Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,117 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
http://www.nytimes.com/2005/04/14/h...&en=749efc752fa5c74a&ei=5094&partner=homepage

There's a really interesting article about hyponatremia, when you take on too much water during exercise, on the NY Times site today. The link is above. A study of the disorder argues that while elite athletes drink very little over the course of an event, the much slower, recreational athletes in the same event will drink and drink in an attempt to stay hydrated, and that's where the hit dangerous territory. Check this quote from a doctor and hyponatremia expert.

"Everyone becomes dehydrated when they race," Dr. Noakes said. "But I have not found one death in an athlete from dehydration in a competitive race in the whole history of running. Not one. Not even a case of illness."

However, the story goes on to talk about a runner who became brain dead after the Boston Marathon due to hyponatremia, and many other similar near misses. Essentially if you weigh more at race end than at the start, you are in trouble.

So, how much do you drink over the course of an XC race? I race Sport, usually a little over an hour and a half long, and I'm starting to realize, and this article kind of bolstered the idea, that I don't need to cart the 70 oz. camelbak to get through the effort. What's the formula for drinking enough and not cramping? And what do you think of the info in the article?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Saw it too

Yep, was just about to post the link myself. The article seems to indicate that sodium intake is just as important as water intake, which perhaps makes sports drinks a safer bet than straight water?

A lot of it seems to be exactly what is discussed here, as well, just listening to your body. Any thoughts?

-jms
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,574 Posts
48 hours

I am one of those hydration pack haters and most XC courses in Texas don't allow for much water bottle action. So I figure I'm taking in less then 12oz an hour. This has not put me on the podium lately though:>D

Hydration really begins days --if not weeks --before the race. Thanks for posting that article.
 

·
Submit to your ride!
Joined
·
486 Posts
I think the article is dead on...Go to the Hammer Gel/Ecaps website and read some of their knowledge on the subject of overhydration...

GrantB said:
http://www.nytimes.com/2005/04/14/h...&en=749efc752fa5c74a&ei=5094&partner=homepage

There's a really interesting article about hyponatremia, when you take on too much water during exercise, on the NY Times site today. The link is above. A study of the disorder argues that while elite athletes drink very little over the course of an event, the much slower, recreational athletes in the same event will drink and drink in an attempt to stay hydrated, and that's where the hit dangerous territory. Check this quote from a doctor and hyponatremia expert.

"Everyone becomes dehydrated when they race," Dr. Noakes said. "But I have not found one death in an athlete from dehydration in a competitive race in the whole history of running. Not one. Not even a case of illness."

However, the story goes on to talk about a runner who became brain dead after the Boston Marathon due to hyponatremia, and many other similar near misses. Essentially if you weigh more at race end than at the start, you are in trouble.

So, how much do you drink over the course of an XC race? I race Sport, usually a little over an hour and a half long, and I'm starting to realize, and this article kind of bolstered the idea, that I don't need to cart the 70 oz. camelbak to get through the effort. What's the formula for drinking enough and not cramping? And what do you think of the info in the article?
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top