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The guide that came with the fork doesn't say how much oil is to be used to fill up the fork and/or both sides etc. Any clue?
also internal damper rod is connected with top cap. How do you guys change the springs ? thanks. :confused:
 

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Stephen7 said:
The guide that came with the fork doesn't say how much oil is to be used to fill up the fork and/or both sides etc. Any clue?
also internal damper rod is connected with top cap. How do you guys change the springs ? thanks. :confused:
Between 190 and 185mm from the top with the springs out,fork and cartridges compressed.

The change the springs..
1) unthread the top cap.
2) Using two wrenches, one on the cap and one on the red lock nut, carefully remove the cap assembly from the cartridge.
3) This is where things can get tricky.... Remove the red lock from the cartridge. Sometimes this may lock itself against the end of the threads on the cartridge. If it does, you will need a set of vise blocks to hold the shaft to remove this.
4) Compress spring slightly to remove the preload clip. Don't lose this clip.
5) Remove preload cap and spring.
6) reverse the order for pitting it all together.

When replacing everything, 1) Just start the adjustment rod into the cartridge. You do not want to thread it in all the way. 2) Be careful when starting to thread the cap assembly on to the cartridge. Some people cross thread this and then try to force it. You will end up breaking expensive pieces of your fork.

If you don't feel confident in doing this, take it to a shop!!

Brian
 

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Brian Peterson said:
Between 190 and 185mm from the top with the springs out,fork and cartridges compressed.

The change the springs..
1) unthread the top cap.
2) Using two wrenches, one on the cap and one on the red lock nut, carefully remove the cap assembly from the cartridge.
3) This is where things can get tricky.... Remove the red lock from the cartridge. Sometimes this may lock itself against the end of the threads on the cartridge. If it does, you will need a set of vise blocks to hold the shaft to remove this.
4) Compress spring slightly to remove the preload clip. Don't lose this clip.
5) Remove preload cap and spring.
6) reverse the order for pitting it all together.

When replacing everything, 1) Just start the adjustment rod into the cartridge. You do not want to thread it in all the way. 2) Be careful when starting to thread the cap assembly on to the cartridge. Some people cross thread this and then try to force it. You will end up breaking expensive pieces of your fork.

If you don't feel confident in doing this, take it to a shop!!

Brian
Brian,

I attempted to do this since I purchased heavier springs. Using a 10mm wrench I undid the red jam nut and screwed it down the shaft. Then carefully tried to unscrew the top cap from the shaft. After several turns the shaft was still turning and the top cap wasn't going anywhere. When I tried to remove the 10mm wrench I realized the red jam nut was expanding instead. Fearing it would split I reversed directions until the jam nut was back in place against the top cap and back to normal size. I tried again by first breaking loose the jam nut then holding the shaft in rubber jawed pliers I tried to remove the top cap. The sucker is jammed on there pretty good and I didn't want to clamp down so hard on the shaft fearing I would crush the hollow tube. I put everything back together and am very frustrated. I would figure you could run the top cap on a bit more than finger tight and lock it with the jam nut. Instead I find the top cap is torqued down so hard on the shaft from the factory the jam nut isn't necessary.

I live in an area where the LBS's don't have a clue on how to work on forks like these and I've been doing very well maintaining my own Marzocchi's since my first 98 Z1 BAM. I really miss the maintenance instructions in the manual. Racing downhill bikes is kind of like skydiving where you are packing your own parachute and I'm uneasy letting anyone else work on my stuff.

Any suggestions?

Mike
 

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Dartman said:
Brian,

I attempted to do this since I purchased heavier springs. Using a 10mm wrench I undid the red jam nut and screwed it down the shaft. Then carefully tried to unscrew the top cap from the shaft. After several turns the shaft was still turning and the top cap wasn't going anywhere. When I tried to remove the 10mm wrench I realized the red jam nut was expanding instead. Fearing it would split I reversed directions until the jam nut was back in place against the top cap and back to normal size. I tried again by first breaking loose the jam nut then holding the shaft in rubber jawed pliers I tried to remove the top cap. The sucker is jammed on there pretty good and I didn't want to clamp down so hard on the shaft fearing I would crush the hollow tube. I put everything back together and am very frustrated. I would figure you could run the top cap on a bit more than finger tight and lock it with the jam nut. Instead I find the top cap is torqued down so hard on the shaft from the factory the jam nut isn't necessary.

I live in an area where the LBS's don't have a clue on how to work on forks like these and I've been doing very well maintaining my own Marzocchi's since my first 98 Z1 BAM. I really miss the maintenance instructions in the manual. Racing downhill bikes is kind of like skydiving where you are packing your own parachute and I'm uneasy letting anyone else work on my stuff.

Any suggestions?

Mike
Hey Mike, I've swapped springs on a few of these forks.........

I got my own, and I have the tools (soft jawed vice blocks) from marzocchi, and still had the same exact problem you did, my fork is at marzocchi right now letting them do it, I was putting way too much effort/force on the cart. rod and was in fear of breaking it. (if the consumer breaks it, he/she pays for it, if marzocchi breaks it while in there hands they pay for it)

You sound like you took yours even further, I would just suggest sending it back in, this is not a user friendly serviceable fork like other marzocchi's in the passed, I deffinatly think they dropped the ball there........... if they argue otherwise, I'd highly disagree, as I've seen a few broken cart's already and tons of pissed off consumers, not able to dial/tune there fork. (which is something owners of a fork of this nature are known to do)

I would think they would make a tool, other than just these lil vice blocks that would enable you to remove the jamnut/top cap much easier/safer..... it seems as if they are just asking to piss a bunch of people off......... already talked to a few who went to different fork companies after selling there 888's because of this.........

my .02 cents is I'd send it in, let Ronnie work on it, IMO he's the only person in Zocchi Tech that actually knows what's goin on....... let him do some "works" stuff on it while it's there my as well make it worth it's trip and your time off the bike/fork........ hope this helps.....

now with a fork like the Fox DH fork comin out, I'd think Zocchi would need to step it up......

p.s.-I was told a hair differently on the fork oil heigth....... than what Brian P. has mentioned, I was told the stock heigth is 180 and the raised safe heigth is 170.......
 

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Castle said:
Hey Mike, I've swapped springs on a few of these forks.........

I got my own, and I have the tools (soft jawed vice blocks) from marzocchi, and still had the same exact problem you did, my fork is at marzocchi right now letting them do it, I was putting way too much effort/force on the cart. rod and was in fear of breaking it. (if the consumer breaks it, he/she pays for it, if marzocchi breaks it while in there hands they pay for it)

You sound like you took yours even further, I would just suggest sending it back in, this is not a user friendly serviceable fork like other marzocchi's in the passed, I deffinatly think they dropped the ball there........... if they argue otherwise, I'd highly disagree, as I've seen a few broken cart's already and tons of pissed off consumers, not able to dial/tune there fork. (which is something owners of a fork of this nature are known to do)

I would think they would make a tool, other than just these lil vice blocks that would enable you to remove the jamnut/top cap much easier/safer..... it seems as if they are just asking to piss a bunch of people off......... already talked to a few who went to different fork companies after selling there 888's because of this.........

my .02 cents is I'd send it in, let Ronnie work on it, IMO he's the only person in Zocchi Tech that actually knows what's goin on....... let him do some "works" stuff on it while it's there my as well make it worth it's trip and your time off the bike/fork........ hope this helps.....

now with a fork like the Fox DH fork comin out, I'd think Zocchi would need to step it up......

p.s.-I was told a hair differently on the fork oil heigth....... than what Brian P. has mentioned, I was told the stock heigth is 180 and the raised safe heigth is 170.......
Thanks but I need it to race on next week at Snowshoe. I'm beginning to regret buying this fork and selling my Shiver. I'm going to give them a call Monday and see what they can do. I was thinking of making my own vise block out of aluminum block at work tomorrow and see how that works. I don't think I hurt the fork yet as the locknut returned to normal size after I backed it off the shaft. If I can't get the springs out I'll just have to run it as is.

Yes, Marzocchi needs to step it up. They took away the service instructions from the end user and say to take it to a authorized dealer for service and none of the LBS's in my area have had any training or service instructions provided to them except what they can get over the phone.

I've got a bunch of their forks. A '98 Z1 BAM, a Monster T, Shiver( sold), Super T and a Marathon S, I even got a pic of me wearing a Marzocchi race jersey in the Snowshoe Mountain Bike park flyer and trail map. I'm their No. 1 fan but I'm getting ready to jump ship if things keep going like they are.

Mike :mad:

 

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I don't have the experience on this fork to get every little issue dialed yet... I have only changed the spring and adjusted the oil height in mine.... I would suggest calling the tech guys @ (800)227-5579..

As for the oil height, I tried 170mm on an early recommendation from one of the guys, but I found it to get harsh in the mid stroke... The 180mm setting has been much better IMO.

Brian
 

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Dartman said:
Thanks but I need it to race on next week at Snowshoe. I'm beginning to regret buying this fork and selling my Shiver. I'm going to give them a call Monday and see what they can do. I was thinking of making my own vise block out of aluminum block at work tomorrow and see how that works. I don't think I hurt the fork yet as the locknut returned to normal size after I backed it off the shaft. If I can't get the springs out I'll just have to run it as is.

Yes, Marzocchi needs to step it up. They took away the service instructions from the end user and say to take it to a authorized dealer for service and none of the LBS's in my area have had any training or service instructions provided to them except what they can get over the phone.

I've got a bunch of their forks. A '98 Z1 BAM, a Monster T, Shiver( sold), Super T and a Marathon S, I even got a pic of me wearing a Marzocchi race jersey in the Snowshoe Mountain Bike park flyer and trail map. I'm their No. 1 fan but I'm getting ready to jump ship if things keep going like they are.

Mike :mad:

I just finished changing the oil in mine. After unjaming the jam nut the top caps were still tight and I was not able to hold the damper rod tight enough with just pliers and a piece of rubber. I ended up making some blocks out pine. I just drilled a 1/4 inch hole though center, split it then threw it in the vice around the damper rod and let the wood deform to shape. That held the rod tight enough to break the top cap loose. It was not as much trouble as people have been making it out to be Im sure with a little more effort you'll have that thing apart just fine.
 

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2 out of the 3 I've worrked on went real easy, my personal one wasn't the case, the top caps were torqued very tightly on the carts..... I just sent it in to let them do it, the amount of force I was using was making me feel very unsafe about workin on the fork.....


btw the wood blocks seem pretty interesting, the aluminum ones would just slide unless they were clamped so hard leaving small marks on the cart rods..........

seems as if a clamp/vise style with a rubber grip would be a really handy tool............. something you could really lock down on it without fear of ruing the rods.....
 

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marzocchi guys are awesome helping any customer, and even if your failing attempt of "how hard it could be is only a fork" kind of mess something their waranty dept is very understanding, especially if you dont start the conversation with a piss/demanding tone. dh'ers/fr'rdrs made some of the best technical riders in the world but also are the worst mechanics usually using wrong oil wt. wrong spring and some of the most screwed up forks/shocks set ups. sometimes using bikes too small or too large for them, wrong frame size will definitelly make a great fork/shock feel like crap. unless you weight 200lbs or 20-40 foot drops is your kind of riding, using too heavy springs for dh will take about 2 in. of travel from any fork. ??????? buy a 8" fork and only used 6"? hummm. changin oil wt. actually adjusting the rebound and the compression will correctly according to the course you plan to ride will be much easier and actually made the fork perform like you expect or better. better call zocchi, or talk to some of the mechanics on the races. most riders even well intention confuse the ability to do a tailwhip, jump and go down a mountain fast with the ability and knowledge of a true bike mechanic. I will never dare to my riding skills with the ones of some riders in here, but I sure get a hell of a lot of fun reading some of the advices, set-ups. but again its all well intented and once in a while they teach me something new............ha if you think the 888 is not user friendly and cant wait for the fox, you are up for the surprise of your life, anyone that worked on a fox fork will tell you, they're great forks but also not easy to work with, after dh/fr abuse lets the fun start.
 

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the only person in tech that really knows his stuff is Ronnie.......

Fox singlecrown forks are not hard to work on....... just make sure you have new crush fittings

I weigh 200lbs...... unless you weigh under 170lbs there is no way the 888 stock springs would suit anyone they are way too soft...... since the compression adjustment on the 888 is only for high speed/large hits, the preload helped a lil........ I personally still found myself about 7" into my travel during hard cornering, it didn't make for a good handling bike and any drops over 6 feet to less than ideal landings bottomed the fork harshly........ this was on the 8" one I originally owned..... (which I'll mention was no problem to work on)

the bike see's 10+ drops on a regular basis?

I like to ride my bikes a hair small for me, they are much more fun that way and so much easier to flick around? what gives?

Warranty does not cover a broken cartridge in your hand..... these carts are expensive..... They do cover it however if they break it while in their posession.....

what other form of a rider is a better mechanic? that's a pretty crap statement....

I think you still got some learnin to do before you go spouting off....
 

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a good rider not necesary make a good mech, nor a good mech necesary make for a good rider, but you can find a little of everything in between both extremes, riding a bike a hair small do make it easy to throw around, also will make for the need for more firm suspension set up. due to the rider weight distribution, so yes in your case you will go to the travel relatively easy,doesnt mean that your personal setup preference is better nor worst than someone else, is just what you preferred... bottom out your suspension once in a while is not bad, how else you will know if you're using the whole travel, I have bottom both front and rear susp on my bike few times, large gemini stock 888r, change the 7.5wt oil for 10wt. preload about halfway, 3 to15ft drops dirtjumps, (here in tx there not that many mtn, but we have some nasty holes) street, even the MS 150, (anyone can do it on a road bike) I'm 6ft/205lbs and use my bike from dh/fr to xc, also raced 12hr race solo category and won both yrs on a row( feel awesome to smoke a xc crowd on a dh/fr bike that weights twice as much as their bikes) and you are very right I do have a lot to learn. anyone that think he knows all the answers actually knows nothing, because is not open to learn, sorry you took my posting kind of personal, the same way that you think your advise was good,,,,, so everyone else advise is also good. there no right or wrong, just diferent preference.
 

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the size of a frame will not change shock ratio's or feeling of a fork..

there are rights and wrongs in suspension set up, most will have to do with the style of riding you choose.....

most of what I said isn't opinion...... if you do the homework you'll find out, I'm not jus spouting off.....

there is no "about" halfway on a 888 for preload...... there is a moveable c-clip inside the fork it has 3 positions, there is no "about" to it, it's either in the top most,middle, or lowest setting, it is not adjusted by a extrernal adjuster knob.....

on a side note I bet you got some crazy looks at the ms150 on a big bike good stuff..... rock on!!!!!
 

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as I said your advise was fine as for mine, the terminology used by my maybe diferent than yours but meant the same, agreed that the size wont affect the ratios nor the performance of the fork, or the shock, but the rider weight distribution in proportion between the fork and shock while manuvering the bike will definitely affect the performance of the bike, shorter frame usually performed better with stiffer springs or higher air pressure on the fork/shock than a longer frame, the terrain and the rider riding stile are some of the most important factors. again I in no way saying that you are wrong, and the chances are that if I ride with you I probably set your bike the same way as you, the same way if you ride my bike you probably wonder how come it didnt buttom out in the same terrain as yours will and viceversa. there too many factors to take in consideration. will be fun to sit around the shop and pick your brain for ideas and experience....
oh, it is awesome to ride my bike with full body armor on a xc ride and after 10 miles heard the xc riders asking me how come I ride that heavy ass bike....
but the fun part is that their 24lb xc hardtails, and fuel 100's, havent drop me yet,and I rode 2 or 3rd in the pack.and after getting back to the parking lot go and hit the jumps/drops while they check their heart rate monitors while wearing spandex outfit 2 sizes too small with the logos of some euro road team....plus dh/fr'ders definitely can party and have fun everywhere we go. if you guys ever in tx, stop by the only dh-fr-street-dirt bike shop in the state
 

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Homemade Softjaw

I had the same problem when swaping springs w/ my 888, and ended up making my own softjaw. I first tried wood (same instructions as above), but it didn't work for me... the cartridge still slipped. I then took two small pieces of copper 1 inch diamater pipe... each about two inches long (leftover from the new water heater). Then crushed them semi-flat in the vise, using a drill bit to privide a round conture. Also added a peice of duct-tape to make hing so they were easier to handle. Then just clamped the cartridge w/ the copper pipe sections in the vise and the topcap and red lock nut came right off... Hope this helps.
 
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