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Ive been looking at UST tires, they all weigh about 750 grams vs non UST tires, about 400grams. I have a set of Chris King hiubs and Mavic 819 UST rims. Can you run a non tubeless tire, tubeless on tubeless rim?
 

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You can but you don't get the same benefits of a UST tire namely the added durability. Not a problem if you understand this and are prepared for the mishaps that you could possibly endure, for example your sidewalls aren't typically as strong, things like this. All this being said many people simply convert their current, non UST, setup up using a Stan's kit.
 

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carrp12000 said:
Ive been looking at UST tires, they all weigh about 750 grams vs non UST tires, about 400grams. I have a set of Chris King hiubs and Mavic 819 UST rims. Can you run a non tubeless tire, tubeless on tubeless rim?
Standard tires with inner tubes work fine on UST rims.

You are not really comparing the same type of tire if you are looking at 750g UST and 400g standard tires. Those standard tires are generally going to be skinny, fragile, semi-slick XC race tires. Need to look at the 500-600g standard models vs the 700-800g UST (the Bonty TR and Geax TnT tubeless models are lighter though they require sealant).
 

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depends on the tire you are looking at but some UST tires can weigh less. The maxxis ignitor UST in 2.1 they say is 657g. So their are UST tires that weight less then 700g. The way I look at it you are loosing the tube so that is 100 - 150 grams right there so you end up pretty close in terms of overall weight plus you get the benefits of tubeless when you go to UST.
 

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The only real risk is blow-off.

Some people never have a blow-off and may be less cautious than I.

Tips I follow to help ensure a tire works:
1. Use only new tires.
2. Use ones that others have converted successfully.
3. Install with a tube first to shape the tire. This can make it easier to pump up tubeless and I like to think it reduces the risk of blowing off the rim when run tubeless.
4. Once installed tubeless, let it sit overnight to make sure it is holding air flawlessly and does not blow off the rim.
5. For your first ride, stay off the cement and rock and out of fast/dangerous riding in case a tire blows off the rim. The 2-3 tires I have had blow off, and all I have heard about, blow off before use or in the first few miles. It's not good for the rim (and potentially dangerous to the rider) to have this happen on rock or cement or at high speed.

I have had great luck using non-UST Continental tires as tubeless, as long as I get "Protection" ones. Protections are a small bit heavier than "PRO" models due to a thicker sidewall. I had one Pro model blow off a rim and another that developed a weak sidewall after running tubeless for some time. Protection models are perfect so far.

I've also had good luck with Kenda Karmas converted.

So it can be expensive to convert if you pick a tire that fails and have to buy more, but when it works you get all the benefits of tubeless PLUS the lighter weight.
 

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I was comparing UST tires and the forum reccomended looking at Continental Explorer it is supposed to be 650 gr. It is supposed have very good resistance to cutting in Rocky terrain.

My worn out Kenda Nevegals UST weigh 710 gr. I know these are very resistant to cutting in Rocky terrain.

If you take off 100 gr for the tube and add back 20 gr for Stans (yeah this is lowish), you need to find a non UST that would weigh 650-80 or 570 gr.

This would be a pretty light fragile tire.

So it all depends on what terrain you are riding, and whether flatting is an issue.
 

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No problem saving weight and getting strong non-UST tires

jeffscott said:
I was comparing UST tires and the forum reccomended looking at Continental Explorer it is supposed to be 650 gr. It is supposed have very good resistance to cutting in Rocky terrain.

My worn out Kenda Nevegals UST weigh 710 gr. I know these are very resistant to cutting in Rocky terrain.

If you take off 100 gr for the tube and add back 20 gr for Stans (yeah this is lowish), you need to find a non UST that would weigh 650-80 or 570 gr.

This would be a pretty light fragile tire.

So it all depends on what terrain you are riding, and whether flatting is an issue.
Explorer Protection 2.3: 525 gms. (Saving 250 grams per bike over the already "light" Conti Survival UST tires)
Survival Protection 2.1: 570 gms.
Vertical Protection 2.3: 630 gms.

All good tires, NOT fragile, and significantly less weight than most if not all UST tires. Notice they are wide and have good tread as well. These aren't semi-slicks and have strong sidewalls. Give up some tread and you can go lighter of course.

Again, converting has it's risks but reduced weight is a pay off.
 

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More to consider:

These have worked for me:

Huch python 480g - good rear tire
Speci fast trak pro 550g - front or rear.

These are just two that I have had great results. Stan's of course....I have little danger of sidewall slicing on the trails that I ride. I like to take the "risk" for the weight.
 

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noshortcuts said:
Some people never have a blow-off and may be less cautious than I.

Tips I follow to help ensure a tire works:
1. Use only new tires.
2. Use ones that others have converted successfully.
3. Install with a tube first to shape the tire. This can make it easier to pump up tubeless and I like to think it reduces the risk of blowing off the rim when run tubeless.
4. Once installed tubeless, let it sit overnight to make sure it is holding air flawlessly and does not blow off the rim.
5. For your first ride, stay off the cement and rock and out of fast/dangerous riding in case a tire blows off the rim. The 2-3 tires I have had blow off, and all I have heard about, blow off before use or in the first few miles. It's not good for the rim (and potentially dangerous to the rider) to have this happen on rock or cement or at high speed.

I have had great luck using non-UST Continental tires as tubeless, as long as I get "Protection" ones. Protections are a small bit heavier than "PRO" models due to a thicker sidewall. I had one Pro model blow off a rim and another that developed a weak sidewall after running tubeless for some time. Protection models are perfect so far.

I've also had good luck with Kenda Karmas converted.

So it can be expensive to convert if you pick a tire that fails and have to buy more, but when it works you get all the benefits of tubeless PLUS the lighter weight.
OR you could just run a true UST setup and not worry about your tire blowing off your rim or all that other BS you just mentioned.
 

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noshortcuts said:
Explorer Protection 2.3: 525 gms. (Saving 250 grams per bike over the already "light" Conti Survival UST tires)
Survival Protection 2.1: 570 gms.
Vertical Protection 2.3: 630 gms.

All good tires, NOT fragile, and significantly less weight than most if not all UST tires. Notice they are wide and have good tread as well. These aren't semi-slicks and have strong sidewalls. Give up some tread and you can go lighter of course.

Again, converting has it's risks but reduced weight is a pay off.
So I guess that the difference between UST and non UST is getting even closer than I thought.

Hmm, guess I got to find some Conti UST survival protections!!

So run both or just front or back (I really don't like flats).
 
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