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ak greeff said:
http://www.competitivecyclist.com/r...a-slr-teknologika-flow-saddle-4195.233.0.html this saddle shure would look good. dont think i have the pennies for that one though. i will probable get the slr flow. my flite is about 10 years old now and ready for retirement.
Not that one - but I do have a Troy Lee Designs version of the SLR. I had run Flite saddles for 14 years and found I couldn't use the newest one with a Speedball seatpost due to the non-round rails, so I tried this SLR out. Awesome.

By the way, I did some calculations to compare with the other post asking about dollar cost for weight savings. Comparing that saddle weight over my SLR with the list prices reaps a cost of $2,043 per pound of weight savings.
 

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bike rider
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That SLR looks like it is purely for road bikes. Same with the San Marco carbon. If you wanted to scoot to the front for a steep mtb climb you'd feel the end of the pad and the carbon nose. Get a Specialized Phenom. 200g and comfortable for flat pedaling. It has downward sloping, wide nose designed for steep climbing. The tail is flat and available in a 130mm width so I can slip off the back on decents.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
good input, and nice saddles. its hard to decide on where to drop the coin. ideally i would demo the saddles. a saddle that seams comfortable in the first few minutes may become unbearable after time. trial and error i guess. here's the bike
 

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Founder: Dirty3hirties
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Lelandjt said:
That SLR looks like it is purely for road bikes. Same with the San Marco carbon. If you wanted to scoot to the front for a steep mtb climb you'd feel the end of the pad and the carbon nose. Get a Specialized Phenom. 200g and comfortable for flat pedaling. It has downward sloping, wide nose designed for steep climbing. The tail is flat and available in a 130mm width so I can slip off the back on decents.
OUCH! All these saddles make me cringe!!!!!:cryin: My buddy has that saddle and it HURTS. I can understand gram counting but I'd definitely look elsewhere. I can't imagine riding all day in those super lightweight saddles......2 min on my buddies bike was such a bad experience that it actually influenced how much, actually how little would be a better phrase, I liked his bike.
 

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ddraewwg said:
OUCH! All these saddles make me cringe!!!!!:cryin: My buddy has that saddle and it HURTS. I can understand gram counting but I'd definitely look elsewhere. I can't imagine riding all day in those super lightweight saddles......2 min on my buddies bike was such a bad experience that it actually influenced how much, actually how little would be a better phrase, I liked his bike.
Saddle fit is a highly individual thing. I recommend the SLR to the OP because he's been riding the Flite for nearly as long as I have. My SLR has decent padding and fits like a glove, and if he's ridden Flites I think he'd like it. I don't like the looks of the one he's thinking of, and definitely not the all-carbon San Marco thing with zero padding.

I first tried the Rocket V on my Mojo based on Ibis and lots of other makes spec'ing them and very positive reviews on here. It's got more padding than anything I'd ever ridden, but two rides for just a couple hours each on that and I was so sore and raw I couldn't ride for days. Yet I can go on 6-hour rides with the SLR with no problems.
 

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Lelandjt said:
That SLR looks like it is purely for road bikes. Same with the San Marco carbon. If you wanted to scoot to the front for a steep mtb climb you'd feel the end of the pad and the carbon nose. Get a Specialized Phenom. 200g and comfortable for flat pedaling. It has downward sloping, wide nose designed for steep climbing. The tail is flat and available in a 130mm width so I can slip off the back on decents.
I have the 143 and have always had problems dropping behind the seat because it is too wide and gets stuck between my legs. I think the 130 would be right for me as well!
 

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mikuteit said:
Saddle fit is a highly individual thing. I recommend the SLR to the OP because he's been riding the Flite for nearly as long as I have. My SLR has decent padding and fits like a glove, and if he's ridden Flites I think he'd like it. I don't like the looks of the one he's thinking of, and definitely not the all-carbon San Marco thing with zero padding.

I first tried the Rocket V on my Mojo based on Ibis and lots of other makes spec'ing them and very positive reviews on here. It's got more padding than anything I'd ever ridden, but two rides for just a couple hours each on that and I was so sore and raw I couldn't ride for days. Yet I can go on 6-hour rides with the SLR with no problems.
Saddle fit sure is an individual thing. I've been riding the original Flite since it came out in what, 93? I have them on all of my bikes, and I've yet to find a suitable replacement.

I also tried the SLR XP, Flite kit Caribonio (sp?) and the Thoork, and found them to feel very similar to one another, but not to the original Flite. The Flite is well padded for its weight, and its slight hammock shape seems to provide a good rear base to push against, when powering in the saddle. The saddles I mention above felt underpadded and too flat, front to back, for my 200lb frame,

I'd like to try the Fizik Aliante, as it looks similar in shape to the Flite.

The moral is to try before you buy, if possible. Have any friends with the seat you are looking into?
 

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The "hammock" shape is good for pedal power but bad for moving around on the saddle. If you like tech and decents consider flatter saddles. I see no downside to the downward sloping wide nose and it really makes barely possible climbs nicer.
 

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Of all the components that go to make up a bike, the saddle is the most important, imo. If you find a good one that fits you like a glove, then immediately go out and buy another. ..or two more.
Sometimes, it's hard to find another saddle to replace your good one when it wears out, because saddle models change almost every year, and your dream saddle can go out of production.
If your saddle doesn't fit your sit bones and body shape well, it can be hell to ride any distance in comfort. You can search for months or even years to find "The One" that feels perfect for your body. When [ if ] you find it, buy another and store it away.
Try as many saddles as possible. Beg, borrow or steal rides on different saddles until you find that jewel and then you are set.
In all my years of riding, I came to the conclusion that the saddle is *the* most important component on the bike. Don't try to save money or time by accepting a saddle that is "pretty good" or just adequate. A good saddle that fits you well can make even a mediocre bike feel good...whereas a bad saddle can make a great bike feel rotten. A good saddle is one that you forget about when riding the bike, it doesn't intrude or become uncomfortable after a few hours or more of riding.

Don't compromise, your *ideal saddle* is out there .... somewhere. You just have to find it.

R.
 
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