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"Oldfart from Wayback"
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My new FS bike came with Maxxis Lust's. What should I carry in case of a flat ? I'm used to always having a pump and spare tube on hand, but what do I need to carry for my tubeless?
 

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Old man on a bike
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A tube. It's the best backup if you can't fix whatever caused your flat.
 

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Same things. Remove the valve stem from the rim and install the tube to get you home.

Practice removing the tire at home so you know how to do it.
 

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onbelaydave said:
My new FS bike came with Maxxis Lust's. What should I carry in case of a flat ? I'm used to always having a pump and spare tube on hand, but what do I need to carry for my tubeless?
Several ways to go:

Minimalist: Superglue and a pump. This will take care of thorn holes and minor punctures, leave tire on rim, wet area, apply superglue, wait 3 minutes, pump it up, spit on it to make sure its sealed, if bubbles appear reapply.

Equipped: Minimalist kit plus a spare tube(s) for the sidewall tears or gashes.

Well Equipped: Equipped kit plus patch kit, 2 oz. of Tubeless Slime or Stans goop, and CO2 big air can. For if you want to do some serious trail side repairs.
 

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Wow.

dulyebr said:
haven't had a single flat in 3 years of running UST tires. I don't bring anything anymore.
I had a flat 1/4 of a mile into my first ride w/ Tubeless; never really warmed up to them and finally sold them. My friends w/ Tubeless tires get flats at about half the rate I do; perhaps 3-4 times a year?

My friends definitely like their setups.

Dave
 

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MightySchmoePong said:
I had a flat 1/4 of a mile into my first ride w/ Tubeless; never really warmed up to them and finally sold them. My friends w/ Tubeless tires get flats at about half the rate I do; perhaps 3-4 times a year?

Dave
Are these flat from sidewall tears? If they're punctures, they must be really huge for the UST tire to go flat right away. I have lots of small punctures, but it's not a big deal, I just top-off before I ride each time - no sweat.

You can add a scoop of Stans to the UST tires if you have a lot of piecrcing plants on your trails e.g. goatheads.

If the flats are from sidewall tears, look into getting a UST tire with thicker sidewalls. Some of the lite version of UST tires are light due to thinner side walls. The Maxxis LUST version and the Continental Protection series are supposed to be very tough.

Overall UST is really great if you don't mind a little extra weight and expense.
 

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I have

dulyebr said:
haven't had a single flat in 3 years of running UST tires. I don't bring anything anymore.
So I bring a tube and a pump. That didn't prevent me from walking home a couple occasions, having flatted midway into my ride. Not a 1/4 mile into it. Not a 1/2 mile from the end, no. More like a 7-mile walk. Sweet. Once the tube had a hole in it, the other time I couldn't get a hang of the CO2 device... That's what happens when you're dumb and ride too much :D

I've had many other punctures where I didn't need to walk back home, thankfully. I'm not talking sidewall rips (never had any) or thorn holes (after a couple months riding my tires look like swiss cheese when wet) either.

Pump it is now, and I've even added a little glueless patch kit, in case... Walking home in sub-freezing temps is no fun.

Maurice
 

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Had my first flat after 9 months, I had brand new Maxxis UST Highrollers 2.35 and 2 scoops of Stan's in rocky desert terrain. I was suprised and very disappointed the relatively small rock puncture on the tread was not sealed though by the Stans. Now I'm gonna carry a tube and pump. I just read in MTB Action a shop was using 50/50 Stans/Slime to "seal bigger punctures". Can anyone back this up as better? I'm going to try it anyway next weekend (with the lighter weight UST Negevals) an see.
 

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Puntures/pinch flats and sidewall tears

dulyebr said:
Are these flat from sidewall tears? If they're punctures, they must be really huge for the UST tire to go flat right away. I have lots of small punctures, but it's not a big deal, I just top-off before I ride each time - no sweat.

You can add a scoop of Stans to the UST tires if you have a lot of piecrcing plants on your trails e.g. goatheads.

If the flats are from sidewall tears, look into getting a UST tire with thicker sidewalls. Some of the lite version of UST tires are light due to thinner side walls. The Maxxis LUST version and the Continental Protection series are supposed to be very tough.

Overall UST is really great if you don't mind a little extra weight and expense.
We ride in a _ton_ of really nasty rocks. I'd image a tubeless w/ slime/stans would do really well w/ goatheads. When I was in NM I always had to have slimed tubes.

I think my first flat was a bit of a fluke; I got a bit of twig ( 1/4 inch?) jammed straight through the tread. The hole was too big to seal.

Dave
 

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A bit more general: kevlar

What do you guys think of tires with kevlar? I have a pari of Nokian with kevlar, and hadn't had a puncture ever, with them. I have ridden them all over the place, including asphalt on a sunday morning in Helsinki center (means: full of broken beer bottles) - no problem. If these tires go to hell one day, I know I'm gonna buy the same brand and type.

(I am not sure if anyone makes kevlar-enforced tubeless tires.)
 

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This is what Mavic suggests..

Carry a pump and;

REPAIRING UST TYRES
A. Repairing punctures (smaller than 4mm cuts)
1. Don t remove the tyre.
2. Dry the damaged area.
3. Clean it with acetone.
4. Pinch the tyre, so that the hole will open.
5. Glue the hole with cyanoacrylate glue (Loctite 4850).
6. Let it dry for approx. 3 minutes (keep the hole closed).
7. Inflate the tyre to the recommended pressure.

B. Repairing punctures (larger than 4mm cuts)
1. Remove the tyre.
2. Dry the damaged area.
3. Clean it with acetone.
4. Pinch the tyre so that the hole will open.
5. Glue the hole with cyanoacrylate glue (Loctite 4850).
6. Let it dry for approx. 3 minutes (keep the hole closed).
7. Remove the tyre from the rim.
8. Turn the tyre inside out.
9. Find the hole and spread a thin layer of glue on it (Loctite 4850).
10. Let the glue dry for 15 seconds.
11. Put the rubber patch to the glued area and press it for 1 minute.
12. Reinstall the tyre.
13. Inflate the tyre to the recommended pressure.
 

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theProfessor said:
Carry a pump and;

REPAIRING UST TYRES
A. Repairing punctures (smaller than 4mm cuts)
1. Don t remove the tyre.
2. Dry the damaged area.
3. Clean it with acetone.
4. Pinch the tyre, so that the hole will open.
5. Glue the hole with cyanoacrylate glue (Loctite 4850).
6. Let it dry for approx. 3 minutes (keep the hole closed).
7. Inflate the tyre to the recommended pressure.

B. Repairing punctures (larger than 4mm cuts)
1. Remove the tyre.
2. Dry the damaged area.
3. Clean it with acetone.
4. Pinch the tyre so that the hole will open.
5. Glue the hole with cyanoacrylate glue (Loctite 4850).
6. Let it dry for approx. 3 minutes (keep the hole closed).
7. Remove the tyre from the rim.
8. Turn the tyre inside out.
9. Find the hole and spread a thin layer of glue on it (Loctite 4850).
10. Let the glue dry for 15 seconds.
11. Put the rubber patch to the glued area and press it for 1 minute.
12. Reinstall the tyre.
13. Inflate the tyre to the recommended pressure.
I know no one that carries acetone on a ride.

Just take a tube, a tire boot and a pump to finish the ride and do the repair at home.
 

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Well, that wouldn't be hard

For what its worth, I don't carry anyting, use no sealer, and trust the tires.. for now..
--
But I am going to start carrying the Locktite and a very tiny bottle of Acetone.. (those ones they use for crack)

I am pretty sure you could use one of those Alcohol wipes in an emergency instead.. its just for cleaning anyway..and I carry those for scratches and stuff..

The point of UST is less weight.. carrying a tube can run over 2lbs apiece
And, what if you pinch more than one tire..?? (been there done that) Better carry two tubes..

With smaller tires, I used to carry tubes and a spare folding tire... but my bike only weighed 25lbs, and the tires about 1.5lbs

Thats not practical with a 2.5 UST tire, even though it is folding...
 

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theProfessor said:
For what its worth, I don't carry anyting, use no sealer, and trust the tires.. for now..
I do exactly the same here,trust and hope.I havent head a flat on any of my bikes in near a half a decade.I ride near 100 miles a week,on all sorts of terrain.
 

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cyanoacrylate is ca. glue or super glue.

REPAIRING UST TYRES
A. Repairing punctures (smaller than 4mm cuts)
1. Don t remove the tyre.
2. Dry the damaged area.
3. Clean it with acetone.
4. Pinch the tyre, so that the hole will open.
5. Glue the hole with cyanoacrylate glue (Loctite 4850).
6. Let it dry for approx. 3 minutes (keep the hole closed).
7. Inflate the tyre to the recommended pressure.

B. Repairing punctures (larger than 4mm cuts)
1. Remove the tyre.
2. Dry the damaged area.
3. Clean it with acetone.
4. Pinch the tyre so that the hole will open.
5. Glue the hole with cyanoacrylate glue (Loctite 4850).
6. Let it dry for approx. 3 minutes (keep the hole closed).
7. Remove the tyre from the rim.
8. Turn the tyre inside out.
9. Find the hole and spread a thin layer of glue on it (Loctite 4850).
10. Let the glue dry for 15 seconds.
11. Put the rubber patch to the glued area and press it for 1 minute.
12. Reinstall the tyre.
13. Inflate the tyre to the recommended pressure.
 
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