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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
As the title states, I'm new to tubeless tire setups.

I have converted my bike to tubeless.

Front tire was tubed, I broke one side of the bead, removed the tube, added sealant, aired it up to 25 psi, pop-pop, rode it for a while, and it seemed to seal.

Rear tire was new. I aired it up dry to seat the bead, broke one side of the bead, added sealant, aired it up to 25 psi.

The rear tire didn't do as much pop-pop, if any at all. The bead looks seated evenly all the way around and I have no reason to believe it's not seated. Should I be concerned?

Even after a few rides, the front has dropped from 25 psi to less than 15 psi over a week of sitting. Is this to be expected - just check it before each ride anyway - or should I be expecting a better seal? I don't see any sealant residue anywhere around the tire or rim.

Also, how does the sealant not clog the stem when you air it down?

Thanks.
 

· Class Clown
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Some air loss is expected with the tire just sitting. I would take the wheel off and shake it good, hold it horizontal, flip the tire, etc. and try to get the sealant everywhere. Don't rely on just spinning the wheel.
 

· EAT MORE GRIME
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if you converted to tubeless as described, how do you know the rim tape is complete and holding
back properly ? if you cannot resolve pressure loss (a little pressure loss is normal in many setups)
then remove tire and examine the rim tape if rim has spoke holes that need to be covered.

sealant sometimes does clog the valve, you can use a stripped down q-tip and remove
the core and clean out residue, or just have replacement valves laying around to use
 
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if you converted to tubeless as described, how do you know the rim tape is complete and holding
back properly ?
I was thinking the same thing. Do you know what the rim is taped with or did you just roll with whatever is there, in which case that could be your problem.

Also as hammersorethumb said, if you want to be positive you are fully seating the bead, just go high with your pressure (within reason) initially. Air is what forces the sealant where it needs to go anyways, so I have always assumed (though I have no idea if I am correct) that an initial higher PSI helps with that as well.
 

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Put some soapy water on the spoke nipples and if you have leaking there, the tape isn't holding. And sealant won't really cure that. I do lose a few lbs a week (air - not weight - I wish) even with no obvious leaks, but 25 to 15 sounds like a little too much loss to not have a good leak somewhere.
 

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If the bead looks to be properly seated, it probably is. If the tape is against the bead lock, perhaps it is not sealing.

Not all of my tires make make much of a popping sound. I've never really heard a pop that would scare me, or startle me.
 

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I keep a spray bottle with water and a bit of dish soap that I spray the beads with before inflating. It lubricates them and makes them seat easier. Depending on the rim tire combo, beads can seat from 10psi with no pops, to those that make you pucker as they do their last pop at 40psi.
 

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I keep a spray bottle with water and a bit of dish soap that I spray the beads with before inflating. It lubricates them and makes them seat easier. Depending on the rim tire combo, beads can seat from 10psi with no pops, to those that make you pucker as they do their last pop at 40psi.
I have mounted Maxxis, Vittoria and Specialized tires. I only have a hand pump (floor pump) that I purchased about 12 years ago.
I just broke the bead on one side a week ago to add sealant. I can inflate and seat the bead with one hand using the floor pump. That tire of course is softer due to being old, but I can usually inflate a tire with a floor pump at low PSI. Plus the tire was used and had sealing already so the bed was already sort of slick too.

I've demonstrated the break down and reinstallation of a Maxxis Rekon 2.8" x27.5 in about 6 minutes start to finish (no sealant). Meaning it is very easy to seat and inflate with a hand pump. I started with a tire without air which would simulate a flat tire. Not to say this is a timed flat repair trail side, but only to say how easy it has been for me to seat the beads. I've been lucky that my tires and rim combination work well. I know not all are this easy.
 

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Rim was pre taped for tubeless. It could be leaking and I will take a look. Guess I thought that's why we put sealant in, in case of small leaks.

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How long have you used it before going tubeless? Tape isn't forever...it does wear out over time. Also some pre tape jobs seem to be better than others.

I just went tubeless...no leaks and no air loss after a week and about 50 miles of riding. Sounds like there is a leak in there somewhere.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
How long have you used it before going tubeless? Tape isn't forever...it does wear out over time. Also some pre tape jobs seem to be better than others.

I just went tubeless...no leaks and no air loss after a week and about 50 miles of riding. Sounds like there is a leak in there somewhere.
Just a couple of weeks.

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That sounds not to far away from typical, in my experience. On one set of TR Maxxis tyres, I had to thin the sealant down about 25% (water based) to get them to hold air satisfactorily, over the period of a week. They were quite good after that. Oddly enough, the best tyres for holding air I've tried running tubeless, are an older set of wire bead tube type Maxxis Crossmarks. Have to use an air canon to seat the beads, a hand pump won't do it, then add sealant through the valve cores, but they seem to hold air really really well.
 

· Disgruntled Peccary
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Going from 25 to 15psi in over a week is completely normal, especially on a new tubeless setup. I ride nearly everyday and check my pressure before each ride.
Agreed, I set up a new wheel set this week.. It was down about 7psi before the first ride, in about 5 days.
 

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I find that rotating a wheel on its side after adding sealant and inflating to be helpful in getting tubeless setups to hold air better. Doing that gets sealant between the tire bead and rim to help stop up any leaks. Here's some other things that I've found to be useful in setting up tubeless tires:

 

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I find that rotating a wheel on its side after adding sealant and inflating to be helpful in getting tubeless setups to hold air better. Doing that gets sealant between the tire bead and rim to help stop up any leaks. Here's some other things that I've found to be useful in setting up tubeless tires:

The best thing to do that I've found, is just go for a ride as soon as you install the sealant. Give the wheel/s a spin before you install them back in the frame, pump them up to about 40psi, and straight away go for a 20-30 minute ride. Not fast, just cruise up and down your street, bounce over a few kerbs/gutters etc, and you're set.
 
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