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Hybrid Leftys aren't real
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Okay, so this isn't MTB really, and I don't have pics, yet. It's Spring, and I am super busy, so I don't have time to post every odd thing that wanders through. This one came in, and I though of ya'll though. It's a Japanese market Bstone, that this womans father brought back after being stationed there for several years in the 50's. Funky lugs, they are fully encircling tubes, with a light "pointed lug" relief design pressed into them. Lugged all over too. It's a city bike, so it may bore the lot of you, but I thought if a few Bstone folks wanted it, I'd snap a few pics, and take the time to post them, for curiosities sake. :thumbsup:
 

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Stokeless Asshat
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Post away

I`m a geek also.

Jeff
 

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Hybrid Leftys aren't real
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Yep, it ain't light, but it explains it's longevity too, no? As for the seatpost, I haven't put her in the stand yet, but I too, am curious..... I'll be sure to report back. Interestingly, this post binder, http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=408094 though not at all in the same league, has the same thing workin'. Something about bikes posted on Thursdays perhaps? :D
 

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Those lugs are funky. It's like someone starting milling the lugs out of a piece of steel, and then lost interest, but used it anyway.

It's neat to see the old stuff.
 

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As I recall, those lugs were pressure cast around the tubing. The seat cluster might be solid with the seat post using an expanding plug (like how a quill stem is secured).
 

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OK, I found this on Sheldon Brown's site, describing a Bridgestone-made Kabuki:

"The Kabuki line used some unusual construction techniques, specifically, they had a system of sticking the frame tubes into a special mold and forming cast aluminum "lugs" in place around the ends of the tubes. The most notable of this line was the "Submariner" which used un-painted stainless steel tubing, and was marketed in seacoast areas for its rust-resistance. Because the cast aluminum lugs were not flexible like steel lugs, these bikes didn't use a conventional seat-post binder. Instead, they used a seatpost with an expander wedge like that of a handlebar stem...you had to remove the saddle from the seatpost to adjust the height, then re-install the saddle! Even sillier, many of these frames had what looked like a conventional seatpost bolt mounted in a projection of the rigid lug, simply to provide a place to mount a cable stop for the center-pull caliper brake!"
 

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velocipede technician
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wheelsgman said:
OK, I found this on Sheldon Brown's site, describing a Bridgestone-made Kabuki:

"The Kabuki line used some unusual construction techniques, specifically, they had a system of sticking the frame tubes into a special mold and forming cast aluminum "lugs" in place around the ends of the tubes. The most notable of this line was the "Submariner" which used un-painted stainless steel tubing, and was marketed in seacoast areas for its rust-resistance. Because the cast aluminum lugs were not flexible like steel lugs, these bikes didn't use a conventional seat-post binder. Instead, they used a seatpost with an expander wedge like that of a handlebar stem...you had to remove the saddle from the seatpost to adjust the height, then re-install the saddle! Even sillier, many of these frames had what looked like a conventional seatpost bolt mounted in a projection of the rigid lug, simply to provide a place to mount a cable stop for the center-pull caliper brake!"
mayeux, and singer used that type of post. I think herse also?

pic from NAHMBS. forget the builder, he was out of SoCal
 

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artistic...
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hollister said:
mayeux, and singer used that type of post. I think herse also?

pic from NAHMBS. forget the builder, he was out of SoCal
hmm.. there is an euro road bike builder, former hr. champion.. damm, what's his name... uses the same expanding wedge seatpost.
coppi? no. some short name like that.
 

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hey!

wheelsgman said:
OK, I found this on Sheldon Brown's site, describing a Bridgestone-made Kabuki:

"The Kabuki line used some unusual construction techniques, specifically, they had a system of sticking the frame tubes into a special mold and forming cast aluminum "lugs" in place around the ends of the tubes. The most notable of this line was the "Submariner" which used un-painted stainless steel tubing, and was marketed in seacoast areas for its rust-resistance. Because the cast aluminum lugs were not flexible like steel lugs, these bikes didn't use a conventional seat-post binder. Instead, they used a seatpost with an expander wedge like that of a handlebar stem...you had to remove the saddle from the seatpost to adjust the height, then re-install the saddle! Even sillier, many of these frames had what looked like a conventional seatpost bolt mounted in a projection of the rigid lug, simply to provide a place to mount a cable stop for the center-pull caliper brake!"
i'll be darned. i had a 'submariner' in high school! its probably in some junk pile in durango right now- i sold it to buy my '84 high sierra!
 

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Hybrid Leftys aren't real
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
wheelsgman said:
most notable of this line was the "Submariner" which used un-painted stainless steel tubing, and was marketed in seacoast areas for its rust-resistance.
That's great, now have another weird bike I'd like to find....:D Stainless rocks!
 

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colker1 said:
hmm.. there is an euro road bike builder, former hr. champion.. damm, what's his name... uses the same expanding wedge seatpost.
coppi? no. some short name like that.
Not sure about the builder. It can't be Fausto Coppi since he passed away in 1960.;)

Schwinn used a similar design on some of their road and mountain bikes in the late 80's early 90's. The 1989 Schwinn (Aluminum) Pro was one model that did not have a traditional seat binder bolt, plus the "564" road bike.
 
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