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wg said:
I've been to the PH Mike's (got my daughter's bike there). I also was a customer of the 4th St store many times. That's who I actually consider the original since I came from that side of the bay.
Traction Bikes does carry Orbea though... I really like the Orca but then reality kicks in... I'll start with a good solid frame, figure this roadie thing (parts etc) out then look at the blingy stuff. Kind of how I moved into the current MTB collection. Either way, I'm going to need to add space onto the garage bike storage system.
Road bikes don't take the beating mountain bikes do. You might be OK with a used road bike, something to consider. And classic steel framed road bikes have really nice rides. (Consider 100 years of evolution for a mid-2000's steel road bike.) Might be a good way to start, instead of going with bling right away. One of the best-riding road bikes I ever had was an early-2000's Landshark with mid-range Campagnolo 9spd drivetrain. Wish I still had it. The bike that made me love road riding was a mid-1980s Eddy Merckx with 6spd Dura-ace. The current crop of $6000 road bikes are way overkill for most riders. It's a lot like mtn bikes; good frame, wheels and tires are paramount. Shifting and braking are overrated. Component weight is not that big of a deal.

There are a lot of fine, local frame builders who could build you a nice metal frame that fits right for what a Taiwanese carbon will cost you, consider an Inglis, Sycip, Hunter, Rocklobster, Kish, Steelman, Eisentraut, Litton, Taylor or Rex.

There are some fantastic road rides in the SF Bay Area; Marshall Wall loop in Marin, Morgan Territory Loop in the east bay, Kings Ridge loop up in Sonoma, tons of stuff in the Peninsula, the old Steinbeck Century loop in Salinas, etc. Rolling down highway 1 from Carmel to Nepenthe for lunch, then back is an amazing ride. Any of the ways over Mt. Tamalpais are great fun. Nothing is better training than a solid hour climbing Mt. Diablo. Good stuff.

Morgan
 

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Just throwing this out there. I love my '83 Raleigh with a 531 Reynolds frame. Mind you, I have some modern components on it, but if you're looking into getting into roadie stuff, why not buy used, inexpensive, and see if you like it? If you love it, upgrade, if you don't, well, you didn't lose much money.
 

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d-bug said:
This is the route I went:
1. get road bike
2. feel unsafe on road bike due to how the handlebars/brakes interface. Wish someone made a roadie with a flat bar.
3. sell road bike.
4. discover and get this. http://www.jamisbikes.com/usa/thebikes/street/coda/11_codaelite.html (older model though)
5. put lighter and better parts on it.
6. love riding this thing to/from work

I also built something similar with a mtb frame with a rigid for and some disc hubs strung to road rims before I found the Jamis.
Once in a while, usually when it rains for too long, I look at road bikes. The feeling usually passes fairly quickly though. The Spesh Sirrus in full carbon looks pretty cool for a flat bar bike. I tried the drop bar, and my back/neck really can't take it.
 

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Crazed Country Rebel
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wg said:
:rolleyes:
Haven't decided if I have the $$ but I'm starting to shop....I just came back from a nice chat with Tony at the new Walnut Creek Mike's Bikes. I'll be heading back to try a few 61/62 cm models out later this week with pedals and shoes.
Other shop /bike recommendations around here that'll take pity on a noob roadie?
I looked at the Tarmac Elite Apex the most but will explore others. I don't plan on racing. Just more recreational, fun rides such as eventually head up Diablo.
Yah, I could have posted on Roadbike review but I don't rember my ID/password and didn't feel like dealing with it. I did scrounge around through the forums a bit.

Thanks
Dude. Get a Rivendell. Grant likes his handlebars much higher up than most manufacturers, which you would like.

He only does steel - which is comfortable and long lasting.

He focuses on ride quality and durability.

He is based out of Walnut Creek.

Assuming you've got budget, of course!:cool:
 

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morganfletcher said:
There are a lot of fine, local frame builders who could build you a nice metal frame that fits right for what a Taiwanese carbon will cost you, consider an Inglis, Sycip, Hunter, Rocklobster, Kish, Steelman, Eisentraut, Litton, Taylor or Rex.....
What! No love for Sean at Soulcraft Morgan? ;) I would include him in the list of World class Bay Area/Norcal frame builders
 

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I would definitely get a 'comfort' road bike. Slightly higher handlebars, etc. Also, do you ride KOPS on your mtn bike? That will make the transition easier. Find where your knee is in relation to the pedal spindle and start out at most with your knee halfway on the road bike, in other words, if you are currently at 1 cm back, have them set your road bike at 1/2 cm back on the road bike, not 'over'. This matters more the more you ride, if you are much less than 1k m/year, doesn't matter. Otherwise it may be 'too' different.

Take the Roubaix -style bike thing seriously. Pinarello also has less shock in their system due to curved/twisted frame members, but not via stabilizing bars like the Roubaix and lastly Cervelo has some really nice comfort bikes mostly having to do with geometry, not bump/vibration reduction - higher headset location without spacers. You can rent a Cervelo I think from Summit in Burlingame. Its hard to rent these things in general. There are still some Pinarello FP3s on sale from 2009 or 2010 at great price reductions. That is an amazing bike at the sale price! Like people said, Giant is a good low-price brand for this, but what you get is very different than a Cervelo or Pinarello.

Don't buy into the wheel craziness. Roadies are wheel-crazy. I mean, really wheel-crazy.
 

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d-bug said:
This is the route I went:
1. get road bike
2. feel unsafe on road bike due to how the handlebars/brakes interface. Wish someone made a roadie with a flat bar.
3. sell road bike.
4. discover and get this. http://www.jamisbikes.com/usa/thebikes/street/coda/11_codaelite.html (older model though)
5. put lighter and better parts on it.
6. love riding this thing to/from work
Hmm. I opted to avoid the "lighter" route. Got myself a Co-Motion touring bike. It has the roadie bar but some sweet disc brakes and mountain bike gearing. Oh, and Tandem tubing, so the thing ways almost as much as my singlespeed mtn. bike.

When I decide I must ride on road I do really love it. 35mm tires are pretty much needed for the craptacular Santa Cruz backroads. On some rides I do wish it had suspension, but steel does a good job of keeping things smooth.

-j
 

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Wait.

Stop.

Consider a cross bike.

You can slap slicks on it for your Livestrong thing and do just fine then slap some knobbies on and have a good ole time off-road for decades to come
 

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Fermented Grain Sampler
clinking clanking clattering collection of collagenous junk
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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
Benevolent Clown said:
Wait.

Stop.

Consider a cross bike.

You can slap slicks on it for your Livestrong thing and do just fine then slap some knobbies on and have a good ole time off-road for decades to come
That thought has crossed my mind...
As have Rivendell (hell, they're based about 300 yards from my office but again with budget.... that ain't happening)
 

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MSH said:
What! No love for Sean at Soulcraft Morgan? ;) I would include him in the list of World class Bay Area/Norcal frame builders
I forgot Soulcraft! Sorry. Yeah, his bikes are fine, and he's a damn good writer, too. Been reading his essays in Bike Monkey magazine. They're really good.

Morgan
 

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I just dumped my disused road bike and swapped all the parts to a Sette CX-1 frame. The frame is lightweight and buff so I am confident riding it on or off the road. Currently using Kenda SB8 cross tires and it rolls quick on the pavement too. The complete bike with Ultegra components is currently on sale on pricepoint.
 
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there are a ton of bikes out there
take your time.

personally, if it were me, I'd grab a decent bike, at the most I'd spend maybe $1500
just make sure it fits, that's the biggest deal.
try not to buy something that is fairly new... that is... i'd avoid spending $1500 on a 10 year old bike.

a lot of bikes on eBay... lots of people just ditching their stuff.
road bikes tend to go thru parts... especially 10spd stuff... a chain gauge is a handy tool

here's an example

$650

http://cgi.ebay.com/2006-Cannondale...=Road_Bikes&hash=item2a0f74cb86#ht_659wt_1141

try something like this... see if you even like riding a road bike...
don't get too crazy on changing parts, other than focusing on your fit, shoes, etc...
ride it, wear out a couple of sets of tyres... a drive train...
then think of something that really catches your attention
buy new bike... either keep old road bike, for crappy days, or resell...
 

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LightMiner said:
I would definitely get a 'comfort' road bike. Slightly higher handlebars, etc.
What he said. One with a sloping top tube instead of horizontal. A comfortable riding position is crucial on a road bike.
 

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zorg said:
I tried the drop bar, and my back/neck really can't take it.
Most road riders I know spend 80-90% of the time with their hands up on the "hoods" and rarely use the drop portion, so their hands are around the same height as most flat bar road bikes xc mountain bikes. They only really use the drops for getting aero for fast downhills
 
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boomn said:
Most road riders I know spend 80-90% of the time with their hands up on the "hoods" and rarely use the drop portion, so their hands are around the same height as most flat bar road bikes xc mountain bikes. They only really use the drops for getting aero for fast downhills
sprints and close quarters... you want to "close the hook" to avoid hooking handlebars, etc...
its the primary "posture" when group dynamics start to heat up. i.e. lead out
 

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SelfPropelledDevo said:
sprints and close quarters... you want to "close the hook" to avoid hooking handlebars, etc...
its the primary "posture" when group dynamics start to heat up. i.e. lead out
See, I still have much to learn. I've recently started road riding a bit but not in group settings yet
 
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boomn said:
. They only really use the drops for getting aero for fast downhills
actually being in the drops is not the most aero position.
its much faster to have your hands on the top of the bar, centered, near the stem, with your knees and elbows right about center line along the top tube.

as if a fast descent
 
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