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Even thou you loosing a bit of braking traction on steep trails (compared to HD or MM), in dry conditions its really fast and fun rear tire with plenty grip in corners, even in bikeparks.
The only time i had problems with it was in wet and muddy conditions...
 

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Compared to the E-Agarro, the RR seems to have a bit better hook up when leaned, and a bit less on slippery climbs and steep braking descents. The loss of climbing traction bothered me at first but I don't notice much anymore, but it has cost me a handful of slippery/ loose/ steep climbs that I otherwise would have made but instead spun out and had to walk. The key is to use the low rolling resistance of the RR to keep up lots of momentum to make certain you clear everything. The RR has a grippier compound but less aggressive knobs where-as the E-Agarro has less grippy compound but more aggressive knobs. On hard pack the more grippy compound will climb better. On shake the more aggressive knobs will dig in and climb better.

The RR is a sweeter feeling tire in that it's better damped and less 'pingy' feeling off rocks and what not. The E-Agarro was definitely less well damped than the standard Agarro. I suspect that the only difference between the Agarro vs. the E-Agarro is that the E-Agarro gets harder rubber to extend E-bike battery life and tire life.

The RR is a bit more in that sweet spot size wise for a rear 29er at an actual 2.35" where the Agarro was about 2.28". It doesn't sound like much but it's a lot of volume difference.

I didn't have any reliability issues with the E-Agarro (I always run tire inserts) but literally the threads are coming through the sidewalls on those things with some use and they feel very thin, and the RR feels more substantial.

Weight wise the RR was about 1005 grams, I seem to recall the E-Agarro being about 950 grams. Not enough to matter and frankly for only a 55 gram penalty, the RR sidewalls feel a lot more substantial so a good trade off.

Rolling resistance, the E-Agarro was darn good. The RR is better however with even lower rolling resistance. I could tell right away.

The E-Agarro is a rounded tire which I like where-as the RR is a flatish tire due to the shaved knobs and a 28mm rim ID. As long as one of my tires, front or rear has a rounded profile, I feel like my bike initiates turns just fine. But when both tires are flat, the bike feels like a bit of a pig not wanting to turn for me. I stuck a rather flat Martello 2.6 up front recently (an old favorite) and in combination with the RR the bike felt hard to lean over so I removed it after one ride.

The E-Agarros wore well for me and also importantly still had pretty good traction when getting shagged. Mostly I'd notice a loss of climbing traction when the knob edges rounded. Not enough time on the RR's to comment on wear but they are doing well and much better than the old Snakeskin ones.

The Rock Razor is my new dry/ hot weather tire but I might run the standard Agarro or the Hans Dampf2 during the winter season. I REALLY wish they offered the newest HD2 in the 2.35 Speed/ Grip compound, but they don't.

Hope that helps.
Thanks for the detailed comparison, looking for something different to try on a new Trance X Advanced build I'm doing and I'm thinking the E-Agarro might be the better option since most of the riding for that bike it's going to be in Phoenix like South Mountain so really loose stuff over hard and you don't really get to keep momentum on the climbs there since a lot of them are ledges or big rocks to go over. Sedona would be another place for that bike but nothing too crazy, primarily a true trail bike since I'm building an Enduro S-Works for bigger stuff and park.
I haven't had good luck with short center knobs here so far, they seem to break loose really easy on the climbs like big rock slabs covered in that kitty litter like dirt we have here, how do you think the RR would do in that stuff? Also since you have a lot of experience with Vittoria, is there a big difference between regular Agarro and E-Agarro? Grip wise and feel? Thanks for your time
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
It's not a huge difference between the Agarro & the E version.
If I were to try to give you objective measurements I'd say the E has 10% less traction but also 15% less rolling resistance.

Sent from my SM-G715A using Tapatalk
 

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It's not a huge difference between the Agarro & the E version.
If I were to try to give you objective measurements I'd say the E has 10% less traction but also 15% less rolling resistance.

Sent from my SM-G715A using Tapatalk
Oh ok, good to know. Was the ride better on the regular Agarro vs E-Agarro or just as pingy like you mentioned before?
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
The standard Agarro definitely rides better than the E version. More damped.

Sent from my SM-G715A using Tapatalk
 

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The standard Agarro definitely rides better than the E version. More damped.

Sent from my SM-G715A using Tapatalk
Perfect, thanks for the info. I'll try the E-Agarro first and see what I think. As soon as you are allowed to say anything about the front you are testing please let me know, I'll definitely be interested to try them
 

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Compared to the E-Agarro, the RR seems to have a bit better hook up when leaned, and a bit less on slippery climbs and steep braking descents. The loss of climbing traction bothered me at first but I don't notice much anymore, but it has cost me a handful of slippery/ loose/ steep climbs that I otherwise would have made but instead spun out and had to walk. The key is to use the low rolling resistance of the RR to keep up lots of momentum to make certain you clear everything. The RR has a grippier compound but less aggressive knobs where-as the E-Agarro has less grippy compound but more aggressive knobs. On hard pack the more grippy compound will climb better. On shake the more aggressive knobs will dig in and climb better.

The RR is a sweeter feeling tire in that it's better damped and less 'pingy' feeling off rocks and what not. The E-Agarro was definitely less well damped than the standard Agarro. I suspect that the only difference between the Agarro vs. the E-Agarro is that the E-Agarro gets harder rubber to extend E-bike battery life and tire life.

The RR is a bit more in that sweet spot size wise for a rear 29er at an actual 2.35" where the Agarro was about 2.28". It doesn't sound like much but it's a lot of volume difference.

I didn't have any reliability issues with the E-Agarro (I always run tire inserts) but literally the threads are coming through the sidewalls on those things with some use and they feel very thin, and the RR feels more substantial.

Weight wise the RR was about 1005 grams, I seem to recall the E-Agarro being about 950 grams. Not enough to matter and frankly for only a 55 gram penalty, the RR sidewalls feel a lot more substantial so a good trade off.

Rolling resistance, the E-Agarro was darn good. The RR is better however with even lower rolling resistance. I could tell right away.

The E-Agarro is a rounded tire which I like where-as the RR is a flatish tire due to the shaved knobs and a 28mm rim ID. As long as one of my tires, front or rear has a rounded profile, I feel like my bike initiates turns just fine. But when both tires are flat, the bike feels like a bit of a pig not wanting to turn for me. I stuck a rather flat Martello 2.6 up front recently (an old favorite) and in combination with the RR the bike felt hard to lean over so I removed it after one ride.

The E-Agarros wore well for me and also importantly still had pretty good traction when getting shagged. Mostly I'd notice a loss of climbing traction when the knob edges rounded. Not enough time on the RR's to comment on wear but they are doing well and much better than the old Snakeskin ones.

The Rock Razor is my new dry/ hot weather tire but I might run the standard Agarro or the Hans Dampf2 during the winter season. I REALLY wish they offered the newest HD2 in the 2.35 Speed/ Grip compound, but they don't.

Hope that helps.
Could you please comment on the HD2 rolling resistance compared to the RR. I just got a new HD2 in super trail casing, but I am starting to think that for mostly dusty with a bit if loose over hardback hardback I should have gone for a faster rolling RR to complement the Kenda Hellcat up front.
Thanks!
 

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Could you please comment on the HD2 rolling resistance compared to the RR. I just got a new HD2 in super trail casing, but I am starting to think that for mostly dusty with a bit if loose over hardback hardback I should have gone for a faster rolling RR to complement the Kenda Hellcat up front.
Thanks!
Both of them are great rear tires for dry conditions.
If you want faster tire, but dont mind having less braking power in the back and like drifting in corners till the side knobs start grabbing - get the RR, vs more traction, grip and braking power (but still can drift), that also works in the wet - keep the HD.
 

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Could you please comment on the HD2 rolling resistance compared to the RR. I just got a new HD2 in super trail casing, but I am starting to think that for mostly dusty with a bit if loose over hardback hardback I should have gone for a faster rolling RR to complement the Kenda Hellcat up front.
Thanks!
Have run both on dry dusty loose over hard trails and both are great.

As per Muddy-runs' post, I had the same experience.

Rolling resistance wise, I pretty much couldn't tell any difference between the two.

Sent from my INE-LX2 using Tapatalk
 

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Evolutionsverlierer
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Thank you for taking the time and posting this op.

Just out of curiosity, what dropper do you have and what broke?
 

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Thanks guys! How does the HD2 compare to the agarro in terms of rolling resistance for anyone that has run it? Just trying to get a feel for how much faster tyres can actually run. I read a fair bit that the HD2 was quite a fast tyre, but curious to how it stacks up against well acknowledged fast tyres.

Interesting you say that the HD2 was close to the same as the RR!
 

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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
Perfect, thanks for the info. I'll try the E-Agarro first and see what I think. As soon as you are allowed to say anything about the front you are testing please let me know, I'll definitely be interested to try them
I have a new in the package E-Agarro I'd sell btw.

Sent from my SM-G715A using Tapatalk
 

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Somehow, even though I'm no Pro at all, I've managed to talk myself in to some free tires here and there. I've been testing a couple of different prototype front tires. I guess I'm on my 4th one in the last year or so.

The most recent versions are by a wide margin my favorite front tire, yet I was asked not to post about them. What I can say is that they have Assagai like traction, but roll MUCH faster. They are also properly sized at an actual 2.48" wide, light at just under about 1K grams. They also continue to perform very well even when they are quite ragged looking.

Not sure what I'll do if I lose my hookup on these. :(
Teasing us!
 

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Evolutionsverlierer
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My Wolf tooth remote broke actually. No issues with my KS droppers.

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Bugger and crap, all 3 droppers in my stable have wolftooth remotes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #36 ·
I do really like the Rock Razor as an aggressive hardpack trail tire but it has some minor limitations as a trade off for the very low rolling resistance.

Just ordered the new Pirelli Scorpion Enduro R tire to test as a rear. It seems quite similar to the Rock Razor but with the added benefit of slightly taller center knobs. Hoping this bridges the gap. Plus trying different tires is fun.
 

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always licking the glass
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While not on the RR, I’m a convert from Maxxis over to Schwalbe thanks to recommendations from two friends.

Both bikes are running SuperTrail Magic Mary 2.6 on the front. I came from running DHSs and Assagai’s on the front, and the Marys seem to be much faster and have better grip. The cornering feels sooo much nicer.

On the rear I’m running Nobby Nics 2.6s. I couldn’t find a good maxxis tire for the rear I like. Makes a great rear tire (blue stripe forgot what its called), and for the summer on the big bike, I’m going to roll Marys front and rear for park riding. I didn’t like the betty (too slow) or the HD, but these two tires feel like a good combo to me.

What I really like about the Schwalbe tires is the casing is solid front and rear, and it makes the bike feel better overall. I don’t feel the need to run lower pressures to make the bike not feel harsh. I had to do this constantly with maxxis, and now that’s not a problem anymore :)
 

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I just ordered the tire yesterday and it'll probably be about six weeks before it's installed.

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Look forward to hearing feedback! Do you have any experience on the Hans Dampf in the new super trail? How's is compared to the RR if you do?
 
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