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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm thinking of chaging my position slightly so that I'm not quite as stretched out. I have a cannondale F4 that is 100% stock.
I'd like to get some riser bars to bring my hands up a bit. Can I also get a shorter stem for my bike? I'm new, so looking at it< I'm not sure the stem can even be replaced???

Any particular recommendations for high rise bars or stems? I'd like to keep them lighter or at least as light as stock.

Also, any pictures of set-ups similar to what I am looking to do would be great.

Thanks
 

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yeah you can easily swap your stem out for something else. maybe stop by your local bike shop, they might be able to lend you a different stem/bar so you play around with different setups before you buy anything.

try eastons EA70 Monkeylite bars, they come in a varitey of sizes and are pretty light.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the info Invicta, I'll look into monkey bars.


My local shop suggested truvativ bars/stems. I'm looking a their site and trying to get an idea of which way to go.

My stock bars are 20 mm rise. Stem is 5 degrees and 120mm length.

Since i want to not lose any height but yet get closer to me I would need to get a stem that is a higher degree angle but yet shorter, right?
So, for example, they have a stem that is a 10 degree rise and is available in lengths of 80, 90, 100, etc.) So, if I got the stem in a 90mm length, I would only be 30 mm shorter but I should be higher because of the angle, right?
 

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The steep angle will raise the bars, the shorter stem will will obviously keep you from stretching as much. 30 mm may not sound like much as it's only just over an inch but its a huge difference in the world of bikes. Give the stem a shot, you may decide you dont need the bars.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
thanks for the info.

So, how hard is it to swap the stem out? I have a 2008 cannondale F4

Also, does anyone think that it will create any issues (like my brake /gear cables)?


And does anyone know where to get truvativ stuff for a good price?
 

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The stem is easy to swap, but not so easy to explain over the internet.

Maybe try the Park Tools site's help section. I was recently impressed with it's thorough explanation of derailleur adjusting. I bet it has a section for installation of a stem that will help you out. Removal is extremely easy... just take out all the bolt!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Wheelspeed said:
The stem is easy to swap, but not so easy to explain over the internet.

Maybe try the Park Tools site's help section. I was recently impressed with it's thorough explanation of derailleur adjusting. I bet it has a section for installation of a stem that will help you out. Removal is extremely easy... just take out all the bolt!
Thanks for the site recommendation. Didn't find anything on replacing the stem but there is alot of other informative stuff.

I'll ask in the cannondale forum in hopes someone has removed an F4 stem but if anyone else here knows some details I would love to hear.

thanks.
 

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I was going to say that this was a piece of cake, but then I looked up your bike. Nice looking bike btw. If I found the correct bike, it has a Cannondale HeadShok Super Fatty Ultra DL. Found the user guide for it here. I'm not sure, but I think this shock has a fatter than normal steerer tube, thus requiring an "abnormal" stem. Other mtbr members, please feel free to correct me.
When you buy a stem, apart from the length and angle, the clamping sizes have to be correct. Thus you have to know the clamping size required for the handlebars, 31.8 mm for the stock F4 handlebars I believe, and the clamp size for the steerer tube, 1 1/8 inch for newer mountain bikes, but possibly different for your Cannondale. If you decide to buy new handlebars, just make sure to buy the same clampsize as you already have, 31.8 mm which is the newish, by now common, oversize clamp.
As for changing the stem, once you have a correct stem in hand, it's usually not that hard. A bit harder for you since the lockout for the shock is on top of the steerer and the lever has to come off to change the stem. If I read the user manual correctly, you should be able to just unscrew the bolt that is in the middle of the lockout lever and the lever should come off. After that, you loosen the two bolts that clamp the stem to the steering tube. Then the stem should slide right up and off. Installation is the reverse, with a few caveats.

1) The bearing load must be adjusted prior to tightening the clamping screws. On a regular threadless headset, this is done by tightening the bolt in the center of the top cap. On your headshock, I'm not sure, perhaps the bolt that holds the lockout lever servers this purpose also?
2) If the stem clamp is of a different height, you may need to adjust spacers or get new ones. For a regular headset/stem, there should be about 3 mm from the top of the steerer tube to the top of the stem, so there is space to pre-load the bearings. On your headshock, again I'm not sure but suspect it's similar. If the steerer tube is not a standard 1 1/8", you'll need "abnormal" spacers.

Here is a link to Sheldon Brown's headset page. I hope this helps, sorry I can't be more specific about your particular bike. Cannondales are great bikes, but they like being a bit special. My only Cannondale is an older roadbike, so I'm not really familiar with their mountain bikes.
 
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