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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
okay, i know u guys are probably sick of me and my ability to not make up my mind, BUT, the reason behind wanting to sell the coiler was to have a dawg, pretty much an all mountain bike that could be hucked (cautiously) and also taken on long rides with lots of climbing. (my coiler has no eta and weighs in at 37.93 pounds)

so, my thinking was to keep the coiler and buy a king kikapu for those longer rides. then, i can have the best of both worlds....i'd have a 6" travel bike for the chunky stuff and a 4" travel bike for the longer fireroad with the less technical descents....i can get a pretty killer deal on an 07 king kikapu, so do you think it is better to have two bikes or one? the "one" would be a dawg. in the summer i ride 2-3 times per week, in the winter months i generally ride once a week.
 

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thecentralscrutinizer
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If you're doing some serious hucking, you have to have a dedicated bike for that type of riding. I wouldn't want to ride a bike with that geometry on a XC ride. I say get a second bike.
 

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bdee said:
okay, i know u guys are probably sick of me and my ability to not make up my mind, BUT, the reason behind wanting to sell the coiler was to have a dawg, pretty much an all mountain bike that could be hucked (cautiously) and also taken on long rides with lots of climbing. (my coiler has no eta and weighs in at 37.93 pounds)

so, my thinking was to keep the coiler and buy a king kikapu for those longer rides. then, i can have the best of both worlds....i'd have a 6" travel bike for the chunky stuff and a 4" travel bike for the longer fireroad with the less technical descents....i can get a pretty killer deal on an 07 king kikapu, so do you think it is better to have two bikes or one? the "one" would be a dawg. in the summer i ride 2-3 times per week, in the winter months i generally ride once a week.
I would like to have even more then 2 bikes if I could afford it...
Having 2 bikes to choose from is great. You just have to remember you can ride only one at a time. Here's the trade-off:
Having a dedicated set of bikes means you have choose what kind of riding you're going to do beforehand: "DH/bike park with shuttle - big bike OR XC/marathon/50 km trip - XC bike".
If your riding sessions involve some of everything, one "do-it-all" bike may be a better choice at the cost of not having the dedicated machine for each of the extremities. Ask yourself if the riding you like to do is more "General/go anywhere" or more "One-discipline oriented"?
As for me, my next big purchase will be another bike in addition to my Coiler.
A Coiler and a Kikapu seems like a good combination.
 

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Since you already have a "big" bike, I think you should keep it and go more XC or long ride oriented... like a King Kikapu or a Caldera if you're even considering HT.

I have one do it all, but its very XC oriented. Its getting converted to a rigid hybrid with semi-slicks and I'm getting a more rounded Kona HT.
 

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Being a three bike kind of guy, if I had to pick just one it would be the Coiler. However, it will cost a bit to get the weight down to Dawg spec without using XC kit. But if you are ready to shell out for a King Kikapu, you might consider doing the 'Coilair' upgrade.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
thanks guys. the problem with doing the coil"air" upgrade would be that i would be about 2/3's the way to the price i could get a king kikapu for. new fork and rear shock would probably cost me close to a grand right?

i know this question may have been asked in other threads here, but where can i find the weight of a king kikapu. i hunted around konaworld but couldnt find the weight of it, i found the other specs and stuff, but no weight listed where i was looking.

**found the weight, according to the 06 charts, the king kikapu comes in at 29.4 and the dawg deluxe comes in at 31.8.
 

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Gravity is cool.
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I agree with sus13 that the Coiler is the closest you'll get to a do it all bike. That's all I had for almost a year and I rode it everywhere except the high mountain epics. You should be able to get it down to 36 lbs without spending too much. Basically lighter tires and tubes will make a big difference depending on what's on it now. However, I'm a full believer in having the right bike for the job. The Coiler is great all around bike, but it's not the best for DH riding like at Whistler etc and I certainly wouldn't take it on a 40 mile ride with 10k of climbing either. That doesn't mean it can't handle park riding or big climbs, but you will be at a disadvantage in both situations if you're riding with others who have more appropriate bikes. If you can swing it, keep the Coiler and buy a true XC bike.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
thanks tad. i actually have STANS in both wheels, and am running a blue groove 2.35 up front, with the stock minion dh tire in the back. i put a thomson x4 stem on and have crank bros candy pedals on it too. it comes in at 37.93 pounds.

the king kikapu comes in at 29.4 according to the kona spec sheet. that seems a tad heavy for a 4" xc bike. the dawg comes in at 31.4 according to the kona spec sheet. it might be worth it to get that extra inch of travel for only a 1.8 pound penalty...decisions!!!!
 

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Gravity is cool.
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Well now we know where the extra weight is coming from.

My recommendation would be to go with the Kikapu at 4" of travel. Although the geometry is different between the Coiler and the Dawg, the difference between 5" & 6" isn't much. Going with a 4" travel XC bike really makes you notice the difference between that and a Coiler. My Superlight only has 4" and I really think between that and the geometry difference, the 2 bikes are so totally different. To me the Dawg and the Coiler are just to similar to justify having both. You might want to see how much of a geometry difference there is between the Dawg and the Kikapu. Part of having the right bike for the job is having bikes that are noticeably different from each other. Each of my current bikes is substantially different from the others and my 4th bike will be a DJ hardtail.
 

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bdee said:
thanks guys. the problem with doing the coil"air" upgrade would be that i would be about 2/3's the way to the price i could get a king kikapu for. new fork and rear shock would probably cost me close to a grand right?
From Universal Cycles a Pike 454 Air U, RP3 shock, and Gravity Pro 2.3 tires with current 15% discount is $1018 shipped. This should drop about 4-5 pounds off your bike and give you a bit more versatility than the Kikapu. :thumbsup:

bdee said:
i know this question may have been asked in other threads here, but where can i find the weight of a king kikapu. i hunted around konaworld but couldnt find the weight of it, i found the other specs and stuff, but no weight listed where i was looking.

**found the weight, according to the 06 charts, the king kikapu comes in at 29.4 and the dawg deluxe comes in at 31.8.
The King Kikapu is a bit heavy for a 4" travel XC bike. Also, your Coiler D has better drivetrain components. Deore shifters, cassete, fd, & chain? C'mon, Kona... King Kikapu is mid-range bike. :nono:
 
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