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I have noticed on chainlove there is allot of different bike jerseys for sale, at what appear to be pretty high prices. I checked out some long sleeve jerseys at a local shop and it appears to be something like a cross between a Nike wick-away type material and an underarmor short. I could basically buy the same thing at a Nike store for like $20-25.
But this one had a bike company logo on it and was $92.
When screening through chainlove jsut now they had a long sleeve santa cruz jersey at about $50, half the original price.

What am I missing by just wearing t-shirts when I ride and why are these things so damned expensive? Is there a benefit to wearing a jersey that I am not aware of?
 

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madsedan said:
I have noticed on chainlove there is allot of different bike jerseys for sale, at what appear to be pretty high prices. I checked out some long sleeve jerseys at a local shop and it appears to be something like a cross between a Nike wick-away type material and an underarmor short. I could basically buy the same thing at a Nike store for like $20-25.
But this one had a bike company logo on it and was $92.
When screening through chainlove jsut now they had a long sleeve santa cruz jersey at about $50, half the original price.

What am I missing by just wearing t-shirts when I ride and why are these things so damned expensive? Is there a benefit to wearing a jersey that I am not aware of?

Other than the tech fabrics....a good bike jersey has three large rear pockets, those pockets are enough to carry everything you need except for water....so if you use bottles instead of hydropacks, you can save the weight of a back pack...800 grams or so.
 

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Nice, I had no idea, thanks for the info, thats exactly what I needed to know.
I just assumed they were overpriced poly blend t-shirts.
 

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Semi-Hairless Sasquatch
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The other potential advantage is the cut. A well designed cycling jersey that fits won't restrict, bunch, rub or flap around in the wind as much as a tech tee will. They don't need to be skin tight to do so if they're sized in a way that fits your proportions. They usually have a drop tail as well that helps cover up the plumbers crack area when you're bent over the bars (I usually wear bibs though so not as much of an issue for me). The zippered front also allows for quick and easy core temperature modulation while pedaling.

They seem to be more of a necessity to me on the road bike than my MTB, but the single back pocket, slightly more relaxed fit, and half zip front of the MTB jerseys I've got do have some functional advantages over a tech tee to me.

I would definitely agree w/ you though that the pricing difference between UA/Adidas/etc. tech tees and cycling specific jerseys is quite a bit to swallow at first, but it's a lot more of a niche industry and it seems like good cycling jerseys have probably had a good deal more R&D go into the designs and fabrics used than your average tech tee.
 

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Trying not to kill myself
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I'm a runner and I have lots of SS and LS technical shirts. The big plus with the bike jerseys is that they're cut for riding a bike so they tend to be longer in the back. When I wear my regular shirts, they tend to ride up (I'm a tall guy). In the heat of the summer that's OK, but as the weather gets cooler I don't want my lower back out in the breeze. I don't ever use the pockets, but I guess they're nice to have just in case.
 

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Wearing a bike jersey won't give you some magical mojo, so don't worry you are not missing out on anything. With that said, some people like the way it is cut and the pockets in the back; personally, I'm happy with a normal moisture-wicking t-shirt.
 

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I use jerseys on the road bike because I dont have the camelback to haul all my junk. On the mtb it's just a tech shirt, they cost about $15 and when I shred them on a mesquite tree that is easier to stomach than a $75 jersey.

It's personal preference. I am a tall guy as well and sometimes feel like my crack is hanging out because the tech-t isn't as long in back, but it isn't me that has to look at it so I am ok with that.
 

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madsedan said:
Nice, I had no idea, thanks for the info, thats exactly what I needed to know.
I just assumed they were overpriced poly blend t-shirts.
most still are overpriced poly blend, they just have 3 pockets. look for some sportswool jerseys. also, bike jerseys tend to be longer in the rear and shorter in the front. they tend to fit more tightly for wicking. and good ones have zippers that go from the neck to belly button to adj airflow.
 

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Wēk Sôs
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you can also just use a workout shirt ($5-$10 or so for poly at discount places) and a man purse (pouch thing that goes around the waist that you hang on the backside instead of side or front). :p
 

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Pimpmobile
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I go for the plain color pricepoint classic jerseys... 2 for around $32.00! They're quite comfortable.

I hate stuff in my shorts pockets, so the jersey holds my phone, keys, and for long rides, a couple gels.
 

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I actually prefer cotton T-shirts in warm weather to synthetic jerseys/shirts. For the same reason that "cotton kills" in cooler weather, all that moisture goes a long way in evaporative cooling in the heat of summer.

I actually don't own a bike jersey, but see some utility in the partial zipper front (for ventilation). Regular wicking T's do fine for me, though.

Ryan
 

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Pimpmobile
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rmi said:
I actually prefer cotton T-shirts in warm weather to synthetic jerseys/shirts. For the same reason that "cotton kills" in cooler weather, all that moisture goes a long way in evaporative cooling in the heat of summer.

I actually don't own a bike jersey, but see some utility in the partial zipper front (for ventilation). Regular wicking T's do fine for me, though.

Ryan

You definately aren't from the southeast USA!

Cotton T-shirts will quickly become waterlogged in the South Carolina summers!
 

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HamfisT said:
You definately aren't from the southeast USA!

Cotton T-shirts will quickly become waterlogged in the South Carolina summers!
I definitely AM from the southeast (northern GA).

That's what I'm talking about: A "waterlogged" T-shirt keeps you cooler (albiet wetter) than synthetic in the summer. When there is no fear of hypothermia, who cares about being dry?

Ryan
 

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Pimpmobile
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Ugh...

I can't stand a sticky soggy t-shirt! A good synthetic fabric will allow moisture to evaporate much faster, hence greater cooling effect.

North GA huh? I'm in southern SC.. can't be too far from me!
 

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rmi said:
That's what I'm talking about: A "waterlogged" T-shirt keeps you cooler (albiet wetter) than synthetic in the summer. When there is no fear of hypothermia, who cares about being dry?
As a lifelong southerner, I completely disagree. A wet shirt in high humidity just sits there, while tech fabrics speed the process of drying that cools you down. Simply being wet doesn't do anything for you if evaporation isn't happening.
 

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gabe23 said:
As a lifelong southerner, I completely disagree. A wet shirt in high humidity just sits there, while tech fabrics speed the process of drying that cools you down. Simply being wet doesn't do anything for you if evaporation isn't happening.
This! I live in New Orleans, and 100% humidity near stops evaporation. The tech shirts really help with that. I've never owned a bike jersey so I don't know about those. But I'd imagine they'd be as or more effective than tech shirts.
 

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Master of Disaster
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rmi said:
A "waterlogged" T-shirt keeps you cooler (albiet wetter) than synthetic in the summer.
Riddle me this Batman: How does a sticking and waterlogged cotton t-shirt that blocks air flow keep you cooler than a wicking poly jersey that's still flowing air while having evaporated the same amount of sweat that would be stuck in the t-shirt?

Sure, okay, parts of the wet t-shirt away from your body feel cool for a second as you touch them and not so with a dry jersey. Also, in a short burst of speed you'll feel a momentary cooling sensation in a wet shirt. But since your cooling comes via the phase change from liquid to vapor (evaporation), a pint of sweat evaporated has to be cooler over time than the same pint of sweat still in your shirt, no?

Whatever works for you but I'm going with on the popularity of inexpensive sports jersies - and I'm in N. Georgia too.
 

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I like the technical fabric jerseys and bibs.:) In fact, I never wear anything made from cotton on any long bike ride. Riding through the mountains with road bike guys, I have learned tons of useful stuff.

I still refuse to use DeezNuts.:D
 
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