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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi.
I'm new to the forum (I've been "lurking" for the past few weeks).
I've been riding a hardtail since 1998 - a stumpjumper.
Decided it was time to upgrade, so I tested an '06 epic and an '06 sj.
While I liked them both, I decided on the SJ - specifically a SJ FSR Expert.
I should have it in a couple of days.

Anyway, I was wondering if anyone has any specific advice to offer about this bike.
Are there any particular maintenance items that I should watch out for on this bike?
Are there certain upgrades that are advisable - tires, etc? (I ride in NJ - some sand, some rocks, 1 to 2 ft drops)

Thanks very much.

dubub
 

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Just Picked Mine up Saturday

Also in NJ and coming from a hardtail. Same bike, XL. Just swapped out the pedals to Times and waiting to ride. Make sure you get a shock pump and ask your shop if they can get you a mud flap for the rear shock (I forgot to ask). My LBS warned me that they already sent back a Triad shock to Fox because is was "stuck down", which I also read about on this site, so I'm almost expecting it to happen. Also, refer to the Stumpjumper manual for the rear shock setting chart. Mine came with a manual from Fox, but it did not include the Triad in its contents.

The bike is sweet. I hope to get out this weekend and beat it up a bit. Buying a new bike in the dead of winter is a bit of a tease, but I would have spent the cash on something practical like clothes and food for my kids if I waited too long.

Enjoy.

Mike
 

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I have a '05 and dig it. I would recommend lock on grips and the mud flap for the rear shock for now. Set up the suspension and go ride. You may find a thing or two to change, or you may not. The stuck down shock seems to happen on the Fox shocks. If it occurs, send it back, or send it to Push Industries for a custom valving rebuild. My Septune is there now and I can't wait to get it back and ride.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Mike679 said:
Also in NJ and coming from a hardtail. Same bike, XL. Just swapped out the pedals to Times and waiting to ride. Make sure you get a shock pump and ask your shop if they can get you a mud flap for the rear shock (I forgot to ask). My LBS warned me that they already sent back a Triad shock to Fox because is was "stuck down", which I also read about on this site, so I'm almost expecting it to happen. Also, refer to the Stumpjumper manual for the rear shock setting chart. Mine came with a manual from Fox, but it did not include the Triad in its contents.

The bike is sweet. I hope to get out this weekend and beat it up a bit. Buying a new bike in the dead of winter is a bit of a tease, but I would have spent the cash on something practical like clothes and food for my kids if I waited too long.

Enjoy.

Mike
Mike:
Thanks for the advice about the mud flap - I didn't know about that.
I know what you mean about the "tease."
But the money was sitting there, and, like you, I would have found another home
for it if I didn't pull the trigger.
I'm gonna pick up some cold weather gear and go for it.
 

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Hey Dub,

I've had both a 2004 SJ expert & 2005 S-works stumpy,( the 'new' frame style like you're getting w/ the Triad).
a few things I've learned:
1) watch the front Skewer-spesh uses their own hub & QR up front, and it likes to come loose during a ride-esp the agressive rides w/ some jumps. It never actually allowed the wheel to come off, but I have to check it several times on a ride.
2)bring a multi-tool always. The bolt that secures the shock to the link worked loose on my first ride on the S-works. Only noticed it b/c I was riding hard & was doing a trailside check on the bike.
3) I DO NOT recommed using a hose to wash your bike off. The sales mgr @ the shop told me this like 2 years ago (he rides spesh bikes personally). Now, my 04 bearings are shot-and I've only put about 600 miles on that bike, so it isn't from use. I opened all the pivots last week, and the bearings & the threads of the pivot screws had green oxidation all over them. I've heard people using Finish line bikewash (waterless) having good results.

Remember, a FS bike is more maint than your hardtail. You have to give a bit more TLC, but IMO, it pays off w/ the ride quality & stoopid grin factor a FS bike gives!
Have fun w/ that new ride,

Jdub
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
RobG said:
I have a '05 and dig it. I would recommend lock on grips and the mud flap for the rear shock for now. Set up the suspension and go ride. You may find a thing or two to change, or you may not. The stuck down shock seems to happen on the Fox shocks. If it occurs, send it back, or send it to Push Industries for a custom valving rebuild. My Septune is there now and I can't wait to get it back and ride.
RobG:

That's two recommendations for the mud flap - I definitely will do that.

You recommend "lock-on" grips. I hadn't heard of them until you mentioned them.
I did a quick search - is the reason for going with a "lock-on" grip is that they provide an ability to readily change shifters and that they are generally a "higher end" product than the standard grips so that they will provide more comfort and/or a better grip?
Can you offer any recommendations about which lock-on grip to get?

I've seen several references to "Push Industries;" everyone seems quite pleased with what they can do.
Is there any benefit to getting the Push treatment pre-emptively; that is, does the "Push" treatment actually improve the performance of the shock, or simply make it more robust and trouble free?

Thanks very much for your advice.

Dubub
 

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Biker75 said:
3) I DO NOT recommed using a hose to wash your bike off. The sales mgr @ the shop told me this like 2 years ago (he rides spesh bikes personally). Now, my 04 bearings are shot-and I've only put about 600 miles on that bike, so it isn't from use. I opened all the pivots last week, and the bearings & the threads of the pivot screws had green oxidation all over them. I've heard people using Finish line bikewash (waterless) having good results.
Same bike - same problem. I put a lot of miles on mine however, but most of the suspension bearings were frozen and I never used a "high-pressure" washer of any kind. I think 2 years is all you can expect out of any bearings on any bike. BTW, the green stuff on the pivot bolts might be the loc-tite. I had the same stuff on mine, and also on the disc brake rotor bolts.
 

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Been riding my '06 SJ FSR Expert (XL) for about two months now. Generally an excellent XC bike, but you asked for some pointers so...

- Check all suspension bolts, and torque them to proper specs. I had issues here, but once rectified, all has been well. FOLLOW TORQUE SPECS CAREFULLY!

- Watch the seatpost. Mine was very prone to slipping, and I swapped it out.

- Take the tubes out of the tires and liberally apply baby powder! My inner tubes were literally glued to the inside of the tires. I had to peel them apart.

- Get the mud flap. Do not hesitate!

That's it. You should really enjoy the bike.

Michael

P.S. I haven't had the infamous stuck-down issue, and this is my second RP3-equipped bike. Hopefully you won't either.
 

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Before you drop $16 on a mudflap, check out this
http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=42293
Mine is the last one on the thread.

Recommendations:
Lock-on grips. They are easier to take on and off and they don't spin on the bar when wet.
I changed my seat for a WTB Rocket Team.
Pedals, unless you like Shimano.
Tighten the shock link when you get the bike home from the LBS.
Add more air to the Triad than the manual states. I weigh 200# but I am running 220psi.
The Adrenalines are awesome tires, keep them.

BTW, I have had my bike 1 1/2 months and my Triad is blown. All the oil spewed out onto the bike. I am still riding the bike because I can't let go of my pride and joy for 2 to 3 weeks while they send the shock back.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Jdub,Craig,Michael, and Lumbee1

Thanks for all the great advice guys, I really appreciate it.
The shock pump is a given; beyond that, it looks like I'll get, at a minimum:
1. lock on grips;
2. mudflaps; and
3. a torque wrench

Is there one particular bike maintenance manual that I should pick up?

Best,
Dubub
 

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Can you offer any recommendations about which lock-on grip to get?
I use Oury lock-ons, but most out there seem to be great.

Is there any benefit to getting the Push treatment pre-emptively; that is, does the "Push" treatment actually improve the performance of the shock, or simply make it more robust and trouble free?
Push will set up your shock/fork for your weight and riding style. Do you need to? No, but from those who have used them have nothing but rave reviews afterwards. I am sure I will rave as well.

I guess I am lucky because I have had none of the issues the others reported. I wash my bike with a hose, but am careful around bushings/bearings and such. I have 500 or so miles and the rear suspension is smooth as silk.

http://www.parktool.com/repair_help/index.shtml, is a great site for repairs and maintenance.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Lumbee1 and RobG

Lumbee1: Thanks for the scoop on the Zinn maintenance book. I'm getting it.
RobG: Great recommendation on the Parktool site.
Between these two resources, I'm set. And I figure anything that I screw up, my LBS can fix!

Based on the multiple recommendations regarding rear shock protector and grips,
I'm ordering the "Shock Jacket" from Gebali and ODI rogue grips.

So, I picked up my bike today.
Man does that silver/grey color look great ... I can't wait to get it dirty! :D

Thanks again to everyone for their time and sage advice.

Dubub
(pronounced "WB")
 

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You Ride it Yet?

I got out to Round Valley this morning for a maiden voyage and enjoyed a three-hour ride.

One thing I found out immediately was that I needed more pressure in the rear shock (left the pump at home, though). Also going to put a bit more up front. Mid-ride I clicked the front down to about 100mm as Round Valley is a bit intense with the climbs. I left the rear in Pro-pedal to try and compensate for the lack of psi.

I think as a former hardtail riding pedal masher I'm going to need to refine my spin, but can't wait to ride again after I dial the suspension it a bit.

Mike
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Mike679 said:
I got out to Round Valley this morning for a maiden voyage and enjoyed a three-hour ride.

One thing I found out immediately was that I needed more pressure in the rear shock (left the pump at home, though). Also going to put a bit more up front. Mid-ride I clicked the front down to about 100mm as Round Valley is a bit intense with the climbs. I left the rear in Pro-pedal to try and compensate for the lack of psi.

I think as a former hardtail riding pedal masher I'm going to need to refine my spin, but can't wait to ride again after I dial the suspension it a bit.

Mike
Hey Mike:
Thanks for asking - I finally got my first ride in on Sunday (Hartshorne).
I think that, like you, I needed to go to higher pressure in the rear and maybe drop the front travel to 4 inches.

That said, I'm so inexperienced with dual suspension, I'm not sure what, if anything, I ought to do. I need to experiment.

While I was formerly able to ride in Hartshorne fairly hard for about 2 hrs in the middle ring on my HT, I wasn't close to that on my first day out on my new ride. I was out for about 1.5 hrs and covered a lot less ground.
Of course, I'm down from riding 3x per week to about 4x in the last 8 weeks and up 10 lbs (never mind the additional few pounds on the bike and decreased peddling efficiency).

Also, like you, I need to refine my spin. I found that when I concentrated on
"turning circles," I seemed to move more efficiently.

All in all it was a little disconcerting, but I'm sure I'll get it back and, of course, the downhills make it all worthwhile! I left smiling. :D

I'll probably go out again on Tuesday.

Best,
Dubub.
 

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dubub said:
Hey Mike:
Thanks for asking - I finally got my first ride in on Sunday (Hartshorne).
I think that, like you, I needed to go to higher pressure in the rear and maybe drop the front travel to 4 inches.

That said, I'm so inexperienced with dual suspension, I'm not sure what, if anything, I ought to do. I need to experiment.

While I was formerly able to ride in Hartshorne fairly hard for about 2 hrs in the middle ring on my HT, I wasn't close to that on my first day out on my new ride. I was out for about 1.5 hrs and covered a lot less ground.
Of course, I'm down from riding 3x per week to about 4x in the last 8 weeks and up 10 lbs (never mind the additional few pounds on the bike and decreased peddling efficiency).

Also, like you, I need to refine my spin. I found that when I concentrated on
"turning circles," I seemed to move more efficiently.

All in all it was a little disconcerting, but I'm sure I'll get it back and, of course, the downhills make it all worthwhile! I left smiling. :D

I'll probably go out again on Tuesday.

Best,
Dubub.
I came from a efficient dual suspension bike. The Stumpy rides a little sloppy IMO using the recommended shock values. I didn't have so much problem with the fork but I run the rear shock 20psi more than recommended for my weight.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Excellent Advice Lumbee1

Lumbee1 said:
I came from a efficient dual suspension bike. The Stumpy rides a little sloppy IMO using the recommended shock values. I didn't have so much problem with the fork but I run the rear shock 20psi more than recommended for my weight.
I went for my second ride today, but not before I upped the pressure 20 psi as per your recommendation.
I much preferred the feel of the bike with the extra 20 pounds of pressure.
Thank you!

I thought the seat was comfortable before I upped the pressure.
After doing so, I think I'll follow one of your other recommendations - new seat.
I have a WTB on my hard tail; I'll probably go that way again.

I did much better today. I guess it will just take a little time to get the
bike dialed in.

Dubub
 

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the shock pressures are a start, you should concentrate more on the recommended sag
(usually around 1/2" - 5/8) it will say in the manual. sag is the amount the shock shaft compresses into the shock body when you sit on it. more sag = softer ride but you don't want to bottom out either. If your shock has rebound control you'll have to play around with it as its trial & error. the rebound controls how fast your shock bounces back. Too fast and it will feel like you're getting bucked off on rough trails.
Wtb makes a great saddle and specialized does too. I've found the key to a good feeling saddle is the rear width. the specialized dealers have a butt measurer (no kidding) you sit on it and your butt bones make an impression. then you'll know what size seat will feel good. Most seats only come in one width but it varies, specialized makes a couple of saddles that come in different widths. If you like the wtb go on their web site and see what width it is I think the Pure model is 140mm
 

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dan0 said:
the shock pressures are a start, you should concentrate more on the recommended sag
(usually around 1/2" - 5/8) it will say in the manual. sag is the amount the shock shaft compresses into the shock body when you sit on it. more sag = softer ride but you don't want to bottom out either. If your shock has rebound control you'll have to play around with it as its trial & error. the rebound controls how fast your shock bounces back. Too fast and it will feel like you're getting bucked off on rough trails.
Wtb makes a great saddle and specialized does too. I've found the key to a good feeling saddle is the rear width. the specialized dealers have a butt measurer (no kidding) you sit on it and your butt bones make an impression. then you'll know what size seat will feel good. Most seats only come in one width but it varies, specialized makes a couple of saddles that come in different widths. If you like the wtb go on their web site and see what width it is I think the Pure model is 140mm
Dan, the Spec seat was awful. It was as hard as a rock and very uncomfortable for more than 5 minutes. I tried a WTB SpeedV Team first. I liked the seat a lot but I really wanted the whale tail of the Rocket. Performance featured the RocketV SE (Team version for Performance) for $55 with .99 cent shipping, and I jumped on it immediately. I kept both seats for about a week for comparison. I thought the SpeedV was great but the Rocket one hands down. The RocketV has a kevlar skin, squared whale tail, titanium rails, 280g, a slimmer profile for technical work, and it was more comfort to spin on.

BTW, thanks Performance for the excellent return policy :)
 
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