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Recovering couch patato
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
All those dinglespeeds got me thinking.

29t outer chainring
36t middle ring

11-26 bottom part of a SRAM 11-34 cassette, spacers to replace the 30 and 34.

No front derailer, just an inner chain guide.

29t to be used for 1x7 geared riding
29x26 gear : 29+26=55

Since most 29" bikes have SS ready frames, adjust chainstay length to ideal tension for 36x20. 36+20=56, so the chain is long enough for the 29x26 gear.
Spacers are used to perfect chainline on 36x20.

It would be even easier to line up the gears for a SS commuting gear. Outer ring could be the larger of the two.

All it would take for the switch from geared to SS and vice versa would be to unhook the Powerlink, stick through or pull out of derailer, and rejoin.

Odd, maybe stupid, and I may not even try it, but would anyone like such a thing, or see big issues? Some fidling with the number might make ratio's more sensible technically, and for your own riding?

Happy fiddling,

J
 

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Cloxxki said:
All those dinglespeeds got me thinking.
J
So, the rear mech would be just dangling there when in SS mode? And the difference in chain length going from the larger SS ring to the smaller Geared ring would give enough slack when on the smaller ring to shift through the cassette? Am I understanding this correctly?

If so, seems like the smaller geared ring should be to the inside, with an inner chain guide such as the Third Eye, and the larger SS ring on the outside to keep the chain on the geared ring.

You could always reverse the position of the cogs to put a larger cog to the outside to line up with the out mounted SS ring. how's that for funky?

Also, the cog used for SS use may still throw the chain since it's ramped and whatnot. I've never been able to get a regular geared cog to cooperate in a SS setup without using a singleator or derailleur or such to keep it from jumping.

Another thing, even if the chain is barely long enough for the small ring and largest cog, there still needs to be a little more to allow it shift, right? Otherwise it seems it would just get bound up.

I'd probably be willing to try it, but honestly i don't even own a rear derailleur:madman:
 

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A suggestion

If you add a front der & shifter you will be able to achieve the same thing without removing & replacing the chain. Just use a shifter from the comfort of your handlebars.

Much simpler if you ask me.

Jonathan :)
 

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Recovering couch patato
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
long hazy daze said:
So, the rear mech would be just dangling there when in SS mode? And the difference in chain length going from the larger SS ring to the smaller Geared ring would give enough slack when on the smaller ring to shift through the cassette? Am I understanding this correctly?

You could always reverse the position of the cogs to put a larger cog to the outside to line up with the out mounted SS ring. how's that for funky?

Also, the cog used for SS use may still throw the chain since it's ramped and whatnot. I've never been able to get a regular geared cog to cooperate in a SS setup without using a singleator or derailleur or such to keep it from jumping.

Another thing, even if the chain is barely long enough for the small ring and largest cog, there still needs to be a little more to allow it shift, right? Otherwise it seems it would just get bound up.

I'd probably be willing to try it, but honestly i don't even own a rear derailleur:madman:
Yes you understood correctly.

I like the way you think. it crossed my mind to put a large cog on the outside, only shortly. Seems the derailer would hit the cog.

Something else I saw yesterday : 2 powerlinks on the chain. the chain could jut be shortened to idea SS length with an extra 5 second effort ovre the above.

I've built frankencassettes with a DX SS cog in it before, and it works. Shifting feels like the housings is clogged up, but then, it probably is, and it's not just to and from the DX cog. My Fisher has such a frankencassette, with mostly 8spd spacing, 8spd Alivio/Sora rapidfires, and a mi of various Shimano geared cogs and an 18t DX in there. When on that 18t, the bike already rides noticably smoother than with the neighbouring 20t and 17t.

Surly and On-One SS cogs are 9spd compatible. If you get the most important cogs from on of those, at least shifting should be decent. A SRAM shifter/derailer setup with 1:1 ESP cable pull should help, although I never owned a full SRAM kit.
Not sure how the SS and OO cogs are spaced, but if they're centered, they should be relatively easy to work together with geared cogs. With the multi-powerlink setup, a single front ring would suffice, and depending on the size of the 2nd piece of chain, the chainstays would have pre-set length for either the 16t or 20t cog (very similar chainstay length, a full chainlink apart)

11t end cog (for whom has a use for it)
13t regular cog (tail wind gear)
16t Surly/OO (commuting and get-to-trailheid) gear)
20t Surly/OO (your SS gear)
25t geared cog (for nasty hills)
32t geared

9spd lovers could insert an 18t Surly/OO and some more geared cogs for smaller shifting gaps, but I think chainline works out best if you keep the cogs count low, on a geared hub where you can spacer the pack of 6 to line up with the chainrings.

A QR derailer would be nice. Slap-On. Cable end at the shifter, not the derailer, so the derailer can be unhooked like a V-lever.

Dinglespeed lover could also just leave off the derailer and second chainring and stick to the powerlink trick to swap their gear at the trailehead. Even get a pack of Surly/OO cogs closely spaced to fine-tune SS gear for the ride :)
15-16-18-20-22?
Heck, a second identical chainring (34-34?) would help keep chainline straight regardless of the cog you pick. Sticking them on the body in reverse order would be a good chance to make it look funky.
With so many cogs though, you're going to need half-links for sure and probably rear wheel adjustment with each gear chance. Bye-bye simplicity, at least when not riding.
How to overthink a singlespeed?

/ramble
 

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why not?

I prefer my method.

I have 2 custom built bikes with s&s couplers so they pack up really small.

I simply ride the one geared for the road to the trail, then when I am ready to hit the trails, I switch bikes. This method does not require me to deal with to pesky and dirty chain links:D
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Hehe, the multi-bike method is my other trick, got my 5th 29" hardtail on the way right now, a Redline Monocog. I COULD set them all up SS, with gearing from 16t to 20t with 1t increments :)
 

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Yeah, I have a couple quick link in my chain, and a few different lengths laying around, so i can easily make the chain longer or shorter by a link or two. It's really a great idea and I havn't had any chain failure as a result. I Use a Wipperman 8spd chain, it's made to flex a bit so it'll still run smooth if the chainline is off by a few cogs.

And who needs a 32t cog? May as well walk at that point, it'd be faster.
 

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No,I hear ya. I'm not a fan of walking/running either, I rather dislike it. I get so cheesed when I lose my MO for some reason and have to hike-a-bike the rest of a climb.

I remember I used to love to drop down to my 32t cog for a climb, and I'll admit, every once in a while, I miss having that option. Beats walking for sure.....
 
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