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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm getting new rims for my 2007 kona coiler, not sure what kind yet but I'm heavily leaning towards Transition's Revolution 32 Rims, they are relatively cheap, at least for rims anyway. I measured the rims on my bike with a micrometer and they are 31mm wide, would a 32mm rim fit? I don't see why it wouldn't but I really have no idea. Also, would i still be able to ride my hubs which are still stock, spokes? Could i install them myself, im pretty sure i have all the tools to do it, unless you need specialized bike tools. Help!? :eekster:
 

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1mm isn't going to make any difference
wheels are not as simple as putting it all together, if you have a rear cassette you'll need to dish the rear wheel, all the spokes have to be tensioned and the wheel has to be true and round.

that said , if you have the time and patience, and the skill you can do it

or you can just buy something already made
why are you replacing the existing
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
dan0 said:
why are you replacing the existing
Well the back rim is slightly bend from coming up short on a jump, I've also wanted new rims for awhile because i don't really think that they are very tough (that part already proved :rolleyes: ). Yea the real concern I have are the spokes, I have the time and patience, but lack the skill so I'll probably take them to a shop for that part. That being said i can probably take all the spokes off at home, that shouldn't be too hard.
 

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ajd245246 said:
I have the time and patience, but lack the skill so I'll probably take them to a shop.
None of us are born with wheelbuilding skills and your "time and patience" are major pre-requisites for gaining such skills. Read the info in my sig - specially designed for people like you - and make sure you read the links at the end. Make sure you click the Wheelpro one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Mike T. said:
None of us are born with wheelbuilding skills and your "time and patience" are major pre-requisites for gaining such skills. Read the info in my sig - specially designed for people like you - and make sure you read the links at the end. Make sure you click the Wheelpro one.
Wow great information there, I'll be sure to read through there and maybe save some money, thanks!
 

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ajd245246 said:
Well the back rim is slightly bend from coming up short on a jump, I've also wanted new rims for awhile because i don't really think that they are very tough (that part already proved :rolleyes: ). Yea the real concern I have are the spokes, I have the time and patience, but lack the skill so I'll probably take them to a shop for that part. That being said i can probably take all the spokes off at home, that shouldn't be too hard.
if all youre saving is the hub then just get a wire cutter and clip them off
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
dan0 said:
if all youre saving is the hub then just get a wire cutter and clip them off
well i'd like to save the spokes if possible, but if i can't that's what i'll do.
 

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Don't reuse the spokes on a 2-3 year old bike. ESPECIALLY if you've already encountered noticeable wear (out of true wheel after jump).

No shop would rebuild your wheels with old spokes. The reason is, there's no way to guarantee how long they'll last, and there is every reason to believe that whatever the specific time is, it won't be all that long.

However, carefully removing the spokes one at a time might be a good way for you to learn about spoke lacing, plus you can practice using your new spoke wrench - you might even try just truing your current wheels before you try to build new ones.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
PlasticBike said:
Don't reuse the spokes on a 2-3 year old bike. ESPECIALLY if you've already encountered noticeable wear (out of true wheel after jump).

No shop would rebuild your wheels with old spokes. The reason is, there's no way to guarantee how long they'll last, and there is every reason to believe that whatever the specific time is, it won't be all that long.

However, carefully removing the spokes one at a time might be a good way for you to learn about spoke lacing, plus you can practice using your new spoke wrench - you might even try just truing your current wheels before you try to build new ones.
There's deffinitely more to this than I previously thought.....
 

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Definitely more to it, but if you take your time and make use of the info available here, it's all very doable. The key is to do any work on your bike (especially at first) when you won't be riding for a while. This way you won't be so sorely tempted to rush it and make a mess of things. And, should things head south, you'll also have time to take it into the shop.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
PlasticBike said:
Definitely more to it, but if you take your time and make use of the info available here, it's all very doable. The key is to do any work on your bike (especially at first) when you won't be riding for a while. This way you won't be so sorely tempted to rush it and make a mess of things. And, should things head south, you'll also have time to take it into the shop.
And what a time to start, the weather has been crap by me for the last 2 weeks.
 
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