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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've moved my components from my old frame to the new; the old frame had a chain-stay length of 16.9", the new one is 16.7". I forgot to consider this initially and just slapped the old chain back on at the same length. While it's mostly working okay, I do get some occasional slippage, which I'm now suspecting is caused by the chain being too long. Any quick suggestions on how many links I should remove?

On a related note, do I really need one of those replaceable links or can I just shorten and replace the pin? It's a 3x8 Shimano setup.
 

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DPDISXR4Ti said:
I've moved my components from my old frame to the new; the old frame had a chain-stay length of 16.9", the new one is 16.7". I forgot to consider this initially and just slapped the old chain back on at the same length. While it's mostly working okay, I do get some occasional slippage, which I'm now suspecting is caused by the chain being too long. Any quick suggestions on how many links I should remove?

On a related note, do I really need one of those replaceable links or can I just shorten and replace the pin? It's a 3x8 Shimano setup.
The slippage is more likely because the chain and/or cassette are worn and need replacing.
 

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as shiggy says, new chain, middle ring and poss. cassette
no you cant re use the pin, get a new pin or a quick link
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
shiggy said:
The slippage is more likely because the chain and/or cassette are worn and need replacing.
While it wouldn't be a bad idea to get a new chain, bear in mind, these exact components were in use a couple weeks ago on my old bike without issue.
 

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DPDISXR4Ti said:
While it wouldn't be a bad idea to get a new chain, bear in mind, these exact components were in use a couple weeks ago on my old bike without issue.
old components will work ok together because they have worn in together, but when the chain wears it becomes longer which in turn wears out the gears and cogs, once they are all worn they no longet fit together as they should resulting in shifting issues and chain suck, chain drop, etc.
measure your chain 12" from pin to pin, if its over by 1/8" or more you need a new chain, way more and youll also need new rings and maybe cassette
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
dan0 said:
measure your chain 12" from pin to pin, if its over by 1/8" or more you need a new chain, way more and youll also need new rings and maybe cassette
Just to be clear on this one, is the length of a link supposed to be exactly 1" then? I understand how measuring the chain over a greater length multiples the wear and makes the problem easier to diagnose - just want to make sure I've got a full handle on what you're saying.

Thanks...
 

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DPDISXR4Ti said:
Just to be clear on this one, is the length of a link supposed to be exactly 1" then? I understand how measuring the chain over a greater length multiples the wear and makes the problem easier to diagnose - just want to make sure I've got a full handle on what you're saying.

Thanks...
no , measure a 12" section of the chain, starting at a pin, on a good chain the 12" mark should be on another pin, if its off by 1/8" or more the chain is worn out, most people change the chain when it gets 1/8" over, that way it hasnt worn the chain rings and cassette too badly. I usually get a whole riding season on 2 chains and 1 middle ring, my cassettes last several years. I average around 2000 miles a year+- , if you ride in wet or dirty conditions your life may differ
 

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DPDISXR4Ti said:
While it wouldn't be a bad idea to get a new chain, bear in mind, these exact components were in use a couple weeks ago on my old bike without issue.
Old components on a new frame may not work the same. The shorter CS change the chain angle which can be more sensitive to wear. Add in that the the BB drop is likely different and that affects how the parts interact.
 

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DPDISXR4Ti said:
Just to be clear on this one, is the length of a link supposed to be exactly 1" then? I understand how measuring the chain over a greater length multiples the wear and makes the problem easier to diagnose - just want to make sure I've got a full handle on what you're saying.

Thanks...
To bring this back to you original question:
The 0.2" shorter CS means the chain could be about 0.4" shorter (.2 on the top run and .2 on the bottom). A full link of chain needs to removed to shorten it. One full link has two pins and is 1 inch long. If your chain was slightly long on the old bike you cound shorten the chain. If it was slighty short, you can not. Chain length is rarely exactly "right".
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
shiggy said:
To bring this back to you original question:
The 0.2" shorter CS means the chain could be about 0.4" shorter (.2 on the top run and .2 on the bottom). A full link of chain needs to removed to shorten it.
Not that I mind the discussion, but thanks for answering the original question. :D
 

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First off.. chain length, What Shiggy said is probably correct but it's best to just take the chain, wrap around largest ring front and back and add 2 links...guessing he's right and you'll drop a full link

As to wear and slippage, as Shiggy also stated the placement change of the chainrings angle of attack to the cassette and such changes with Bottom bracket heights and such. One major thing also is the "B" screw adjustment will more than likely need to be changes as no two hangers set the rear derailleur at the exact same angle of attack spot to the cassette. Also make sure the new bike's hanger didn't get bent during shipping and such... seen MANY that do get bent slightly and need to be tweeked back

as to the quick link.. it's WAY better to use a quick link over a push pin. allows you do work on the chain/bike later, easier, stronger,..yes they are stronger than a shimano replacement pin as 90% of the time the new pin never gets set 100% properly ..and the outer link's never hold as tightly do to basic changes in the actual hole size from removal and repressing a new pin. I've seen more than one chain fail at the new pin, never seen a replaceable link fail yet.
 
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