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some know me as mongo
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Discussion Starter · #41 ·
well here is a pic of mine all built up and ready to go. BTW the new kenda Slant6 tires are like velcro on blue groove conditions.


All i need to do now is ride one more place and i will write my review a little more in-depth.

<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/simplexityphoto/5834501396/" title="on-one 456 carbon finished by simplexityphoto, on Flickr"><img src="https://farm6.static.flickr.com/5264/5834501396_dfae66231e_o.jpg" width="1000" height="667" alt="on-one 456 carbon finished"></a>
 

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I was looking at this frame for my first real bike build up. So i will be a novice when i start to ride. I am torn between a few frame obviously. Right now its the On-One 456 carbon or the TransAm. I have my worries though of this being my first bike, how strong is the carbon. I am sure i will be falling off the bike and dropping it on awkward angles.
 

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some know me as mongo
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Discussion Starter · #45 ·
Duckman I have been riding mtn bikes for a long time now (15 years) and i have ridden pretty much all the materials but Ti (just too expensive for what you get) and I have never had a problem with any carbon part that i have owned. that being said it is important to buy good carbon and so far the 456 carbon seems to be that way. I have wrecked good a few times on the frame already and it have taken the licks like a champ. I even have my brake lever strike the top tube really hard one time, it bent the lever 90 degrees and XT levers are tough!

I will most likely be posting my more indepth review this weekend. I have gotten to ride the 2 other places in the past week.
 

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Shiggy, as a company guy, I'm aiming for you with this message, but anyone with concrete answers is welcome to chime in.

As per the On-One website, I see 67.5/71 with an unsagged 120mm fork. On Unreal's website, I see 69.5/73 for the same frame. On top of that, I've heard that this frame really shines with a 140mm or longer fork. :confused:

Can someone clear this up? Would really help, as I have solid numbers from my current frame to compare to.

Thanks much.
-E

ps - I think I saw it somewhere before on here, but any searches I try with less than 4 letter words ;) yields nothing. Guess I could try searching "four five six" but I don't think that would be useful. Heck, while we're at it: If someone knows how to get search results with shorter-than-four-letter words, I'm all ears. thx
I've ridden my 456c with a Fox 36 Talas and now with a 150mm Revelation U-Turn.
The result is that I can tell you my impressions of the bike from 110-163mm.

The Talas has three settings (110,130,160mm). 110 was way to short and made the H/A too steep. 130mm felt pretty good but I felt it needed more travel (cause you can really hammer this thing downhill). At 160mm it felt super sweet downhill in both travel and geometry but really wasn't great on flats (tended to understeer) or on up-hills is was rubbish (wandered).
So..... I switched to a Revelation which is perfect! Not only is the travel right - the axle-crow is spot on. Occasionally I'll wind it down to 140mm on smoother and more flowy trails though. This combo really works for me and the action of the Revelation blows the 36 away for both smoothness and damping.
 

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some know me as mongo
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Discussion Starter · #47 ·
gravityfreak I agree with you 100% on every account. I have owned a 36 in the past (not on this bike) and the revelation just kills it. also that said i wouldn't want the front end any higher on the 456 either. i can weight the front end just enough to have it stick well on the climb but its still high and slack enough to bomb the downhills.

I also have the revelation 150 but i have the dual air verson
 

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gravityfreak I agree with you 100% on every account. I have owned a 36 in the past (not on this bike) and the revelation just kills it. also that said i wouldn't want the front end any higher on the 456 either. i can weight the front end just enough to have it stick well on the climb but its still high and slack enough to bomb the downhills.

I also have the revelation 150 but i have the dual air verson
Mine is the Team Dual Air - U-Turn with the Blackbox Motion Control so I think it's the same as yours with the exception of the u-turn.

You're looks like a nice build. What's she weigh?

This bike makes me want to go riding more than any bike before - I feel like a bit evalgelical about it!
 

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Ordered mine today, 18" black, and had planned on buying a 36 for it. Now you have me second guessing that. The Revelation is about a pound lighter.... I think I just like the look of the 36 stanchions though?!
 

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Discussion Starter · #50 ·
gravityfreaky you are right mine is the one with the blackbox internals but i just about never use the motion control at all but i probably will more on this bike than the full sussy. I am also playing around with the idea of trying a 1x10 setup as well. might help me get into shape quicker and it would be something nice to try. i have a tendency to stay in the saddle too much.

Weaver84. I would not buy a 36 for this bike. the 36 is strong and stout that is for sure but i have never been impressed with its performance as a trail fork that need small bump compliance. I also think that most people will have a hard time putting the revelation through its paces to the point of failure. I weight 260 without gear and i'm considered a hard rider as well. I have not had a single peep out of the fork letting me know it was being overwelmed in anyway. I would save money, loose weight, and gain performance by getting a 150mm fork instead. i think you will be impressed with the bike. it can be biuld pretty freakin light for how hard you can ride it.
 

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Ordered mine today, 18" black, and had planned on buying a 36 for it. Now you have me second guessing that. The Revelation is about a pound lighter.... I think I just like the look of the 36 stanchions though?!
Granted, I come from a more trail/XC direction, My 456 Carbon has a Pike 454 U-Turn fork (95-140 coil) on it. On more open, wideish, rough trails the 140 setting is fine. On narrow trails it wanders a bit (uncomfortably so at speed) and tracks better around 120mm. I think a more adjustable fork might cure some of the longer setting issues.

As is, at 140mm I have been able to fly though some rough rocky/rutted areas like on no other bike. More willing to take flight, too.
 

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How the heck you do not use compression damping at all? Maybe you are not using lockout?
I next to never turn mine from the fully off position, so rarely use the Motion Control damper, never ever ever ever use the Fork in the Lockout position then use the Threshold system to open it up and don't know anyone who does actually use the fork like this, although I have the fork setup soft enough locked to make this useable.

Mate was selling 1 with barely a few rides on it, I was tempted to replace my steel 456, but being able to bend the top tube easily with 1 finger puts me off, be nice in a nads to top tube impact though :)


Doesn't look as perty in real life as in the photo's either sadly!!
 

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I next to never turn mine from the fully off position, so rarely use the Motion Control damper
If it is open - it is working for. It is quite nicer then regular Motion Control. It has separate low speed and high speed compression circuits, and also Blackbox forks use shimmed rebound damper as opposed to the standard Motion Control's port orifice damper. Second one is probably more important.
 

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Mate bought the forks, I was going to but bought his Pace RC41 Fighters, who's bushes ride 1 died :(

Really nice forks, not overly divey for there travel and being air ( more so than the RC41's though ) , shame it's a bit of a con as the High speed compression is internally adjustable only.

Rev 150mm RL Ti's I think there code was, from On One for £400, ridden the ones from the 456 Carbon deal to, but only briefly.
 

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Weaver84. I would not buy a 36 for this bike. the 36 is strong and stout that is for sure but i have never been impressed with its performance as a trail fork that need small bump compliance. I also think that most people will have a hard time putting the revelation through its paces to the point of failure. I weight 260 without gear and i'm considered a hard rider as well. I have not had a single peep out of the fork letting me know it was being overwelmed in anyway. I would save money, loose weight, and gain performance by getting a 150mm fork instead. i think you will be impressed with the bike. it can be biuld pretty freakin light for how hard you can ride it.
Thank you sir for the response, on my full squish I run a Revelation and can only think of twice when I actually felt it bottom, but I was running it pretty soft. I'm looking forward to building it, will post the build in the on one forum. I'm planning on initially setting it up as a SS and like the idea of having the pop lock feature that is offered on the xx --
 

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some know me as mongo
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Discussion Starter · #58 ·
nope it is true i leave the low speed compression in its softest setting. It does not dive at all (or that bothers me) I have setup the lockout so if i feel the desire to use it, but to date i have not. As for the high speed compresson i have that set to what ever the factory put it at. I like the setting and have no desire to change it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #59 ·
ok well here we go for a midterm review:

Once again I am NOT a sponsored rider (though that would be sweet :p) I bought this frame with my own money, had it shipped thousands of miles, and built it in my garage. I also am very picky in bikes. I have ridden many frames and change some just because they sucked and other because I wanted to "just because". I ride XC/All-mountain exclusively now, but have ridden everything from XC race to hardcore DH in my past. I lose flying down steeps through bad sections and tough lines.

First I would like to say that I have had some chain suck issues with my driveline while shifting the front chainrings. This should not have anything to do with this frame but I have used both of the ring setups on my previous bike with no issues. I am going to write that off just as bad luck. I am going to divide this review into two sections, the first being on smooth flowy trails and the second on some pretty rough trails.

SMOOTH TRAILS:

This bike just plain hauls on the smoother flowy trails. The geo is just spot on, this makes the bike very stable at speed but allows it to be proficient in the twisties at all speed, even when you are having to ratchet the cranks you are going so slow. The shortest chainstays allow the bike to pump well in the turns and on little things in the trail. this all just adds to the bike ability to just haul on fast flowy trails.

The frame is also very stiff when you mash on the pedals which is nice coming from a full sussy frame. Just lets you know that you are not wasting your energy onto the suspension at all. That being said it does take some time to relearn to ride a bit, main for bunny hops and what not.

Climbing. Its a hardtail, on the smooth any hardtail climbs very well as long as you have enough tire to grip. The only thing to note here is that the front end on the frame is low enough to keep the front end on the ground. This is just barely with a 150mm fork on the frame. A tall 150mm or pretty much any 160mm fork I feel would put the front end up too high for effective climbing.

THE ROUGH:

Once again the geo is very good for a hardtail on the rough but this bike does remind you that there so no rear suspension with out a doubt. The frame is once again stiff, which is nice because it keeps you on your line and allows you to pen sections. The only really issue is on the longer downhills because you have to pay attention 100% because the bike will go very fast on the downs because it tracks so well. This leads to making the rider more tried quicker and will cause arm pump. Basically from time to time you will have to slow down on the downhill just to recover.


Climbing. once again its a hardtail so when you pedal hard the bike want to move! but on rough technical uphills there are two huge twist, line and traction! Both of these can be helped and hindered by a bikes geo. This also goes hand in hand with rider preference. Once again the bikes geo is very good for climbing, this actually surprised me to a bit because of the very slack head angle, high bb, and tallish front end. this is combined with my need of a relatively high handle bar do to my height. Even with all of these factors and a stupid steep hill the front end still stayed glued to the ground. this hill is so steep they called it Cadillac Hill because unless you are truckin with the momentum of a Caddi you probably will not make it. this same trail also have some very technical climbs that really require you to find "The Line" and this frame made it fairly easy to due. this is because while the front end stay on the ground very well it is still easy to "pick up" and move around when needed.

While i am very happy with the ride quality of the bike i still have some issues with the frame. First! and this is a big one the frame NEEDS a chainstay strike plate for the chain. if you ever get chain suck, and lets not kid ourselves here. you can very easily seriously damage the driveside chain stay. I even had to make a protector myself to prevent farther strike from causing more than cosmetic damage. this is not hard if you have some double sided foam tape and some sheet metal (if you go to a hobby shop you can get stainless steel sheets). the second thing is that i really feel the All-mountain frames should have ISCG mounts on them, even if they are not bask rated. I will be trying a single ring setup in the near future and this makes things much nicer and cleaner on setup. the only other thing i will complain about is the finish quality. while it is not horrible it is still not all that nice either. while this is not a big deal (its a mtn bike after all) it doesn't have that WOW factor when it comes out of the box or when you build it.

Now with the good. The bike rides just great! Seriously it does! If hard to find a place that the bike has not excelled in, the only issue here is the rider. The frame really rewards the rider for pushing it and I feel that it will be able to take the beating for a good long time. The frame feel solid when you are pushing yourself on the trails. I have done some small drops (under 3 feet) and it feels good and stiff on landing. I have wrecked a few times now and once I have my brake lever strike the toptube very hard (the lever bent almost 90%) and all it did was put a very small surface scratch in the toptube. The dropout on this frame are SWEET! I just love them and the fact that they have three different types is awesome as well. The thought that went into the frames design is evident in so many locations (besides the above mentioned items). I think if they just make some very small tweaks to the build of the frame they would have one very hardtail to beat when it come to All-mountain frames.

If I think of anything else I want to say later I will be sure to post it here. I will mostly give updates has I have a chance to ride even more trails and different setups.

Feel free to post questions and comments. You will never know if you don't ask
 
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