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SelfPropelledDevo said:
actually being in the drops is not the most aero position.
its much faster to have your hands on the top of the bar, centered, near the stem, with your knees and elbows right about center line along the top tube.

as if a fast descent
Thanks. I'll have to try that next time, though the idea of having less steering control from such a grip doesn't sound good to me for some of our rougher roads
 

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urban turban said:
If you don't plan to race you should consider a more comfortable bike as rox mentioned. A Specialized Roubaix or Secteur would fit the bill. Less road vibration means you can ride it much longer and a more comfortable riding position means the transition from mtb to road bike will be less dramatic.

You can get the same benefits as high zoot carbon by getting a bike that can deal with
28mm or 35mm tires and inflating the tires properly. There is a lot of fun riding in the bay area if you can fit a fat enough tire on a road bike to deal with the occasional dirt road/trail
without worrying about flats.

The cheap/easy way is to get a CX bike. The expensive way is to get a road bike with long reach brakes and do a 650B wheel conversion.



- Booker C. Bense
 

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boomn said:
Most road riders I know spend 80-90% of the time with their hands up on the "hoods" and rarely use the drop portion, so their hands are around the same height as most flat bar road bikes xc mountain bikes. They only really use the drops for getting aero for fast downhills
Most road riders don't have bikes that come anywhere near fitting them. It's getting better but the vast majority of road bikes in shops are completely inappropriate for anybody that isn't serious about actual road racing vs just riding or even just riding fast.

There has been a change in positions over the years, but you should still be able to ride in the drops for extended periods of time. If not the bike simply doesn't fit you.

- Booker C. Bense
 

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boomn said:
Thanks. I'll have to try that next time, though the idea of having less steering control from such a grip doesn't sound good to me for some of our rougher roads
Umm... that's not really the best advice. It is faster if you're riding fast enough for aero drag to dominate ( above 18mph or so ), but it is far from safe. It's especially bad if your position puts too much weight on the bars ( and if you can't ride in the drops this is likely the case. )

Unless you've spent the time to develop the core flexiblity and strength to ride in the position of the pros, it's a bad mistake to try and copy them. While they do have extreme positions, they also have relatively little weight on the hands. Little weight on the hands is what you want and as you get better and stronger, you can move towards the pro position.

A road bike can be a device of extreme torture if you don't get the position that matches your body and flexibility.

- Booker C. Bense
 

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grrrah said:
And sorry dan, but I don't think you gave it enough time to get acclimated to the position. Discomfort should be expected when you start riding a road bike,!
This IMHO is complete crap. A bike shouldn't hurt. Discomfort means the bike doesn't fit.
Now maybe if you persist you'll get the core strength and flexibility needed, but most people don't persist and I think that's a shame. Get a bike that works for who you are now...

- Booker C. Bense
 

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bbense said:
Umm... that's not really the best advice. It is faster if you're riding fast enough for aero drag to dominate ( above 18mph or so ), but it is far from safe. It's especially bad if your position puts too much weight on the bars ( and if you can't ride in the drops this is likely the case. )

Unless you've spent the time to develop the core flexiblity and strength to ride in the position of the pros, it's a bad mistake to try and copy them. While they do have extreme positions, they also have relatively little weight on the hands. Little weight on the hands is what you want and as you get better and stronger, you can move towards the pro position.

A road bike can be a device of extreme torture if you don't get the position that matches your body and flexibility.

- Booker C. Bense
I'm riding a flat bar on a roadified 29er for now so no drops anyway, but many of my rides do involve descents where 30mph isn't hard but at about that I really feel the air slowing my down in my normal riding position. I personally am not trying to copy the pros, especially with a flat bar bastard bike, and I've spend a lot of time tweaking the cockpit setup and positioning to be comfortable and sustainable for long rides. I'd replace it with a "real" road bike but it works well for what it is and I'd hate to give up the ability to run gravel and trail capable 40c semi-slicks (or bigger like Vulpines if desired)

(pic here, though I've since gone back to a narrow flat bar with bar ends that kinda replicates the hood position, and bumped it up to a 26/36/48 triple up front)
 

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bbense said:
You can get the same benefits as high zoot carbon by getting a bike that can deal with
28mm or 35mm tires and inflating the tires properly. There is a lot of fun riding in the bay area if you can fit a fat enough tire on a road bike to deal with the occasional dirt road/trail
without worrying about flats.

The cheap/easy way is to get a CX bike. The expensive way is to get a road bike with long reach brakes and do a 650B wheel conversion.


- Booker C. Bense
Actually, a 1970s steel frame will most likely also offer this ability, at possibly the greatest value. My friend Josh rode his Dad's old Ron Cooper (they're the same height) at the Old Caz Grasshopper one year with 28's and down-tube shifters. It was badass. And if that gets censored, I mean B A D A S S. A 1970s frame's rear triangle can be spread from 126mm to 130mm to fit modern drivetrains. And then you've got a hot rod.

Morgan
 

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bicycle rider
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bbense said:
You can get the same benefits as high zoot carbon by getting a bike that can deal with
28mm or 35mm tires and inflating the tires properly. There is a lot of fun riding in the bay area if you can fit a fat enough tire on a road bike to deal with the occasional dirt road/trail
without worrying about flats.

The cheap/easy way is to get a CX bike. The expensive way is to get a road bike with long reach brakes and do a 650B wheel conversion.


- Booker C. Bense
Actually, a 1970s steel road frame will most likely also offer this ability, at possibly the greatest value. My friend Josh rode his Dad's old Ron Cooper (they're the same height) at the Old Caz Grasshopper one year with 28's and down-tube shifters. It was badass. And if that gets censored, I mean B A D A S S. A 1970s frame's rear triangle can be spread from 126mm to 130mm to fit modern drivetrains. And then you've got a hot rod.

Morgan
 

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Fermented Grain Sampler
clinking clanking clattering collection of collagenous junk
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Discussion Starter · #53 ·
SelfPropelledDevo said:
Hunter 29er
.....rockin bike...
Nice. Maybe something like that in addition to a roadie someday. Correct # of bikes is N+1, right?

Wading through a few mfg sites for specs 'n geo info plus LBS pages for pricing can make one's head spin. I need to get my butt in a few saddles now. Most importantly, the other half didn't shoot my idea down. :thumbsup:
 
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seriously
I'd buy that Cdale off of Ebay... if it fits you. take some measures off of what you are currently riding.

saddle height, middle of BB spindle to top of saddle
tip of saddle to center of handle bar
tip of saddle to center of steer tube
handlebar height, ground to handle bar

and just get a general idea of what you have going on.

that Cdale is pretty cheap, it looks like a solid bike.
you could shoot the guy an email and ask him to show the chain wear with a Park CC-3
http://www.parktool.com/product/chain-wear-indicator-CC-3

some macro shots of the braking surfaces

some measures,etc...
 

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wg said:
Nice. Maybe something like that in addition to a roadie someday. Correct # of bikes is N+1, right?

Wading through a few mfg sites for specs 'n geo info plus LBS pages for pricing can make one's head spin. I need to get my butt in a few saddles now. Most importantly, the other half didn't shoot my idea down. :thumbsup:
Jamis makes some pretty interesting bikes that are both relatively cheap and well designed.

- Booker C. Bense
 

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just be that guy that goes into the lbs, test rides every model, then goes to manufacturer site and looks up geo, then buys used!

I hear mikes bikes loves that! perf bike too!
 

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Fermented Grain Sampler
clinking clanking clattering collection of collagenous junk
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Discussion Starter · #58 ·
redmr2_man said:
just be that guy that goes into the lbs, test rides every model, then goes to manufacturer site and looks up geo, then buys used!

I hear mikes bikes loves that! perf bike too!
:rolleyes:
Just a touch of scarcasm? BTW, I hit the sites first then test ride. So there.
 

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Fart smeller
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wg said:
Yah, I could have posted on Roadbike review but I don't rember my ID/password and didn't feel like dealing with it. I did scrounge around through the forums a bit.
I wonder how many members MTBR is missing out on because of things like this. I've got a friend who, for the life of him, can't get back onto MTBR. He's tried everything & just gave up in frustration. :skep:
 
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