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· rth009
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've got a very worn rotor on the front of my trail bike. Im trying to get a new rotor before I leave on a planned riding trip. Shop told me not to put a a new set of pads on until I got the new rotor, but if I dont get the new rotor in time, why shouldn't I just put a new set of pads on ride it?
 

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I've got a very worn rotor on the front of my trail bike. Im trying to get a new rotor before I leave on a planned riding trip. Shop told me not to put a a new set of pads on until I got the new rotor, but if I dont get the new rotor in time, why shouldn't I just put a new set of pads on ride it?
Not a problem but the pads will likely take a set and wear into the old wear marks. You will need to sand them flat if you want to pair with a new rotor.
 

· rth009
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks very much. That's exactly what I was thinking. The rotor is worn badly, but it was riding just fine on a 3500' descent the day before the mechs noticed the worn rotor/pads while the bike was in the shop for other work.
 

· rth009
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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
Bicycle rotors do not wear out.
Hmm . . . not so sure about this. My understanding (from wearing out MTB disc brake rotors previously) is that rotors get worn and gradually decrease in thickness until they need to be replaced, or at least should be replaced.

The initial reason for the post was that the mech--who is knowledgeable and trustworthy--told me not to put new pads on an old rotor and just wait for the new rotor, but I wanted to avoid downtime and didnt care if I wasted a set of brake pads by using them with a worn rotor.
 

· rth009
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Why not use the old stuff, if you didn't notice it?
Otherwise, put the pads on and ride. Or put the good disc/pads up front if it isn't already.
I hadnt noticed it yet, but I would have on the next ride, that 3500' descent roached the pads to where it was metal backplate on rotor on one side. Different size rotors (200mm front/180 back) so I cant put the good rotor on the front without finding the right adapters.

Hopefully I'll get the rotor soon, but if I dont before I leave I'll put the new pads and use that old rotor for as long as I can.

Thanks for the advice, all.
 

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If it was down to metal backing and the rotors (which do wear out) measured too thin, i would at all costs avoid putting the new pads on those rotors. Only if desperate.
Where you going on trip? You could possibly buy rotors there?
Before covid, we used to take an annual trip to Whistler and my habit was to buy new rotor and pads on route in WA at fave bikeshop and slap them on when arrive and go ride!
Good chance your rotors are roached and pads might wear funny.
 

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I've got a very worn rotor on the front of my trail bike. Im trying to get a new rotor before I leave on a planned riding trip. Shop told me not to put a a new set of pads on until I got the new rotor, but if I dont get the new rotor in time, why shouldn't I just put a new set of pads on ride it?
Does the place you are headed have a bicycle shop?
Call ahead and check stock or have them order it if they can tell you it arrives on time. Swing by the shop for the rotor to be installed and enjoy your trip.
 

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Because its a 200mm centerlock, which they didnt have, and they could not get one until next week.
I think it might be a good idea to check ahead where you're going and see if they have a rotor you could buy. If so, I'd hold off on putting in the new pads until it is on. Then return/cancel the one on order. That way, you'll have a nice new set up for your trip and not run the minimal risk of complicating things with pads used on bad rotors....as Forest Rider suggests.
 

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See if you can get the rotor re-routed to your destination. Or to a post office, UPS or Fedex location at your destination.
Thru hikers and Touring cyclists send supplies to local post offices for pickup.
General delivery to post office info below. Info from a sectionhiker.com

General Delivery in the United States
In the US, hikers sending mail drops to post offices should label the outside of their box with the following information.
  • Your Name
  • General Delivery
  • City, State
  • Post Office Zip Code(5) "- 9999"
The 9999 at the end of the zip code tells the automated mail sorters that your package is General Delivery. Note that General Delivery works best for small towns that just have one post office. In larger towns and cities, packages may be forwarded to a larger post office for holding and pickup. When in doubt, call ahead and ask what the local practice is. Also, make sure you put a return address on your boxes. If you decide to not pick it up or it goes astray and you can't find it in a big city, the postal service will send it back to you.

Proper identification will be required to pick up your box so make sure to bring a drivers license or passport.
 
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