back. Had camera footage I gave to the police, but it led to nothing. Luckily, my insurance covered things.

I've since moved, so I definitely need to call my insurance and secure my garage better. I saw those automatic locks from Liftmaster, but need to find an equivalent for my garage door opener from Linear. I do have the Chamberlin myQ, so will be notified if the garage is opened.
 

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After reading this thread last night, I went into my garage and took the rope handle off of the quick release for the garage door. I pondered whether to zip tie it closed and whether to buy the Liftmaster garage door lock. Coincidentally, this morning I discovered that someone had entered and rifled through my car on my driveway overnight. I must have left it unlocked.
 
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