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Need to build another low walkway at a local park and the land manager wants it non skid for when wet and in the winter. The decking will be 5-1/4 PT decking. The walkway spans a wet area and will be around 60 feet long. Any recommendations for making the surface non skid and needs to be mountain bike and dog paw friendly? Was thinking the metal lathing for stucco, which I have used ion some log rides, it comes in 4x8 foot sheets and is easily cut up into strips and nailed down with roofing nails. Not sure if that is too sharp. Also was thinking, chicken wire.
 

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Polyurethane , sprinkle in sand when wet.
 

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rough cut decking

People are going to suggest all types of solutions, but the best and easiest is to use rough cut pressure treated deck. The surface isn't slick so you don't need anything added to it.

Ben
 

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metal is tough on dogs feet and does not seem to last. rough cutting decking splinters and wears out faster... the best method i used was with roofing cement as glue and high quality shingles nailed down with galvanized roofing nails. it's also cost effective and easy to apply. just make sure you goop on enough roofing cement to cover the bottom of the cut shingle (3"x shingle width) and space your roofing nails every 2"-3" inches. even if the shingle breaks the roofing cement will hold it. i've also used old mtb tires with this method, though it looks a little bit rough.



of course you can put on as many traction strips as you want...
 

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Rough Cut Decking !

Okay, so your answer is Shingles, man I will go to battle with you over this one, keep the garbage out of the WOODS!! All of the structures at Santos and a number of other projects I have worked on use rough cut decking and NONE of them are splintered and warn out, they all still have amazing traction, even with mold growing on some of them because of all of the moisture. These are heavily ridden structures at destination spots, not just some backyeard project. Trust me find rough cut decking, everything else is amature.
 

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Rough Cut Cedar

Here in Indiana, we found a local saw mill that can supplie rough cut cedar. True 2"x6"x8'. The rough cut provides traction and the bridges look great.





 

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redriderbb said:
Okay, so your answer is Shingles, man I will go to battle with you over this one, keep the garbage out of the WOODS!! All of the structures at Santos and a number of other projects I have worked on use rough cut decking and NONE of them are splintered and warn out, they all still have amazing traction, even with mold growing on some of them because of all of the moisture. These are heavily ridden structures at destination spots, not just some backyeard project. Trust me find rough cut decking, everything else is amature.
oh bs, what works for you might not work for someone else. i should qualify by saying dimensional lumber. i have deck in over 5 years and going strong. where people have rough cut it all fell apart. in my neck of the woods the wood comes from the hopeless despot. we don't have the option of using split cedar or the like. the cost of buying cedar to use is insane (most projects are payed for by ourselves). all the tree's where cut out over 100 years ago and if you are lucky enough to find a cedar deadfall big enough the conservation area won't let you mill/split it.
 

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Megashnauzer said:
http://www.trex.com/
i have not used it but i think it would work.
it is a good idea, the trail structures can even have a waste content from the trash generated in that area. the only problem is it will be slippery to a certain extent unless there can be a texture added to the surface during manufacturing (can be done). with a galvanized steel substructure you can make the whole bridge recyclable... the cost will be high though...
 

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singlesprocket said:
it is a good idea, the trail structures can even have a waste content from the trash generated in that area. the only problem is it will be slippery to a certain extent unless there can be a texture added to the surface during manufacturing (can be done). with a galvanized steel substructure you can make the whole bridge recyclable... the cost will be high though...


Insanely high cost .
 

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Time to Battle...

Okay, the home depot is not your only option. It is a matter of laziness and cheapness on your part...don't ever skimp on materials, that is rule number one. Where are you located, give me a general area if it scares you to tell me the exact town. I will hunt for a supplier for you and list rough cut suppliers on here. You should also look into manufacturing your own planking if money is a huge issue. I know you can't do it there in you park, but you could find someone who has some hardwoods to take down and either take them to a mill or split them with a few gluts and mauls yourself. Also look up a froe, mans best friend when it comes to building your own decking. Your excuses are amature, seriously, don't use crap like shingles and wire for tration, learn how to do it right.

Ben
 

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redriderbb said:
Okay, the home depot is not your only option. It is a matter of laziness and cheapness on your part...don't ever skimp on materials, that is rule number one. Where are you located, give me a general area if it scares you to tell me the exact town. I will hunt for a supplier for you and list rough cut suppliers on here. You should also look into manufacturing your own planking if money is a huge issue. I know you can't do it there in you park, but you could find someone who has some hardwoods to take down and either take them to a mill or split them with a few gluts and mauls yourself. Also look up a froe, mans best friend when it comes to building your own decking. Your excuses are amature, seriously, don't use crap like shingles and wire for tration, learn how to do it right.

Ben
ok mountain man...

it's not crap if the system works, lasts, is solid... so i guess every house/structure built with these materials is trash?
downtown toronto... knock yourself out to make it cost effective
 

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Local sources...don't skimp

http://www.centralfairbank.com/cedar.html toronto lumber supplier. Also does PT stuff.

http://www.torontowoodworkingshow.com/resawingyourownlumber.htm a lumber show that comes through toronto. These guys would be a good network to talk to about materials, log home builders might even have scraps you could get for free.

http://maps.google.com/places/ca/toronto/steeles-ave-w/6815/-alpha-lumber-mills-ltd

Lumber Project Inc.-- http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&sou...,-79.543762&spn=1.058905,2.246704&z=8&iwloc=A

Okay there are four leads. Have you already tried all of these sources, or do you only know about HD, that place is a joke when it come to Lumber and for the record, shingles were never intended to be walked or ridden on. Man, I am not trying to personally insult you, but this whole discussion is one that raises my hackles, and we will just say I am tired of the trash that is out there. Please call these sources and ask if they have or have knowledge of rough cut, full-dimensional materials, that is what you want in either PT or Cedar, since you are in Canada. Good luck in the hunt, and remember DO NOT SKIMP ON MATERIALS...and the galvi nails are not intended to be directly in contact with the elements, they are usually layered under the shingles on a roof, before building trails I did a fair bit of roof work, so I know all about tar paper babies.

Ben
 

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redriderbb said:
http://www.centralfairbank.com/cedar.html toronto lumber supplier. Also does PT stuff.

http://www.torontowoodworkingshow.com/resawingyourownlumber.htm a lumber show that comes through toronto. These guys would be a good network to talk to about materials, log home builders might even have scraps you could get for free.

http://maps.google.com/places/ca/toronto/steeles-ave-w/6815/-alpha-lumber-mills-ltd

Lumber Project Inc.-- http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&sou...,-79.543762&spn=1.058905,2.246704&z=8&iwloc=A

Okay there are four leads. Have you already tried all of these sources, or do you only know about HD, that place is a joke when it come to Lumber and for the record, shingles were never intended to be walked or ridden on. Man, I am not trying to personally insult you, but this whole discussion is one that raises my hackles, and we will just say I am tired of the trash that is out there. Please call these sources and ask if they have or have knowledge of rough cut, full-dimensional materials, that is what you want in either PT or Cedar, since you are in Canada. Good luck in the hunt, and remember DO NOT SKIMP ON MATERIALS...and the galvi nails are not intended to be directly in contact with the elements, they are usually layered under the shingles on a roof, before building trails I did a fair bit of roof work, so I know all about tar paper babies.

Ben
yeah let me open wallet here and buy lumber from a boutique yuppy contractor supplier (better be cheaper then 25 cents a liner ft) and have you been to the woodworking show here in town? i have and it is not what you think. my building techniques are sound and do work for my location (and been proven to last). your pretty arrogant and closed minded in your assumptions that this does not work or my work building technique is shoddy. as a matter of fact i got the idea looking at old wood bridge and railroad trestle around here. since they are still around... i've also used a similar technique in a couple free stall dairy farms near ashville/gastonia nc to stabilize surfaces when i was in the ag biz. annnd the dynamic point load of a mtber is a feather compared to the sharp hooves of a monster holstein...
 

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Stand by what I say...

I know it is brash. But, like I said, turns up my hackles. I am in the Asheville area, with an E. I am sure you feel confident in what you have done. My point is this: If you are going to build a wooden structure don't skimp on materials, what you have had to do is amature, as I stated above. If it were pro you would buy the right materials for what you need. The OP is asking about non skid solutions - THE BEST is to use rough cut lumber. Your solution is a simple tar band-aid pun intended. You cannot possibly argure that for a riding surface it is BETTER to use a cheap surface treatment, than it is to use a rough cut material. I will stand by that statement ROUGH CUT LUMBER IS THE !! BEST !! SOLUTION. Everything else is compromise. Your compromise is money...and for the record Home Depot is not your only option...as you stated.

Ben - sorry to offend.
 

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HarryCallahan said:
No need to be abusive. It undercuts anything helpful you might say. :)
and rough hewn wood is not a option in all areas, nor should it be considered the
the only best option... my money is on stone work... but you have to be flexable with the materials you have at your local and utilize them in the best possible and innovative ways...
 

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redriderbb comes across as a jerk, and I don't agree with the 'tude, but my experience with shingles as traction enhancers is that they are poor materials for the application.

I used to pay for trail materials myself, too. These days I'd rather spend a little time fundraising at local shops and from friends (everybody knows some doctor/lawyer types who ride) and spend other's money on quality stuff than skimp on materials or build quality. (ahem, which I've done in the past...)

Singlesprocket, I don't think you're lazy, if you were you wouldn't be out doing trail work. But if its a matter of what to buy with a limited budget, maybe expanding the budget would offer more options. Have you ever asked home depot (or Lowes, or 86, or...) for a donation? We did, thinking they wouldn't even give us the time of day. Two truckloads of lumber, fasteners, and a new sledge hammer later we were mighty glad we asked.

BTW, if rough cut just isn't around my vote goes for treated lumber cross-hatched with a circular saw blade set to cut 3/8" deep. Do what you want, but don't take the burden of purchasing materials all on yourself. Work smarter, not poorer.
 
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