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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Yesterday I rode Canada Del Oro on my old '00 Cannondale F-something hard tail that I had given to my Wife. I had a blast! I don't know if I had so much fun, because I hadn't ridden Canada in a while, or I had forgotten what it was like riding a hard tail, or maybe a little of both? My usual ride, a '05 FSR Stumpjumper is in the shop having its pivot bearings replaced. I wanted to ride yesterday, and the old Cannondale was my only choice. Honestly, I've never considered riding the bike, and I didn't have high hopes for the ride.

What I think it was, is one, the stiffness of the rigid frame and the trail response you get from it. Secondly, my old bike has low rolling-resistant tires (Specialized Fast Track Sports), it is only a 24-speed and it has v-brakes whereas I am used to disc brakes. I really had to use my weight to get the tires to grip during cornering and to assist the v-brakes in stopping. Of course, I missed the extra cogs during the climbs ;) But, it was like I was more engaged in the ride than I have been with my full-suspension bike. I'll definitely be riding that bike more often, at least for trails such as Canada Del Oro or Kennedy etc.
 

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I ride my 1986 RockHopper Comp 1X9 (with cantilever brakes and all) at STCP all the time: up and down Rocky Ridge, Stile Ranch, etc.... IT DON'T MATTER! I love that bike, even broke a few personal records with it. I modernized it a little, but the frame and fork are still the same - awesome.

 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Awesome pic, Dion, and awesome bike. I guess if I gave the hard tail another chance, I could try more technical trails as well.

What size tires those, and do they rub at all?
 

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Awesome pic, Dion, and awesome bike. I guess if I gave the hard tail another chance, I could try more technical trails as well.

What size tires those, and do they rub at all?
Dude, I am running a Forté Tsali 2.2 in the back and a Forté Pisgah 2.3 in the front. The 2.2 in the rear barely is in there, but on my 1988 KHS Montana Pro, a 2.0 works perfectly. I run pretty low air pressures, even with tubes.

I went with a 30" wide handlebar, which modernized the handling a bit, and upgraded the cantilevers. As long as it doesn't get ridiculously bumpy, this bike works great for basic XC type riding. Also, the drivetrain is completely modern. The wheels are cheap Vuelta Pro's (they were, like $99): they are heavy as all hell, but I just can't seem to kill them.

The Tektro canti's are great, but the pads are awful. Time for some Kool Stops.

I love it. It's like riding a fat tire cyclocross bike, and when you have to stand to climb, the rigid is great! I was in the air about buying a modern, rigid steel frameset, but I got this for $50! Works great for a 26 yr. old bike, and I get a lot of compliments from those "in the know".
 

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That's one of my fave bikes. I got for 20 bucks run it at 22x11 and added wider bars.

It's been to Tamarancho, China Camp, JMP, but I mostly ride it on loops around Redwood Regional with my dogs.

great winter bike.
 

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We're climbing Nisene tomorrow on the old steels. Had to adjust a few things for my wife to ride the KHS; I love the 80's.

Tire Bicycle frame Bicycle tire Wheel Bicycle wheel
 

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A friend of mine just got this '94 Foes, and since it was a 1 1/4 head tube I threw on my old Hanebrink forks. It was a blast and I smiled to whole time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·

That's one of my fave bikes. I got for 20 bucks run it at 22x11 and added wider bars.

It's been to Tamarancho, China Camp, JMP, but I mostly ride it on loops around Redwood Regional with my dogs.

great winter bike.
Buzkil, what year is your RockHopper? Yeah, there are some must-have upgrades. I am on the hunt for shorter stems (and probably flater-wider bars) for my Cannondales. I like one-finger operation for braking, but I cannot move the levers in-board with the shorter bars of the older bikes. Also, a shorter stems allows for a more up-right riding position, which you can alter slightly by changing your grip (for climbing or descending) on a wider handlebar. These, and new tires and these bikes are good to go!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
A friend of mine just got this '94 Foes, and since it was a 1 1/4 head tube I threw on my old Hanebrink forks. It was a blast and I smiled to whole time.
Holy crap! That thing probably has more travel than my '05 Stumpjumper. It's looks to be in great shape. Speaking of forks, I have an ealy 90s Manitou 2 fork, which I think may fit my '94 Cannondale. The original elastomers melted (weird), but a quick search on Google looks like there may be a couple of stores online that sell replacement kits.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
We're climbing Nisene tomorrow on the old steels. Had to adjust a few things for my wife to ride the KHS; I love the 80's.

View attachment 736483
Are you guys descending Nisene? I remember the first time I rode Nisene was on my old Cannondale. We started the descent and it was fun, but towards the middle-end I was getting pretty beat up on my hard tail. That was when I started thinking I need a full-suspension bike.
 

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Are you guys descending Nisene? I remember the first time I rode Nisene was on my old Cannondale. We started the descent and it was fun, but towards the middle-end I was getting pretty beat up on my hard tail. That was when I started thinking I need a full-suspension bike.
I descend Rocky Ridge on that bike. :D

Nisene is a dirty road ride. The only bike I'll climb and descend Nisene on is my cyclocross bike. Personally, I think a mountain bike is a bit too much for those fire roads. :p
 

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Buzkil, what year is your RockHopper? Yeah, there are some must-have upgrades. I am on the hunt for shorter stems (and probably flater-wider bars) for my Cannondales. I like one-finger operation for braking, but I cannot move the levers in-board with the shorter bars of the older bikes. Also, a shorter stems allows for a more up-right riding position, which you can alter slightly by changing your grip (for climbing or descending) on a wider handlebar. These, and new tires and these bikes are good to go!
I believe it is a 1993. First thing I did when I got it was tear it down, clean and lube it. since I changed my other SS to a 1x9 I am going to put a chain tensioner on this guy too.
 

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I'm bias, but older bikes are a blast to ride. The challenge is building them full period correct and then pushing them to the limits.
 

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I've put thousands of miles on my 1992 Kestrel. There is a lot to be said for a rigid rear triangle. You definitely feel more connected to the trail, but cannot get away with as many ham fisted mistakes as I can on my Yeti 575.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I believe it is a 1993. First thing I did when I got it was tear it down, clean and lube it. since I changed my other SS to a 1x9 I am going to put a chain tensioner on this guy too.
I was thinking about a chain tensioner as well. I was actually looking at c.guide
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I've put thousands of miles on my 1992 Kestrel. There is a lot to be said for a rigid rear triangle. You definitely feel more connected to the trail, but cannot get away with as many ham fisted mistakes as I can on my Yeti 575.
True that!
 

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I have an old 1983 shwinn side winder that i ride on the road and like (flat) trails. It's so much fun to ride. Running a single speed set up and welded on bosses for v-brakes. Aloows me to keep up with my gf's fancy new fixie lol
 

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Let's see. I think I hate all new bikes, or I just can't afford them. That's why I sold all my 'newer' bikes.

Old bike number 1: My do it all thing. Early 80's Raleigh that made it's way across the pond at some point in it's life as it was never actually sold in North America. Skinny knobbies, modern bits. Most fun bike I've ever owned.



Old bike number 2: 1997? GT Tequesta commuter rig. It's mine. It's rad. Expect to see it with knobbies and fenderless on Kennedy come turkey day. It's heavy, sluggish and yeah, heavy, but the 3x7 is bulletproof and it's great.



Old bike number 3: Supgirl's mid 80's Nishiki. Heavy and commuteriized with 35c's and stuff. It's rad.



Old bike number 4: By far the newest of the bunch, I built this thing for supgirl. The Nishiki (above) was a great starter bike, but turned into a flat bar commuter. Having no real roadie, the C'Dale was built and today was her first ride on it. Let's just say that a nicely built bike that weighs just around 19 pounds even with some heavy bits has reignited her interest in riding on the road.

 

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My 1990 Rockhopper. Not much is stock, except for the frame, fork, and wheels. I have the parts, but the fit is not quite right. The bike is 1 size too small.

I used to ride everywhere with it, did things from MTB to road. I treat it much like a CX bike.
 

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Gary Fisher 1990 Montare

I got a good deal on this locally. It's way too small for me (small size frame), but I bought anyway assuming I would find a local rider who wanted a good deal on a classic. Just about everything is original on this -I think just chain & tires have been replaced.

PM for more info

Here's an interesting tidbit I found when researching the bike:
file:///Users/NFLaptop/Documents/Photos_Laptop/Canon_S100/Gary_Fisher_Montare/Trusty%20Steed.webarchive
 

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