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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
check it out guys, the new prototype womens bike. super small sizes, low standover, new linkage, etc.







Kyle,
 

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Oh, there she is. I saw Kevin in line but didn't look at the bike. Rode the gondy up with Kyle before his last run and we talked a bit about it. Sexy looking bike. My wife will like seeing these pics.

BTW Kyle, lookin good on the DS course! :thumbsup:

We had a great time up there this weekend.:)
 

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Sorry but I can't see past the funbags on that blond chick in camo on the right....very nice:ihih:

ps: Seriously though, very nice looking bike.
 

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Cool. It's nice to see a FR bike for women/shorter people. Not that I fit into either category, but still....



Just curious, what was the reasoning for going to that linkage? Was it easier to fit that into the smaller frame? It looks pretty compact. It looks like a similar bike to the BR in a way, just smaller. Is that more or less accurate?
 

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Wow....thats sexy, I love the look of it and the decal kit (from the sicklines article) is a great idea IMO. I remember talking to the guys about this at the show in Van....its good to see it come out...now I have a bike to recommend to all the women riders that I talk to.
 

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Rode it yesterday...

My take: Great job guys! :thumbsup:

I liked it. It's hard to tell just riding around in the gravel parking lot, but overall, I had a great impression. It felt a lot like my bottle rocket, but was a bit higher up (the bottom bracket), had a shorter cockpit, and a slacker headtube (the BR has a 67), but is a hell of a lot lighter than the BR. There are 3 sizes, small, med and large, the small was too small for me (I'm 5'4") and the med fit perfectly. The small is going to be great for smaller riders. They aren't done tweaking the bike yet, but it's going to be a great bike for us women.
We tried to talk them into having a demo day so us women can go test it out on the trail, hopefully they'll consider this.

Overall impression, if I didn't already own a freeride bike, the bottle rocket, I'd be all over this bike!!!
 

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More Riding Less Internet
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
the siren (in comparison to the BR) has

shorter chainstays
shorter headtube
lower BB (by .02 inches)
lower standover
lighter weight
etc.

Kyle,
 

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Loved it!

I was lucky enough to take both the small and the medium for some runs up at Whistler during Crankworx. I have been waiting for the release of this bike for months and months and Transition did not let me down. Here's what I thought;

The small was too small and compact, and I'm only 5'2" with a 30" inseam. It was rideable but my knees and elbows seemed to get in one anothers way on cornering. The rear tire buzzed me a couple times on steep descents due to it's compactness as well, and the fork seemed really raked out on the small. The stand over on the small is not good unfortunately. Since the top tube is shortend, the angled portion comes down closer to the seat tube taking stand over away. If it's any consolation, I could still put my feet down while sitting in the saddle. Bike seemed solid enough.

Now for the good stuff! The medium fit so well it was like it was custom made for me (though I know some gals who are 5'10" who said that the medium fit them too). It is hard to put in words how good the bike felt and how it kept inspiring me to try more and more things I didn't think I would ever do on a 6" travel bike. These were the things I normally reserve for my 8" travel bike that I've been riding for 3 1/2 seasons. Things like A-line Rock drop, Schleyer Rock drop, 3rd drop in the Joyride drop park and then there was the air time on Dirt to Lower A-line, Heart of Darkness.... backsiding the tables one after another. :thumbsup: I was really amazed with the ride. Each landing was plush, take offs smooth for the most part (there may be an issue of lateral flex when pumping the face of some jumps at high speed, more research is needed and I'll be glad to volunteer!). In the air the bike felt light and maneuverable, such a change from what I'm used to. I just wanted to keep riding it but knew I had to let some other folks have a chance. There were many times later that weekend where I wished I was on the Siren instead of my DH bike. I would love to try it out up on Garbanzo, and I definitely want to try it pedaling somewhere like Galbraith. That's where I really need a bike like this, light enough to pedal, but tough enough to take a beating, and short and balanced enough for me to feel comfortable riding ladders and bridges (it did super on Devil's Club, tracked beautifully, cornered tight).

So that's probably longer than most people like to read, but I could go on and on about how much fun it was to ride. Looking forward to the next opportunity.:yesnod:
 

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Can't forget...

I shouldn't forget to mention that the head angle seemed steeper on the medium (better), and it was still super comfortable taking it down all of Upper Joyride. I just want to keep emphasizing the fact that these were things I felt OK doing on my DH bike of 3 1/2 years but was breezing through on the Siren first run through.:cornut:
 

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Siren FR review

This is the second time I've ridden this bike (medium frame, I'm 5'2" with 30" inseam). The first time was up at Whistler and I absolutely loved it on the DH. This time I took it up to Seymour Mtn. also in B.C. and rode it on Ned's, CBC, Corkscrew, Pingu, Pangor for some FR. I had good time on it except they had swapped out the nice Fox Van 36 for a Domain 318 fork and it made for a bit of a harsh ride. I think most girls (me included) who would be interested in the bike, would want a plusher, more sensitive fork.

I was curious to see how the steering would be on a slower, technical trail with lots of rocks to potentially deflect the tire. I had a pretty good rise on the stem to keep the bars from contacting my knees and I could feel the front trying to flop on me a couple times but it didn't take much muscle to keep it straight. Toward the end of the ride though, after about 6 hours of riding, I was having a lot more trouble keeping the tire aimed in the right direction. I know a taller/plusher fork may exaggerate flop, but a plusher fork would not have caused as much fatigue as the Domain did. Also, I don't think a more sensitive fork would slack out the head angle too much if you figure on a little sag.

I really like the geometry of the bike, it fits very well and feels very balanced. I felt like I had very good control coming down steep, tight turns even in the choppy stuff. I was very excited to put it to the test on the ladders bridges and log skinnies. It performed just as I had hoped it would. It was small and light enough that I felt confident to try some stuff I would not have on my big bike. I gave it the other important test, bailing off a bridge when I stalled out. Felt good being able to eject from the bike safely due to the low stand over and light weight. I was also able to bunny hop the bike off of a skinny when I felt things were going bad. The light front didn't drop on me and I felt in control.

So I finally got to pedal the bike a bit too. It was sooo nice to have a light, quick bike with a good pedaling platform. I was able to sprint it up some hills and sit and pedal comfortably for long flat distances. Most impressive for pedaling was the fact that I was over the pedals, not behind and pushing the pedals forward. Thanks to the short cockpit I'm positioned where I feel I should be. Pedaling was smooth with a very good pedaling platform.

On Sunday I rode locally in Bellingham to find some urban obstacles to conquer. I had the 36 put back on for Sunday and I liked that much better. Found a few small drops at an Elementary school as well as some timbers and stairs to ride. The Siren handled the drops to flat very well. I wasn't coming close to using the full travel in either the front or rear and the landings were very cushy. Stairs were no problem and the timbers were great for practicing balance. Again, the bike was so easy to maneuver and bail off that it really inspired my confidence.

I did notice the rear end slide out a little when the rear brake locked up on the trail (not used to the Juicy brakes!) and I think partially because the bike doesn't carry much weight in the rear. However, this lightness in the rear actually came in handy when some kids at the 7-eleven where ogling the bike and asked if I could do stoppies. I figured I had to give it a try and what do you know? The rear end popped up nice as you please! On the same note, the front is nice and light and easy enough to lift with a little pre-load and pedal on flat ground. I think most gals are going to find this bike a lot easier to handle than the average "mens" bike.

Important pros of this bike; compact (gotta watch the bars and knees though), light weight, low stand over, maneuverable, easy to lift front and rear, balanced, strong, and confidence inspiring!
 

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Good ride reports, you really gave it a good variety of riding and some tough stuff, too, especially the drops at Whistler. I'll be curious how it holds up over the long run but it sounds like a pretty fun bike for smaller folks where you can still hammer on it! :)

By the way, I'm Julie's friend and really wish I could have joined you guys on Seymour!!
 
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