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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello All, I'm brand new to any sort of biking (probably rode a bicycle 2x in the last 20 years) but I'm tired of growing fat and lazy! I'm 41 yrs old, 5'10", 205 lbs, relatively new to Northern California having moved from Phx, AZ, and can no longer stand not being out in nature and exploring.

After weeks of lurking here and researching every hardtail imaginable since I really didn't want to spend over $500 for something I have no idea I'll stick with, I rashly bought a used 2018 Diamondback Recoil 29er this past weekend. I had spoken to a couple aquaintances who both said to go full suspension, so that was rattling in my brain, and I saw an ad for a FS lower than what I would spend on a new hardtail (or any used ones I'd seen locally), so I jumped in!

Only later did I get to research the Recoil and find out it's not very recommended. But, at least now I have a bike, and I think it'll be fine for my purposes, which is just getting me out in the wild on some flat easy winding trails, maybe under some redwood trees, building my endurance and shedding a few pounds.

It's totally unlike me to buy something without putting hours of research into it, so I'm kind of freaking out and can't believe I didn't ask more questions, inspect it more closely, etc. I'll get over it, but has anyone else felt this way? Did I completely screw up?
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
As an example of how over my head I am, I went to check tire pressures today and realized I've never used a Presta valve before! Back to YouTube - learned you have to unscrew the little devil - then unscrewed the wrong part and found a little bit of green goop bubbling out - ARE THESE TIRES TUBELESS?!

The seller didn't mention that at all, and I didn't ask, and I've searched every inch of sidewall on both tires and see no mention of tubeless or even "tubeless ready" on the rims. I haven't checked the back tire yet. As far as I've learned so far, the only way to know for sure is to break the seal, and I'm far too lacking in knowledge to attempt that unless I absolutely have to. Front tire is Kenda Honeybadger; rear tire is Specialized Ground Control; both 29ers.

Unless anyone here has any suggestions, I'll probably just ride them and enjoy for now, as long as the front one holds the air pressure.
 

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I wouldn't sweat it. We all bought stuff like that at some point in life...

Just ride it and enjoy. If it is not adequate, buy a better bike after you get some experience.

Even with "better" bikes people end up trading up or upgrading. And as a new rider you don't know if you like more flowy trails or downhill or gravel etc. So chances are the first bike is not the right type anyway.
 

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Yeah, you are right, it's a low end bike, not the best, but it will get you out and started. The only real problem you'll run into is that the suspension isn't designed for someone your weight, most is designed for an avg of about 150-180lbs. You can crank in some pre-load on the spring on the shock and try to crank down the pre-load on the fork, but don't think it'll help too much. All that being said, honestly once you keep it to "tame" trails, you'll be find, my first bike (wasted money as I absolutely fell in love with MTBing) was a ReCoilEX in 2004, lasted 10 months before I pretty much killed all the parts, but I also put 1800 miles in on it and built some good fitness.
 

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njperry, welcome to riding! Like others have said, don't sweat it and just go ride. I think Nor Cal will give you plenty of opportunity to try different types of trail. Get in bike shape, figure out how you like to ride, and base your next bike purchase on that. MTBing is a great community. Make cool new friends, learn from them and by doing, and have fun!
 

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MTB community or even any biking community is usually pretty good. Best bet would be to find a local event aimed at beginners (group rides, some sort of fest, clinics... etc) and they're usually sponsored by a local bike shop (sharp bicycle or mikes, I just searched google) so they'll be around for you to ask questions. And if you're still unsure they can look your bike over and get you set up properly.

I'd just make sure that the shop is more focused on getting you out to ride rather than trying to up sell you on parts or a new bike.

https://mikesbikes.com/pages/free-tuesday-night-tech-clinics
 

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I'd have to say, I'm kind of jealous; just by looking at their website, I wish there's a Mike's near me.

also, if you are of the youtubing type, there are several rabbit holes to go down:

seth's bike hacks
park tools
gmbn
gmbn tech

you'll have to search through their histories (using their playlists is helpful) as a lot of their basics have already been covered long ago
 

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The good news is you can sell it without losing much if you keep it in good shape. Instead of spending on upgrades I'd save for a good next bike. By then you'll know if you'll be sticking with the sport.
 

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Most likely, the tires are not set up tubeless but have Slime filled tubes.
this is what I was thinking. Should offer a little better puncture protection than no sealant at all, but have a weight penalty.

As with anything, there's a learning curve to all of it. Especially if you want to get into the details. But the core of it isn't so complicated.

1. Get a bike (you're covered, it'll get you going).
2. Wear a helmet.
3. Ride the bike.

All the other stuff are little details that might improve the riding experience for you, or not. They might seem overwhelming, but slow down and take them one at a time.

Tire pressure would be the first one I'd do. On that, put enough air in the tires that you don't ding the rims. The exact number isn't really the important thing (it will vary depending on rider weight, tire and rim sizes/combinations, terrain, etc). Maybe a bit firmer if you're riding pavement or smooth gravel. Also make sure you put some chain lube on the chain occasionally, and use a rag to wipe off excess.

It's probably also worthwhile to take the bike to a shop for a tune to make sure you're starting off with a bike that functions as well as it can. Not everyone who's selling a bike sells it in tip-top condition (in fact, most don't). While it's there, you can ask some specific questions if you have any, and they can show you on your actual bike. I would recommend avoiding diving into too much DIY maintenance at first. Ease yourself into that as you feel comfortable taking on new tasks.
 

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Hello All, I'm brand new to any sort of biking (probably rode a bicycle 2x in the last 20 years) but I'm tired of growing fat and lazy! I'm 41 yrs old, 5'10", 205 lbs, relatively new to Northern California having moved from Phx, AZ, and can no longer stand not being out in nature and exploring.

After weeks of lurking here and researching every hardtail imaginable since I really didn't want to spend over $500 for something I have no idea I'll stick with, I rashly bought a used 2018 Diamondback Recoil 29er this past weekend. I had spoken to a couple aquaintances who both said to go full suspension, so that was rattling in my brain, and I saw an ad for a FS lower than what I would spend on a new hardtail (or any used ones I'd seen locally), so I jumped in!

Only later did I get to research the Recoil and find out it's not very recommended. But, at least now I have a bike, and I think it'll be fine for my purposes, which is just getting me out in the wild on some flat easy winding trails, maybe under some redwood trees, building my endurance and shedding a few pounds.

It's totally unlike me to buy something without putting hours of research into it, so I'm kind of freaking out and can't believe I didn't ask more questions, inspect it more closely, etc. I'll get over it, but has anyone else felt this way? Did I completely screw up?
Where in Nor Cal are you located? Link up with some people here to get your feet wet on the trails. Enjoy the outdoors.
 

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You sound like where I was 4 years ago...

Only 45lbs lighter o_0

You'll be fine on that bike for getting out there and getting started.

My first MTB (loose use of the abbreviation) was a KHS Winslow 29er.

I rode that thing like I stole it ;-)

& soon outgrew it...

If you get bit by the bug (& you will), you'll be back here hunting for your next bike in a matter of months =)

Have fun on your new stead.

PS - everyone should learn on a HT.

'Born to ride!'
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Thanks for the great connection with btceb.org - been all over their site tonight and already have a list of 3 trails that should be good to start out on. Unfortunately it's supposed to rain all weekend, but that's fine, I still need to get a helmet, gloves, and a couple other things. Not confident my front tire is holding air, so may end up taking the bike to a shop for a full go-through.

Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk
 

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Thanks for the great connection with btceb.org - been all over their site tonight and already have a list of 3 trails that should be good to start out on. Unfortunately it's supposed to rain all weekend, but that's fine, I still need to get a helmet, gloves, and a couple other things. Not confident my front tire is holding air, so may end up taking the bike to a shop for a full go-through.

Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk
since it's going to rain, you might end up hanging out and chatting it up at the bike shop for longer than you'd expect. which is a good thing.
 

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Hello All, I'm brand new to any sort of biking (probably rode a bicycle 2x in the last 20 years) but I'm tired of growing fat and lazy! I'm 41 yrs old, 5'10", 205 lbs,
I'm in the same boat like you are. I'm not fat, but I noticed whatever I put in to my mouth kinda wonts to stick to my belly :D

I wouldn't worry about if you made a mistake buying wrong bike, I would look that from other perspective. You bought a bike and now you can enjoy and while enjoying you can also get fit.

You can always trade your bike down the road for something else. Just enjoy your ride. I bought 20 years old suspension front and back bike and I don't have a clue about half the stuff on it. But, it will be a great experience to learn a lot. And I'll jump on other bike after one year maybe. You need to start some where and you already made a good start. Now just ride.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Thanks, appreciate it. Yes, that's what I figure. It'll be great to learn on and figure out what type of riding I really like most.

Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk
 
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