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When is a 37mm seat clamp not 37mm? (when it is Orbea).
A 36.5 seat clamp from a Trek fit perfect.
My mechanic suggested this as Trek also uses a 31.6 seatpost on their carbon mtb frames.
That's good that you've got it sorted.:)

It's strange that Orbea would be so unspecific about the seatpost clamp sizing saying 37mm diameter (also Hypersprite's post above where the part was labelled as 34.9mm on the order for a seatpost clamp that isn't 34.9mm diameter and wouldn't fit if it was 34.9mm diameter) when it isn't. I don't know why Orbea would do that.

The Bontrager Trek seatpost clamps are 36.4mm according to the website:

https://www.trekbikes.com/gb/en_GB/...ies/bontrager-premium-seatpost-clamp/p/25870/

On that Hope aftermarket seatpost clamp link the available sizes are Size 28.6, 30, 31.8, 34.9, 36.4 and 38.5mm diameter so those are likely to be the most common seatpost clamp sizes for the vast majority of frames I'd have thought.
 

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Imagine a hypothetical scenario, where say a few weeks ago, the bike fell into a lake whilst being photographed. I suppose if it had happened - it did not - there might also be a drop or two of water reaching the seatpost.

Guess I'll be servicing it then. :eekster:
In normal riding a bicycle frame is nowhere near watertight. Just riding in heavy rain is enough for water to be able to get inside the frame through the open holes (cable ports, around the headset, bottle cage rivnuts etc) and that includes the seatpost hole. Even with a seatpost fitted water can seep down the tiny gap that exists between the frame and seatpost down into the frame. Water isn't going to damage the carbon fibre frame but they can get surprising amounts of water inside from riding in the rain.

It's why if you turn the bike over there are drain holes drilled underneath the bottom bracket shell and also the swingarm. The drain holes allow water to escape instead of pooling inside the lowest points of the frame and being trapped there.

If - purely hypthetically - the bike fell into a lake and was fully submerged then that would get water into parts that normally would be fairly well protected from just spray and rain. For the dropper post if fully submerged water could potentially have got inside the dropper cable housing which could rust the cable causing it to stick after a few weeks.

In that purely hypothetical scenario it would be worth removing the chainset off the bike, even weeks later, and making sure there's not water inside the bottom bracket, as well as checking the headset bearings, before putting fresh grease round them.:)
 

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We had some snow and I have been on my fatbike with GX Eagle the last three rides. First shifting out of the driveway and I thought I'd turn around and remove the XT/XTR of my Oiz. I barely had to touch the shifter lever to shift on my fatbike, whereas the force needed to actuate the lever was giving me thumb joint issues on my Oiz. I was doing some maintenance and thought that can't be right, needing so much force to shift. I put it to the test by routing the cable through a new cable housing, directly from trigger to rear mech, entirely bypassing the frame. It was waaaayyy better. It is still harder to push than the SRAM trigger, but nothing that I think would concern me. I conclude that there may be an isse with the routing through my frame. I have the Park Tool cable routing tool, which is really absolutely brilliant. My only concern is with that brain-dead design of the clamping on the chainstay that WR304 has documented. I hope it will work out to just loosen the screw enough to move the cable and not loose the nut inside the chainstay.
 

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I have loosened the cable housing clamps, but the housing wouldn't move at all at the chainstay end. Threads of the screw were visible and the washer is loose as well. I inserted the Allen key and tapped it lightly with a small hammer to loosen things up. I can now move the housing a little. As much as I love the bike, this way of clamping is the dumbest thing to be found on any of my bikes. It even beats that chain guide, which comes in second. Argh.
 

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I have loosened the cable housing clamps, but the housing wouldn't move at all at the chainstay end. Threads of the screw were visible and the washer is loose as well. I inserted the Allen key and tapped it lightly with a small hammer to loosen things up. I can now move the housing a little. As much as I love the bike, this way of clamping is the dumbest thing to be found on any of my bikes. It even beats that chain guide, which comes in second. Argh.
Have you tried removing the chain guide from the bike althogether? I think that it could possibly catch on the internal gear cable housing where it screws into the frame.

If you can get some tension on the gear cable housing tapping the end of the cable housing with a rubber mallet will push it through the tight section of chainstay. On my bike I cut the gear cable housing and then knocked that section out with a rubber mallet.:)
 

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No, not recently. Last time I removed it was when I was cleaning the bottom bracket. I have routed the cable through the original housing again after working it loose some more. I'd say it is better now, but I was only in the workshop. My thumb joint is hurting at the moment, but I guess it will find out if it truly improved when I get to ride again and when it stopped hurting. If not, I'll try your mallet approach to get it out (good idea!) and continue from there. I am not even ruling out going wireless or even grip shift as final solution.
 

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No, not recently. Last time I removed it was when I was cleaning the bottom bracket. I have routed the cable through the original housing again after working it loose some more. I'd say it is better now, but I was only in the workshop. My thumb joint is hurting at the moment, but I guess it will find out if it truly improved when I get to ride again and when it stopped hurting. If not, I'll try your mallet approach to get it out (good idea!) and continue from there. I am not even ruling out going wireless or even grip shift as final solution.
My 2019 Oiz is full XTR and it shifts very easily. The shifting force is much less than my other bike with Sram XO shifter. Just wanted to give you another data point. Good luck.
 

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Thanks, good to know! We're having snow and rain today, so I opted for lifting instead of riding. A friend of mine also has an Oiz with XT/XTR. It's a bit of a drive to get to his place though and I think it will be a while until it is safe to meet again. When it is, I will also try his shifting for comparison.
 

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No, not recently. Last time I removed it was when I was cleaning the bottom bracket. I have routed the cable through the original housing again after working it loose some more. I'd say it is better now, but I was only in the workshop. My thumb joint is hurting at the moment, but I guess it will find out if it truly improved when I get to ride again and when it stopped hurting. If not, I'll try your mallet approach to get it out (good idea!) and continue from there. I am not even ruling out going wireless or even grip shift as final solution.
I have look after 5 XTR Oiz's and for some reason the shifting will just be stiff for some reason on some of the bikes. I do everything the same (I think) but one bike shifts stiff.

I switched to Shimano XTR cables and housing on all the bikes and that stuff is amazingly smooth.
 

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Just stopped by to say I'm 95% considering ordering my wife her new trail bike in 120mm front and back. I wish the MyO custmizing allowed for more choises but I suppose beggars can't be choosers. Either the ..

1. OIZ M Pro Tr for ~ $6087 and selling off parts so I can turn it into AXS shifting with carbon wheels.
2. OIZ OMX frame + Shock for ~$3799

Expensive, I know, but I'm tired of my normal chiner go-tos and lack of innovation.
 

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No, not recently. Last time I removed it was when I was cleaning the bottom bracket. I have routed the cable through the original housing again after working it loose some more. I'd say it is better now, but I was only in the workshop. My thumb joint is hurting at the moment, but I guess it will find out if it truly improved when I get to ride again and when it stopped hurting. If not, I'll try your mallet approach to get it out (good idea!) and continue from there. I am not even ruling out going wireless or even grip shift as final solution.
My 2020 Orbea Oiz originally came with a full Shimano XTR M9100 groupset.

Using the internally routed cable shifting the XTR M9100 worked ok. It wasn't bad at all. I only replaced it because the XTR M9100 trigger shifter failed.:madman:

Could be worse, e.g. S-Works Epic ;)
There were two big price hikes by Specialized UK this year, including an across the board 12% increase in November 2020. The 2021 Specialized S-Works Epic (SRAM AXS) was expensive to begin with but is up to a list price of £11,500 GBP now.

https://www.specialized.com/gb/en/s-works-epic/p/175233?color=281542-175233&searchText=97620-0102

For comparison the equivalent top spec 2021 Orbea Oiz M LTD (SRAM AXS) has a list price of £7,699 GBP, which is £3,801 GBP cheaper. (33% less).

https://www.orbea.com/gb-en/bicycles/mountain/oiz/cat/oiz-m-ltd

It's quite possible the Orbea price will go up too (Brexit, coronavirus etc) but as it is I think Specialized are pricing themselves out of the market for many potential buyers.
 

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Handlebar/Stem/Dropper Weights

Anyone benchmark the OC2 Dropper and OC3 Stem and Handlebar weights yet? The finish on these parts seems pretty nice, but I didn't take the time to get a weight before heading out to ride my new Oiz.

The bar is 760mm wide, but, at least with the stock grips, feels very rigid.

The bike is a joy to ride though! I'm trying to get as many cold rides in as I can before winter really sets in here in New England.

I have the 150mm dropper and the 75mm stem.
 

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My 2020 Orbea Oiz M Team


I've have raced and trained on this bike since april - finally found time to take some pictures.




TR version with 120/120mm. Size M. Weight as pictured 9,5kg(20,9lbs). 9,75kg with dropper

I have replaced wheels with lighter and wider (30mm id) ones and threw out the awful fox suspension and replaced it with new 35mm Sid and Sidluxe.
2021 Sid's are so good that I dont need remote lockout anymore. They offer very good support on ascents, ride high and still have amazing small bump compliance.
And most importantly - they don't overheat!! - suspension sensitivity stays the same after 30min or after 8 hours.

Actually I did ran 80mm dropper seatpost all summer - I just bought a trail bike for winter and moved the post there but probably move it back because I installed 125mm for trail bike.

Current stem is 90mm and -6 with 3mm spacer underneath. I did experiment with 80mm stem - didn't like it on ascents and fast sections - probably will use original 90mm -12degree FSA next summer - makes bike faster.
And 32 chaingring is also part of "autumn setup" - used 34 in summer but will try 36 for next year.
Of course I have broken the rear suspension bolt as everybody - replaced it with steel one and all is good.

I think it is possible to make very very fast trail bike out if this if you are lighter rider so you don't break the light frame when jumping:
different tires and wheels, 32t chainring, 70mm stem, 15mm riser bars and 130mm RS pike - for example.
 

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Has anyone used a Oneup EDC tool in the steerer on the new Oiz? I wasn't sure how that would work with the teardrop shaped top cap/stem.
 

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I have the new XTR cable housing. The stock housing was damaged where it was clamped at the chainstay.

1907626


There's a washer in the clamping assembly, which has a cutout for the housing. I suspect that the washer wasn't correctly aligned during the installation which caused this damage. I am optimistic that shifting will be much easier now that the damaged housing is removed. I have routed the new housing, but I haven't completed the assembly. Currently the bike is inside waiting for the chainstay to dry. Turns out there was a bit of water inside.
About the clamping... WR304 already warned about the possibility of loosing the nut in the chainstay. I'd like to add that when it is loosened, the clamping assembly can be pulled out of the chainstay as a whole. To loosen it, the screw must be untightened, obviously not all the way out, and then the housing must be loosened as well. The latter can be done by pushing on the rear end and pulling on the BB-end of the housing. Once the clamping friction is overcome by doing this, the whole clamping mechanism can be pulled out of the chainstay. After routing the new housing, it can be pushed back in and tightened again.

There's a bunch of extra pieces that came with the XTR shifting kit. I have no idea what they are for. 🤔

1907628
 

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Has anyone used a Oneup EDC tool in the steerer on the new Oiz? I wasn't sure how that would work with the teardrop shaped top cap/stem.
There's a picture of the new Orbea OMX teardrop spacers here.



The Oneup EDC tool (both the new and old versions) needs a round spacer for the top compression section to fasten down onto. The teardrop spacers that come with the new style stem look like they would be ok as they are actually a flat surface so would be compatible.:)








1908419
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New EDC Lite
OneUp Announces EDC Lite, A 9-Function Steerer Tube Tool - Pinkbike

Original EDC Tool
 

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I have the new XTR cable housing. The stock housing was damaged where it was clamped at the chainstay.
...
There's a bunch of extra pieces that came with the XTR shifting kit. I have no idea what they are for. 🤔
Having a damaged gear cable housing wouldn't help with the shifting!

Those rubber end caps are if you have a bike with split cable housing, rather than a single long run. They thread onto the end of the cable to act as a seal to try and stop moisture getting into the cable housing run. This picture shows how they fit (the rubber end cap would be pushed right down onto the end of the cable when fully installed)

1908420
 

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Ok, thanks, never seen those rubber end caps before! I installed the cable today and it feels much better! We have got about 50 cm of powder snow today. It'll be hard on the fatbike and it'll definitely be a while before I can ride the Oiz again and see how I like the new shifting.
 
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