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I'm looking at getting a new bike this year and different models have different brakes. One has 525s, the next is LX and then XT. I'm also thinking about building up with Avids. I don't need superlight but I want Clyde approved durability. WHat do you guys like?
 

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The Duuude, man...
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mrgorth said:
I'm looking at getting a new bike this year and different models have different brakes. One has 525s, the next is LX and then XT. I'm also thinking about building up with Avids. I don't need superlight but I want Clyde approved durability. WHat do you guys like?
If you are buying a whole bike, then take whatever comes on it.

If you are upgrading a set, the discussion becomes a lot more complex. The decision at that point is mostly financial. Spend as much as you can is a good rule of thumb.
 

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MTB Rider
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If they're mechanical ...

ncj01 said:
If you are buying a whole bike, then take whatever comes on it.

If you are upgrading a set, the discussion becomes a lot more complex. The decision at that point is mostly financial. Spend as much as you can is a good rule of thumb.
If they're mechanical, there is no question, Avid BB7.

Hydros is a BIG discussion.
 

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I second the Avids

mrgorth said:
Thanks. I don't seem to find them anywhere on the web. Where should I be looking?
I run 185 mm front and rear. You should have no problem finding them on the internet, not sure why you're having a problem. For 2005, Avid makes 2 different models, BB5 and BB7. Go with the BB7 recommendation, as they have pad adjustment capabilities that the BB5 don't have.

With all this said, if you purchase a bike that already has discs, don't go to the expense of swapping out what it comes with for the Avids, unless the LBS gives you a decent deal on the swap. Shimano LX and XT hydros (2 models you mentioned) will suit your needs too. It's all a matter of preference.

Clyde.
 

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mrgorth said:
I'm looking at getting a new bike this year and different models have different brakes. One has 525s, the next is LX and then XT. I'm also thinking about building up with Avids. I don't need superlight but I want Clyde approved durability. WHat do you guys like?
I am running Shimano M555 Hydros with XT rotors on my Stumpy Comp HT. They work really well for the light/moderate trail and XC stuff I do. I am thinking that when they wear out I will be looking at something Hayes with 8" rotors, just for something different and maybe more trail oriented. I weigh ~230# in case you're wondering.

I think that most any disc brake, mech or hydro, with a 6" or greater rotor will do fine for us Clydes as long as they are set up right. If you're planning on doing a lot of steep descents, maybe plan on getting something with 8" rotors in the future.
 

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Check the review section

mrgorth said:
And the Deore brakes are mechanical right? How do the LX and XTs compare to Avid BBs and Juicys?
I believe that Shimano's newer Deore is hydraulic. I have a set of the Deore BR-M515-LA mechanicals on my Ibex street bike, and they're a good brake. As for comparing the Avid mechanicals and/or Juicy's to Shimano's LX, XT or other products, check the product review section and some of the other posts in this forum.

Again, it appears to be a matter of taste and preference, kind of like the "air vs coil" suspension argument. Both work very well, but which do you prefer? Read up on the reviews, the posts here, and the FAQ section of the Brakes forum that discusses disc brakes. Other than that, try out a few bikes at the LBS that have the different brake systems you're choosing between. That would give you hands on information to help you decide.

Again, for ME, I like the (perceived) simplicity that mechanical disc brakes offer. It could be that hydraulics are "set it and forget it", but I've seen more posts with people having problems bleeding, getting them set up, etc. so why would I change?

Again, that's just me.

Clyde
 

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The Duuude, man...
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mrgorth said:
And the Deore brakes are mechanical right? How do the LX and XTs compare to Avid BBs and Juicys?
If you are talking Mechanicals, there is NO Discussion, NO comparison, NOTHING even close to Avid's. Period. Done. Finitito'.

However, if you are talking Hydro's, it's a seperate and lengthy disuccssion with a lot of very good choices. Basic's like anything from Shimano, or the Juicy 5's & 7's are all very good performers. Again, spend as much as you can feel comfortable with, you'll be happy.

If you want crazy bling, get Hopes, Magura's, XTR (required integrated shifter), or the new Hayes El Camino (don't get the Hayes HFX series).

Want more power no matter which brake you choose? Increase rotor size.
 

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The Duuude, man...
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mrgorth said:
And the bottom line is that all of these are superior to V brakes right?
Kindof.

When all are properly adjusted, and appropriately worn in (takes several rides), they will be:

a) stronger with same amount of lever force

b) more resistant to lessening performance due to the elements (or massive DH runs)

c) heavier, unless you throw down 400+ bucks on some major bling bling disc brakes.

However, wether those things make it "superior" or not is up to you. For instance, if you're into XC only riding in dry climates, it's probably a mute point, and therefore not superior.
 

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Avids mech.all the way! You do need to get the bigger rotors though. My first set were 160mm and they Blew big time. No power and the pads lasted no time. I sold that set and went back to Vs. After a year or so I tried again with 203s this time. What a difference! They are awsome.
 

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For a lightweight ...

ncj01 said:
Kindof.

When all are properly adjusted, and appropriately worn in (takes several rides), they will be:

a) stronger with same amount of lever force

b) more resistant to lessening performance due to the elements (or massive DH runs)

c) heavier, unless you throw down 400+ bucks on some major bling bling disc brakes.

However, wether those things make it "superior" or not is up to you. For instance, if you're into XC only riding in dry climates, it's probably a mute point, and therefore not superior.
For a lightweight rider who rides primarily in dry conditions, discs are indeed optional equipment.

For Clydes, I think you're nuts if you're still running on rims. Big guys need more braking power. You get it by squeezing hard against your brake. And if your on Vs, that pressure ends up on your rims.

Yeah, and Clydes knock their wheels out of true a lot more than lightweights. A wobbly rim means a dragging brake.

By contrast, disc rotors are pretty easy to true.

Clydes should be on discs. V-brakes are for the little guys.
 

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The Duuude, man...
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willtsmith_nwi said:
For a lightweight rider who rides primarily in dry conditions, discs are indeed optional equipment.

For Clydes, I think you're nuts if you're still running on rims. Big guys need more braking power. You get it by squeezing hard against your brake. And if your on Vs, that pressure ends up on your rims.

Yeah, and Clydes knock their wheels out of true a lot more than lightweights. A wobbly rim means a dragging brake.

By contrast, disc rotors are pretty easy to true.

Clydes should be on discs. V-brakes are for the little guys.
You're mostly right. There are ways around it, like getting a heavier duty ceramic coated rim, ceramic v brake pads, etc...of course by then you're up in cost and may as well buy some discs.

As someone posted, Hayes are probably the best bang for the buck in a hydro, or a mech for that matter...figure 130-140 on ebay for an as-new set of Hayes Hydro's. El Camino's are new for 05 and very expensive though...
 

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The Sentinel
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I second the bigger rotors

I'm a fattie (250 s/gear), and I have a set of Hayes hydraulic discs on my full suspension trail bike, and Avid mechanicals on my hard tail. I like both sets of brakes, but I end up truing my rotors after almost every ride on both sets. I think I generate enough heat that they get warped. A bigger rotor should (theoretically) help dissipate the heat better, so I'm going to try the 185s on my Avids.
 

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I have both the Hayes mag 8" (DH bike) and Avid 8" mechs on my xc/freeride hardtail. I had the Avid 6" mechs on a previous xc bike. The 8" hydros have the best stopping power but for any xc/freeride application the 8" Avids work great. I'm 6'1" about 250 lbs and feel the Avid 8" mech would be the best performance value for a big rider who isn't doing full on DH. I would get the 8" rotors though as the 6" left me wanting more on steeper or faster sections. The Avids are user friendly and easy to adjust as well.

SJ
 

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A few last thoughts.

Sorry I came into this discussion so late and the guys here have touched on a few of the issues involved in choosing the "right brakes" but I'd like to clear a few things up that seem... well, vague.

If you are riding areas where the terrain does not include long, steep downhills, stick to the XC style of brakes. If you are going to be climbing for half an hour and then flying down a lengthy series of descents without pause, you should look at something that dissipates heat a little better.

Avids with the 8" rotors are great… I have a set on my racing hardtail (8" on the front and 6" on the rear) and would not trade them for any other brake, but for my Freeride bike, Hayes hydros were the only choice. For the long, brutal downhills, the hydros do not fade and stand up to a lot more abuse overall.

Look at the type of riding you'll be doing and good luck with your purchase… and let us know what happens (with pictures). ;)

CA -
 
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