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SUBLIM8er
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm new to the 29inch world and here's my question: I'm interested in the idea of running a 29 in front with a 26rear. So, what forks would work for this application assuming it's doable? The frameset is an old school ('95) Tange prestige Stumpy.
 

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minister of chaos
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Axis II said:
I'm new to the 29inch world and here's my question: I'm interested in the idea of running a 29 in front with a 26rear. So, what forks would work for this application assuming it's doable? The frameset is an old school ('95) Tange prestige Stumpy.
For that application, I'd find the shortest fork possible, maybe a Surly Cross Check fork. Even then, it will raise the front end of the bike by an inch and a half, slackening the head angle by about 2 degrees. It will have a big effect on the handling of the bike. It might work to feel how the tyre rolls over obstacles, but It will handle a lot slower that what you are used to.

Frank
 

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Is the frame built for a sussy fork?

I had a stumpy from the same vintage but I'm sure it was built for a short rigid fork. I put a sussy fork on it but it choppered it out a bit. If it's made for a 3" stroke fork you're in business. The X check would be an option as would the Dimensions disk only 26" fork. It'll fit the nano with a teeny bit of clearance and you should be all set.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Fastskiguy said:
I had a stumpy from the same vintage but I'm sure it was built for a short rigid fork. I put a sussy fork on it but it choppered it out a bit. If it's made for a 3" stroke fork you're in business. The X check would be an option as would the Dimensions disk only 26" fork. It'll fit the nano with a teeny bit of clearance and you should be all set.
Sweeet! Now I'm getting the fever. As it turns out the frame is sussy kind. I had a Judy XC on it when new. I think this frameset was one of the first years that the stumpy geometry was tweeked for front suspension. So, what about carbon fiber options? I've handled the X check fork and was turned off by the considerable weight. Don't get me wrong, I like steel. One of my all time fav steel forks was the Ritchy Logic. It ate up the bumps and was light. Another question I have is about foot clearance with that big wheel up front with the 26er geometry.
 

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Pace?

I think those sweet carbon mtb forks are Pace made in the UK (correct me somebody if I'm wrong). My understanding is that they are a little tricky to get in the US if that is where you are located. Somebody please help me with the details! Or you could try a carbon cross fork, some will fit the mutanoraptor 44c tire but it's a little thin for the whole 29" experience.

I think you should consider just getting something cheap because you may want to upgrade to the 29X29 format soon and you don't want to have a ton of money stuck in your "half breed" bike. Take it from me, I been there man! Think cheap, not light!
 

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Get a nice short fork...

Typical sussy-corrected frames from that era were built for 440mm forks (give or take a few mm) so to keep your old geometry, you'd need a ~400mm one. That's not going to happen (at least not with any decent tire clearance) but anything in the 410mm range you can find with 700c canti posts or a disc mount should work, and it won't slack things out ridiculously.

-Walt
 

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With narrower 29" tires such as the hard-to-get Maxxis HighRoller, and the easily available Conti Vapor and Schwalbe Little Albert, you could get away with a fat carbon cross fork. Bram once posted pics on his setup he once ran. It worked well with the Maxxis Highroller, and I think a teammate even made it work with a Nanoraptor. Those cross forks are relativel cheap, and only 400mm. Possibly even more offset than the 410mm MTB Dimension disc fork, which is good. You MAY get away with the Dimension Cross disc fork, but you'd have to try that one first to be sure, it's 400mm as well.
Prepare to also put the biggest possible rear tire on the bike that'll fit, to not notice the now relatively harsh rear, as the front will be plush. 29/26 setups are fun. Not the ral deal, but fun nevertheless, it really transforms the ride. Very cool, if you manage to keep geometry the same.
Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Cloxxki said:
With narrower 29" tires such as the hard-to-get Maxxis HighRoller, and the easily available Conti Vapor and Schwalbe Little Albert, you could get away with a fat carbon cross fork. Bram once posted pics on his setup he once ran. It worked well with the Maxxis Highroller, and I think a teammate even made it work with a Nanoraptor. Those cross forks are relativel cheap, and only 400mm. Possibly even more offset than the 410mm MTB Dimension disc fork, which is good. You MAY get away with the Dimension Cross disc fork, but you'd have to try that one first to be sure, it's 400mm as well.
Prepare to also put the biggest possible rear tire on the bike that'll fit, to not notice the now relatively harsh rear, as the front will be plush. 29/26 setups are fun. Not the ral deal, but fun nevertheless, it really transforms the ride. Very cool, if you manage to keep geometry the same.
Good luck!
OK, the plot thickens. But, it still sounds doable if I'm reading your posts correctly. So, can I now assume that any 400mm crosser fork will fly on this rig? One other consideration to throw into the mix is that I really want to run tubeless. Not a UST setup mind you, but Stans. I've gone two seasons in a row without a flat w/ the Stans and I don't want to look back at the tube if I don't absolutely have to. What this means is that I'm going to have to go with a Stans kind front niner tire. What niner tire options are Stans kind and will these tire options be appropriate for the 400mm cross forks you guys are steering me towards? I should also mention that this rig will be a SS.
 

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You'll need the very fattest carbon cross fork anyway, which will take some searching. The ones I know are from obscure cheaper brands, but still plenty costly.

There's been countless Stan's related threads on here, but on narrower tires I think success is a bit rare. Kenda's work, but are really knobby, IRC Mythos are volumous. If you know the Stan's magic well, perhaps the Canti's work for you. Schwalbes have worked well for me in 26", but Walt had bad luck with the 28" Little Albert I seem to remember. Wire Nanoraptors work well I hear, an I guess can be made to work with the righ fork.
 

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Axis II said:
I'm new to the 29inch world and here's my question: I'm interested in the idea of running a 29 in front with a 26rear. So, what forks would work for this application assuming it's doable? The frameset is an old school ('95) Tange prestige Stumpy.
I've used the already mentioned Dimension disc mtb fork successfully with a 29er wheel. It didn't mess up the geometry too bad because I was also able to squeeze a 29er rear wheel in the back (bike w/ good clearance and long fork ends...ran it as a fixie), but it was a weird riding bike.

My opinion on this subject though leads me to one conclusion....forget the mullet approach and just get the real deal. You're going to end up dropping some serious coin on a carbon cross fork that will allow you to run a skinny 29er tire. After that, you'll decide that you want to try a 29/29 and the $$ you just spent on the carbon cross fork will be wasted. Just buy a Karate Monkey for a couple hundred bucks and be done with it. Sure it weighs a bit more than you'd like, but it's cheap and you won't notice the few extra grams when you can't wipe the $hit eatin grin off your face.
 

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Moonhead Fork

I'm local to the Moonhead Machine guys, and like to bug em from time to time to see what they're up to. A lot of cranks they're pretty protective of. But oh boy do they have a fork underway. The thing's easily the coolest fork I've ever seen. They initially designed them around a five inch travel 29er front end, and are tuning them now for shorter lengths. Sounds like they'll basically make whatever length you want, & are looking at two crowns for a 45mm and 37mm offset. They were all disc brake models, and oh my god were they beautiful. Sounds like they're pretty near full-on production too. They wouldn't let me get a pic, but that is gonna be one fine fork.
 

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Master Shake said:
I'm local to the Moonhead Machine guys, and like to bug em from time to time to see what they're up to. A lot of cranks they're pretty protective of. But oh boy do they have a fork underway. The thing's easily the coolest fork I've ever seen. They initially designed them around a five inch travel 29er front end, and are tuning them now for shorter lengths. Sounds like they'll basically make whatever length you want, & are looking at two crowns for a 45mm and 37mm offset. They were all disc brake models, and oh my god were they beautiful. Sounds like they're pretty near full-on production too. They wouldn't let me get a pic, but that is gonna be one fine fork.
Whoa.
 

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SUBLIM8er
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
qtip said:
I've used the already mentioned Dimension disc mtb fork successfully with a 29er wheel. It didn't mess up the geometry too bad because I was also able to squeeze a 29er rear wheel in the back (bike w/ good clearance and long fork ends...ran it as a fixie), but it was a weird riding bike.

My opinion on this subject though leads me to one conclusion....forget the mullet approach and just get the real deal. You're going to end up dropping some serious coin on a carbon cross fork that will allow you to run a skinny 29er tire. After that, you'll decide that you want to try a 29/29 and the $$ you just spent on the carbon cross fork will be wasted. Just buy a Karate Monkey for a couple hundred bucks and be done with it. Sure it weighs a bit more than you'd like, but it's cheap and you won't notice the few extra grams when you can't wipe the $hit eatin grin off your face.
Ok, I'll bite. I believe that even a mullet deserves it's just rewards. Having said that, I take your point and now am leaning away from a carbon front fork option. I'm out of my WW comfort zone on this forum here but, I still am keeping the dream alive that a niner on the front w/the 6 in back has it's attractions and natural gifts too. The real attraction to the niner wheel (in my humble opinion) is the advantage that it offers in terms of angle of attack on obstacles in your path. The advantage is that it basically lets you role over things with less effort than the 6er option, aye?. That's all good but, it comes at the cost off greater weight and not just any weight but rotational mass which, is the most critical. So....this leads my to scratch my head and wonder why would one want a 9er on the rear where the advantages of angle of attack are much less critical than on the front end? And, in the end I suspect that it is a matter of compromise between weight and rugged terrain performance. I can hear the arguements already about the larger contact patch on the rear which, will enable me to generate more traction and therefore velocity but, I have no complaints about traction now with my main 6er rig. This leads me to my final thought which is why not just take my original 6er Tange Prestige rigid fork that came with the frameset and have the canti bosses re-brazed at the appropriate 9er position? This would seem to satisfy everyone's concerns over cost and the paint scheme will match my frame to boot!
 

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29er front on a 26" hardtail frame

I've built up a bike whose main purpose is a local race and to experiment with 29" parts. The frame is a 26" aluminum hardtail, designed for an 80mm fork, SID Race. I put a Kinesis Cross fork on it, I don't think it is a current model, so I can't tell you if the current Kinesis forks are equivalent. I got mine on ebay for $80, current ones I see on e-tailer sites are $180 or so. Aluminum blades and steerer, no disc tabs. With the star nut and the steerer cut to whatever it is, weighs 670 gm I think, which is about 150 more than an Alpha Cross fork with compression nut in it that I have, and I think it is the lightest one around. The alpha fork can tolerate a Mutanoraptor 44, but a Little Albert won't fit, unless I grind down some knobs, which I might do. :D I have an Exiwolf in the Kinesis now and it has plenty of room. Run regular v brakes, Avids. Steers better than any suspension fork I have ever had. I think the head angle slackened to about 70 from 71 degrees, but for what I want it is better, and quite honestly I can't see any problem on the single tracks I ride. It steers so much more precisely, if it steers slower I don't mind. With the Exi on it, seems like the SID fork with a 26x2.1, but weighs less.

Walt is building me a frame that will have about the same geometry specifically built for the Alpha Cross fork and Mutano 44's, and I will also run the Kinesis fork and Exi/Nano's. That frame should be here in a week or so. I'll run an update on that bike when I get it built up.

I'd say go for the Kinesis cross fork if you can find one and an Exi still fits. I have been very pleased with the 29/6er. With the slack geometry and the Exi on the front ( I like to run bigger tires on the front with more agressive tread than the rear) this thing RAILS!!!! through 30 mph downhill logging roads, I havn't found the limits yet, but I'm going faster than I want to fall as it is so I don't plan on pushing it. I think it rolls through rock gardens better than the SID/26" wheels, I just need to keep my arms loose and point it in the right direction. Running the Nano on the front is faster, nearly as cush, and will likely be the tire I run most often when it try dries out (still some snow on the ground in several places I ride).
 

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SUBLIM8er
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
lithiapark said:
I've built up a bike whose main purpose is a local race and to experiment with 29" parts. The frame is a 26" aluminum hardtail, designed for an 80mm fork, SID Race. I put a Kinesis Cross fork on it, I don't think it is a current model, so I can't tell you if the current Kinesis forks are equivalent. I got mine on ebay for $80, current ones I see on e-tailer sites are $180 or so. Aluminum blades and steerer, no disc tabs. With the star nut and the steerer cut to whatever it is, weighs 670 gm I think, which is about 150 more than an Alpha Cross fork with compression nut in it that I have, and I think it is the lightest one around. The alpha fork can tolerate a Mutanoraptor 44, but a Little Albert won't fit, unless I grind down some knobs, which I might do. :D I have an Exiwolf in the Kinesis now and it has plenty of room. Run regular v brakes, Avids. Steers better than any suspension fork I have ever had. I think the head angle slackened to about 70 from 71 degrees, but for what I want it is better, and quite honestly I can't see any problem on the single tracks I ride. It steers so much more precisely, if it steers slower I don't mind. With the Exi on it, seems like the SID fork with a 26x2.1, but weighs less.

Walt is building me a frame that will have about the same geometry specifically built for the Alpha Cross fork and Mutano 44's, and I will also run the Kinesis fork and Exi/Nano's. That frame should be here in a week or so. I'll run an update on that bike when I get it built up.

I'd say go for the Kinesis cross fork if you can find one and an Exi still fits. I have been very pleased with the 29/6er. With the slack geometry and the Exi on the front ( I like to run bigger tires on the front with more agressive tread than the rear) this thing RAILS!!!! through 30 mph downhill logging roads, I havn't found the limits yet, but I'm going faster than I want to fall as it is so I don't plan on pushing it. I think it rolls through rock gardens better than the SID/26" wheels, I just need to keep my arms loose and point it in the right direction. Running the Nano on the front is faster, nearly as cush, and will likely be the tire I run most often when it try dries out (still some snow on the ground in several places I ride).
Nice rig. I'm glad to hear that I'm not alone in my belief that the 9/6 can work well. The Kenesis sounds like a good option. I've never ridden one but have talked to people with this fork and they all say it has some good micro-suspension properties much like the old school Ritchy Logic fork. Now I'm seriously thinking about going the original fork option with the 26 Tange Prestige ridgid fork that came with the frameset. I'll have to have Bob Brown move the cant bosses up the legs for me but my only concern is with foot clearance. Maybe if this is a problem I can have him rake out the fork just enough so that my toes won't hit the tire on tight turns? However, this will wreck my original paint scheme! :D This is a work in progress. Keep the suggestions flying. BTW, what's that I see in your pics on your bars? Are those aero bars?
 

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That Kenesis could be quite rare, it seems to be around 420mm tall? CX forks normally stick to 400mm, leaving little room for a tire, let alone with such a tall unicrown. If I could find a similar fork, at that weight, I would probably even have a frame built around it :)
Is that a 2.1" Schwalbe out back on that bike? Try a Fast Fred 2.25 or 2.35 once, it's perfect for smooth courses. The OEM 2.25's I've seen were 460g, the earliest 2.35's (57mm on 21mm rim) were 495g.
Very nice conversion, great bike!
 

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Kinesis cross fork

Cloxxki said:
That Kenesis could be quite rare, it seems to be around 420mm tall? CX forks normally stick to 400mm, leaving little room for a tire, let alone with such a tall unicrown. If I could find a similar fork, at that weight, I would probably even have a frame built around it :)
Is that a 2.1" Schwalbe out back on that bike? Try a Fast Fred 2.25 or 2.35 once, it's perfect for smooth courses. The OEM 2.25's I've seen were 460g, the earliest 2.35's (57mm on 21mm rim) were 495g.
Very nice conversion, great bike!
The Kinesis fork seems to be uncommon, now. It is 415-420 axle to crown, you are right! When I bought it they were being closed out and Icycles had a whole bunch of them, 2 or 3 different rakes. I think mine has 38mm rake, it was the least rake they had, but toe clearance is not a problem for my Sidi 45's, and any additional slowness the diminished rake adds is a good think I think for the purpose of this bike (stability at higher speeds), and hasn't been a problem on any singletrack I've run so far.

The rear tire is a Fast Fred 2.25, it looks small compared to the Exi doesn't it? :D What pressure do you like to run on hardpacked courses? I am at 42-45 now, but still fiddling.

Those are "Kustom" aerobars. Bar ends cut short with light wood dowel blued in, zip tied to the brakes for extra support, but surprisingly stiff. The course this bike is designed for has 15+ miles of slight flat/rollers, and 2-3 miles of downhill smooth fire road that I spin out a 46/11 on and can get into a tuck and relax. On the slightly uphill sections of fireroad they are great when the 20mph headwinds pop up, I don't go backward anymore :p
 
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