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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone. New to the forum and to mountain biking really. I got this bike from a friend and was curious if anyone could tell me anything about it? I can tell you the brakes don't work great and it doesn't shift through all the gears in the back Curious if it's worth putting time/money into and if anyone has any how-to videos or places to start on fixing the brakes and shifting. Not looking to do anything crazy but would like to be able to ride it around.

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That looks like it could be a late 90's early 2000's Demo.

As far as getting up to speed, it probably needs a brake fluid flush and bleed along with some new pads. That'll get you stopped. As far as the drivetrain, possibly a new chain/cassette/chainrings. If you do the work yourself, you'd probably have $400-$500 in parts maybe?
 

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Thanks for the response and that resource. I'll look into and try to get this thing going again. Do you know anything about this bike? Curious what level bike it is and how old. I'm guessing it's old from what little I've been able to find.
That right there is a 2000 Specialized Big Hit, a freeride bike.
Here's a link you can check the specs out:
 

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Wow an expensive bike back in 2000. Worth fixing?
yes worth fixing. as long as you can freshen up the parts, cables, brake fluid and the shock, yes.

worth riding ? yes, but todays bikes and geometries and 1x drivetrains work a bit better in all sorts of terrain.
but that thing was tops in it's day and can be ridden just fine today....dirt and rock hasn't changed.
 

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Wow an expensive bike back in 2000. Worth fixing?
"Worth" is up to you. Is it a bike that can be tuned up into rideable condition? Absolutely! It's not the latest and greatest currently out there, but it was a very good bike in its time.

My one and only MTB right now was a top-of-the line hardtail XC race frame when I bought it new a bit over 20 years ago. It still goes up and down hills when I pedal it. I have it stripped down to a singlespeed, and it's a ton of fun.
 

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Hi everyone. New to the forum and to mountain biking really. I got this bike from a friend and was curious if anyone could tell me anything about it? I can tell you the brakes don't work great and it doesn't shift through all the gears in the back Curious if it's worth putting time/money into and if anyone has any how-to videos or places to start on fixing the brakes and shifting. Not looking to do anything crazy but would like to be able to ride it around.
"Worth" is a relative term. I'd service the beast just for the sake of it. But all things considered - it is a great bike from two decades ago. Even if everything is fine ( nothing broken, cracked, bent etc ), then you will need to, at the minimum, bleed the brakes, service the suspension and replace shift cables. You might need to replace suspension bearings and/or even pivots.

All depends how hard the bike was being used and when was the last time it was actually fully operational.

Brakes might need replacement as seals might be leaking at this point, it is 20 year old bike. Brake seals are either custom job or warrant brake replacement - almost certainly not available as service kits.

Bleeding brakes is doable for a home mechanic, although might require some try and error.

Suspension might be a toughie. Rear shock almost certainly requires to be serviced by a professional - those things are routinely difficult to service without a service manual and service kits. And you want to service it, as riding with a blown shock is a miserable experience.

The fork - Marzocchi of the time was doing everything in open oil bath. Works great, smooth etc. But also requires oil seals which might or might not be available and might or might not require replacement. If you get them - servicing those forks is easy as most stuff just requires a flush. They will literally go on forever.

Gears are the easiest - assuming everything is fine - an adjustment after replacement of all cables and adjustment. If not - compatible parts are readily available and you can upgrade to as far as modern 12 speed if you so choose.

Overall - you will probably need to spend more then the bike is worth, but in the end you are going to get a high quality bike with a rather ancient geometry. But you will be able to get pretty rowdy with it - especially if you invest in some modern tires.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks everyone! Great advice and tips. I'm not even sure if my plan is to ever take it on any major trails but i like that it's a quality bike and worth fixing. Right now I think I need to get the front brake working. Sounds like bleeding it would be good so Ill have to look into that. I am. familiar with doing this on motorcycle/dirtbike. The one that stumps me after watching videos is the rear shifting. The problem I have is the shifter on the bars does not continue to shift in order to get the derailer to move it into 1st. it stops like in the middle and then pushing it doesnt do anything. Is this an issue with the shifter itself? I cant see how adjusting anything on the derailer or cables would help if the shifter itself it stopping halfway through. Does that make sense?
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks everyone! Great advice and tips. I'm not even sure if my plan is to ever take it on any major trails but i like that it's a quality bike and worth fixing. Right now I think I need to get the front brake working. Sounds like bleeding it would be good so Ill have to look into that. I am. familiar with doing this on motorcycle/dirtbike. The one that stumps me after watching videos is the rear shifting. The problem I have is the shifter on the bars does not continue to shift in order to get the derailer to move it into 1st. it stops like in the middle and then pushing it doesnt do anything. Is this an issue with the shifter itself? I cant see how adjusting anything on the derailer or cables would help if the shifter itself it stopping halfway through. Does that make sense?
Question too, do I need special brake fluid or can I use normal dot 3 or 4?
 

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Check Park Tools or Sheldon Brown for how to video's. Depending on the brand of brakes ,they could use dot 3 or 4. It might say on the master cover. The shifter could need to be flushed or the derailleur cable tightened . With the chain on the smallest cog and the shifter in the highest number ,the cable should be taut to tight .You should be able to find info in the Specialized archives or on bikepedia.
 

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Question too, do I need special brake fluid or can I use normal dot 3 or 4?
I believe Hayes are Dot 3 or 4.
The one diff is i think motorcycles usually has an external open resivour? Bikes are small sealed resivour so bleeding usually uses a cup that threads to fill plug and a syringe at the caliper side bleed plug to push fluid through. I havent done those older Hayes tho, im sure you can find instructions online.
The shifter could be a few issues. Lever itself is not common, except when old and neglected the grease gets hard and gunky. But that usually causes problems through the whole range. You could try shooting cleaner and then oil into it. The more involved fix is take it apart, but be warned there are little parts and can be complex.
Check that the cable is not binding. Its possible the cable is kinked or corroded.
its also possible its missadjusted.
Click the shifter until its all the way to highest gear position (snallest cog). There should be very little tension on the inner cable. Loosen the clamp at the dérailleur and see if it the derailleur now moves to position. Tighten cable clamp at this position and see if tou get full range now.
 

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Coming from a guy who rides an 04 enduro id say its well worth fixing!!
There are plenty of sources for good used parts.
Amazon has some shimano hydro brakes for very cheap and they work, those hayes 9's may be shot.
The rest is really basic maintenence and fork seals and shock rebuild wont brake your budget.
Very cool bike!!!
 

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I'd start off and replace the major wear items.

Cables and housings being de facto. Should be pretty much nonnegotiable on these.

Old shimano shifters get nasty inside and start to die. Hose out the internals with Clean Streak, let dry, lube with something light like tri-flow. If that doesn't recover the shifter (replace cables and housings at the same time), then a new shifter may be in order. If a new shifter is needed, you might start considering a modest drivetrain upgrade. Lots of options for a bike like this one that are fairly inexpensive.

I'd also definitely service the suspension and bleed the brakes. You will need to look them up (check with Hayes) to find out what fluid to use and what fittings you'll need for a bleed kit.

That Specialized Shark Fin brake adapter just by itself might get you some attention from folks who want to put disc brakes on an old frame. Occasionally folks pop in here asking for a similar sort of adapter. A few different similar types of adapters were made in the early 2000's and I don't think any of them are still made.
 
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