Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
66 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
G'day everyone,

After purchasing a new 2003 Specialized Epic Comp in May this year from an auction (bike shop went broke - got bike for 2000AUD) it was my intention to get all servicing and repairs done by my local bike shop. After discovering that my local bike mechanic was a goose and could not even obtain Maxxis Holy Roller tyres (waited 3 months before finally getting overnight online!!) I decided to take the plunge and buy a Park AK-32 toolkit, Park lubes and greases and a Topeak Prep Stand along with Barnett's Analysis and Procedures for Bicycle Mechanics manual.

However I forgot to purchase the most important tool in my opinion and that is a torque wrench so any advice on which wrench would serve me best would be appreciated. I have been looking at Park and Pedros products to date.

Once I got the wrench sorted all I need is the courage and intestinal fortitude to start pulling my bike apart which to be honest scares the hell out if me!! I can seet it now, my bike in pieces with me standing there with no bloody idea of how to put it back together.

Cheers

Mullos
 

·
EDR
Joined
·
10,314 Posts
You don't have to get a bike specific torque wrench per say. I mean a Pedro's wrench is no different than any other wrench in that specified torque range and may cost much more, maybe not I don't know. Check your local hardware stores. Look for a wrench that most of your torque needs will fall into the middle range of the wrenches specs. Meaning...if you most torquing will be around 25 to 50 inch/pounds then find a wrench that measure somewhere around 10 to 100 inch/pounds. Not one that measures 25 to 250 inch/pounds. These ranges are examples of US standard, I assume you're an Aussie so maybe metric will be the way in your part of the world.

All i'm saying is that wrenches are much more accurate at the middle of their specified ranges then at the very bottom or very top of their windows.

Do you have a Sears store? Good place to look, at least here in the US...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,382 Posts
Doing your own work really isn't that bad, especially with resources like Park's new website on hand. Take your time, and pay atttention to where everything goes and you'll be fine. Once you start, you'll wonder why you ever bothered taking your bike in to the LBS :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,898 Posts
getting a full kit is nice, but a bit overkill... main things you'll be doing are adjusting spokes, deraillers, brakes and occassionally saddle and stem... bearings are all sealed cartridge so no repacking required, replace the chain 1x year or so and just wash and lube on weekends. no need to disassemble anything, yet, and if the time comes, focus on that one part/project only.

for torquing, a torque wrench is nice, but a luxury. considering most parts are soft alu or mg, use a light touch. start all screws with your fingers (no gloves either). clean all threads. dont grip your wrenchs at the ends for final torquing on low load bits. snug nuts and bolts, dont jam them in place. steel parts are more forgiving, but you still dont want to tighten so much that breaking it loose becomes a problem in itself. leaving something under torqued (but snug) and having to retighten is better than overtightening and stripping parts... i dont think you could helicoil a frame's bottom bracket shell for instance...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
346 Posts
Ahh don't worry. If you're at all mechanically inclined you'll have no problem.

Just do things slowly, pay attention to things as they are coming apart and never, never, never force anything.

I'm a decent home mechanic (cars) and I just put together a bike I bought as a frame/fork/kit, having no bike building experience. Since the wheels were already built and the frame and fork came with the bearing cups pressed on it was super easy. Best part is now I understand how everything works so I won't freak out if something breaks or starts acting strange on the trail.
 

·
Vaginatarian
Joined
·
5,685 Posts
I've been wrenching my own bike for a couple of years now and I just bought a torque wrench last week. Most fasteners on bikes use inch lbs. not ft. lbs but you can get by if you're carefull, I just got a MIT 1/4" click torque wrench from Nashbar. Just because you want to do your own work does'nt mean you have to do all, start off slow and let the shop do the harder stuff untill you feel confident
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
66 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Many thanks for assistance.

Thank you all for your replies and assistance - yeah I did go a bit overboard with the kit, I think I'm a little compulsive like that - hell I even got the Pedro's Super Pit Kit - I need help!!

The only work I have done on bike so far has been changing tyres (Maxxis Holy Roller), Adjusting Brakes, Cleaning Chain, adjusting suspension for my weight and lubing all parts as directed by the Barnetts Manual.

I can see myself getting into it big time as the satisfaction of doing it yourself and seeing the results is excellent. Doing it slowly with a icy cold beer does not hurt either!!

Cheers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,898 Posts
Mullos said:
I can see myself getting into it big time as the satisfaction of doing it yourself and seeing the results is excellent. Doing it slowly with a icy cold beer does not hurt either!!

Cheers.
yeah... and then you start buying used bikes for cheap, stripping them for parts, building them for friends... good way to learn, btw, buy a cheap (but nice) used bike and hack on it. no tears if you mess up, spare parts if you need, a spare bike otherwise and it'll allow you to try out different frame sizes, styles etc.

always alway always check and double check threading on cranks and pedals. one side is reverse threaded.

after about the 6th beer, i always forget which screw is for high/low adjustment on deraillers. working slowly seems to be the only option when there's beer involved...
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top