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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I bought this bike back in 2001
http://www.bikepedia.com/QuickBike/BikeSpecs.aspx?Year=2001&Brand=Trek&Model=820&Type=bike

I rode it a little then kept it in the garage for a couple years finally I gave it away. The guy I gave it to never rode it. I am about to buy a new bike and I have two teenagers one is way into riding and has his own bike the other is kinda indeffernt but we dont want to leave her out.(She is the exact same height as me and this bike will fit her.) I asked the guy about the bike and he gave it back to me but it needs some love.

Is there anything I can do to this bike to make it so it can be rode occasionally and still be an enjoyable ride for her. What do you guys suggest. I have heard the fork was never good to start with. I have no idea how the rest of the bike is working I just picked it up tonight and it has flat tires.

How do you know what if anything is compatible with it. Is it worth fixing up or should I just save the money and buy a differnt bike for occasional use.
 

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Former Bike Wrench
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15,976 Posts
Lube up the drivetrain, pump up the tires (probably just flat from sitting, tubes do leak air over time) and make sure that everything is working. The fork was never intended for anything beyond neighborhood rides so there isn't much to do there.

Bike should be fine for occasional bike path and dirt road use
 

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Geaux ride!
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I had the 2000 model of this bike, it got me started on this whole mountain bike obsession I have now. I put some miles on decent trails, the only thing that ever failed was the derailleur (not really it's fault, a branch jammed it).

Like mtnbiker72 said, lube up everything and maybe check the alignment/adjustment of the derailleurs. I know my cables had to be adjusted more than once to keep everything working right. I wouldn't bother buying something new, unless the frame has large amounts of rust. This is a great bike for what you want to use it for.
 

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It's about showing up.
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The bike model is not the question per se

but how well it operates. I understand that your daughter may not ride much but for the times she does ride having a machine that is gritty, balky or otherwise clumsy to operate is a miserable experience. A marginal rider will just give up, and rightly so, as they will feel the need to endure rather than enjoy.

Bikes that sit around for years are notoriously encrusted with dried lubricants and oxidations which make them perform terribly. If you want this bike to serve a productive purpose the whole bike needs attention; deep cleaning, cables, housings, maybe tubes, full lubrication everywhere and a tune-up. Saddles have been much improved for specific anatomy and bars/stems have been changed to better accommodate the real needs of entry-level riders. As such these could change, too. Otherwise you are doing your daughter no service and inviting her to stay home.

This sort of work can be costly in terms of elbow grease and mechanics. My guess is about $150 at a shop or about $40-$50 if you can do it yourself and still you may have to fiddle with it.

Having said that, she might be one of those girls who sally forth undaunted by anything and kick your tail one day. That, however, is rare with girl cyclists. I sense that this is rather an issue of enjoyment at this stage.

Best wishes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for all the help.

Maybe what I am going for is for her to get discouraged I have two little kids that need a babysitter.
 
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