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Just saw some pictures in Dirt Rag of a Sultan with rear the derailleur cable passing through the rear triangle upright member. I hope this is the case for current production and not just a proto. Does anyone know?
 

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fall

The change with the cable running thru the upright should be available about the time the magazine is on the news stand.

We just drilled the tube and put in some grommets.

DT
 

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turnerbikes said:
We just drilled the tube and put in some grommets.

DT
Nice! Will that change apply to other models as well?
Much cleaner looking than the cable guide above the front derailleur IMHO.

Also- Just my .02 but I'd like to see the cable guide at the driveside drop-out moved to the inside of the seatstay, 1-2" above the drop-out. This way the derailer cable and brake hose would be symmetrical in how they pass through the rear triangle. Not a big deal but it would just look cleaner, and one less exposed & cut zip-tie to slice your calf open.
 

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Bite Me.
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FM - that routing doesn't look very SRAM friendly.
 

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cutthroat said:
FM - that routing doesn't look very SRAM friendly.
Works great- I have owned bikes with this exact cable routing. :thumbsup:
If you look at it, it's really no different than the current routing, it just runs on the inside of the seatstay instead of the outside, and 1" higher to keep it clear of the casette & chain.
 

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grrrr

Since you brought up zip ties slicing body parts, I will now vent my serious concern over so many riders with no patience? to cleanly install cable ties. How tough is it to put the 'buckle' flat to the frame so that neither the buckle or the sharp end is facing up or out?? And if the first attempt puts it wrong, cut it off and use another. I am not just picking on Americans, but pics of euro riders as well. Seems that cable ties cost more than I thought or the lure of a great ride is greater than a good job of finishing off the build?
It really is a lot cleaner to use a box knife to slice off the un-used end flat to the buckle as well.

Soap box is yours.....

DT
 

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Just tell me why you DON'T want to do it.

turnerbikes said:
Soap box is yours.....

DT
:)

Sure thing. Can you please explain the logic behind running the cable on the outside of the drop-out, over the inside of the driveside chainstay to me? I really can't see any reason not to run it on the inside of the driveside chainstay. It looks cleaner, less exposed sharp edges, housing is protected from rocks crashes and such, and with a properly placed cable stop there is no interference with the drivetrain and it lines up with the derailleur fine.

Probably a little harder to fabricate, I suppose the stop might have to be welded on earlier in the process of tacking the rear tri together.
 

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cable angle

Most riders will be using SRAM or Shadow, with the cable coming in from the front, the inside line you sketched would be too high for these popular models, unless the cable guide was placed a lot lower, mirroring the outside placement, then it would be very close to the chain and would have to go around the dropout which, then drop down. If you look at SRAM and Shadow their cable ports point away from the bike, not parallel as well as forward. I assure you that whatever way I route it someone will not like it.

DT
 

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Hey Dave, Thanks for the reply. Always stoked that you take the time to respond.

Here are some pictures I shot last night of my buddies Knolly Endorphin. Cable routing looks perfect to me! He's running shimano shadow, but I haven't seen/heard any complaints from Sram riding knolly owners. Totally dig how the der. and brake routing is symetrical, protected from rocks/branches/legs, and looks clean. The bike I previously owned with similar routing was a santa cruz, the cable ran closer to the casette, worked great as well but probably not SRAM friendly.

Seems like the trick to making it SRAM friendly is having the cable stop up high enough and horizontal, not angled down towards the derailer.

turnerbikes said:
I assure you that whatever way I route it someone will not like it.

DT
I feel your pain on that one;)
Just keep making killer bikes though. Improved cable routing will only encourage me to make the leap to a DW turner.
 

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turnerbikes said:
Since you brought up zip ties slicing body parts, I will now vent my serious concern over so many riders with no patience? to cleanly install cable ties. How tough is it to put the 'buckle' flat to the frame so that neither the buckle or the sharp end is facing up or out?? And if the first attempt puts it wrong, cut it off and use another. I am not just picking on Americans, but pics of euro riders as well. Seems that cable ties cost more than I thought or the lure of a great ride is greater than a good job of finishing off the build?
It really is a lot cleaner to use a box knife to slice off the un-used end flat to the buckle as well.

Soap box is yours.....

DT
Or............
Folks could stop cutting the spare ends of zip-ties. If you simply grab the excess portion of the tie with a pair of blunt nose pliers flush with the buckle and twist until it breaks (usually ~3 rotations), you'll be left with a nice, snag free installation. Then it won't matter which way the buckle is pointed because there is no sharp edge.
 

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You can also use a pair of fingernail clippers and nip the end of the zip tie off flush with the buckle with out any sharp edges.

"I assure you that whatever way I route it someone will not like it" Ain't that the truth!! Someone always has a better way to do things...wheather they're right or wrong!

happy trails...

squish
 

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another method

grab tail of zip tie with pliers or needle nose as close to buckle as possible. Twist the tail with pliers about 5-6 turns till it breaks off. Usually, the tail will break off below the buckle and will not leave a sharp edge.
 

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FM said:
I really can't see any reason not to run it on the inside of the driveside chainstay. It looks cleaner, less exposed sharp edges, housing is protected from rocks crashes and such, and with a properly placed cable stop there is no interference with the drivetrain and it lines up with the derailleur fine.
+1 on this one.

I do see your point as well Mr. Turner, but to me this looks like an improvement.
 
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