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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
So, let me preface this by saying that I sold my 21" Inbred 29er frame and got this 19" RL MC 29er frame to replace it. (don't tell Brant:eek: )

Some would say it's a downgrade, but I believe the MC suits me better. For one, I wanted to run a dinglespeed setup (dual chainrings/cogs) and the sliding dropouts on the Inbred made the change over too complicated, or at least, moreso than I cared to deal with, what with the sliding dropouts and all.

The fork ends on the MC were just what i was looking for to better facilitate the double speed setup. Other reasons were that I felt the 21" Inbred to be just a bit big to properly manhandle (pre 19.5"), and also I bit flexy, being that I'm about 200 lbs.(I'm about 6'2", so I'm not a total fatass:p ). Don't get me wrong, I loved the Inbred, killer frame, great ride. But I could feel, and actually see, the BB swaying back and forth when I was out of the saddle, good for compliance I suppose, but bad for singlespeed efficiency.

Now for the Monocog (Duocog?:skep: )...
I built it with many of the components scavenged from the Inbred;
My beloved old-school White Industries 180mm forged cranks,
Avid BB7's w/ Speed Dial levers,
Salsa Moto Ace riser,
Truvativ Team 100mm stem (soon to be swapped for a 110, something black),
Surly 32t chainring and cogs,
WTB steel Exi's
saddle and pedals.

New parts include:
Ritchey Pro seatpost (my Salsa Shaft that I'd been using was too big:madman: )
Salsa Liplock,
Cane Creek S3 Headset,
Shitmano un73 BB,
Salsa 36t chainring,
Bontager Mustang SS wheelset scored off eBay (stock Rig wheelset),
Surly Tugnut.

I think that covers the build.

I've had it to the trails twice since building it up Monday and I can say, Daddy like.
While it's not quite as compliant/plush riding as the Inbred, I can say it's more responsive, lively, snappy. The BB doesn't sway (at least not that I've noticed) under my 200 lbs, this is probably in part due to the chainstay bridge. It's easier to handle in general, though I do attribute some of this to it being slightly smaller in size.

One huge difference is the fork. I loved the On One fork as it definately softened up the front end due to it's flex, which I miss. The Monocog's fork is definately stiffer and less forgiving. Not necessarily a bad thing, but I certainly feel more trail chatter. Steering on the MC seems quicker and more responsive, which I attribute to there being less fork rake and flex. It actually almost got me in trouble a few times because I wasn't used to the increased steering response.

The MC is also easier for me to loft, which I guess has to due to the slighty smaller overall size, and also probably inpart to it being overall more rigid. Not really a weight difference, as the Inbred was about 28 lbs, and the MC as built is about 28 lbs as well.

I know a couple rides isn't much, but so far it seems that as far as a rigid ss 29er goes (which is my only MTB), for my weight and what I want out of the bike, the MC suits me perfectly. And for a $250 frameset, it's unbelievable. Truly.

I kept the Rhyno Lite wheelset that I used for the Inbred outfitted with some Panaracer 37c semi slicks so I can swap out for road use, though I much more enjoy riding my fixie on the roads and around town so I may sell those as well.

Chainrings are 32t Surly (inside) and Salsa 36t. Cogs on the dirt wheels are Surly 22t (inside) and 18t. So with the flip of the QR and a little manipulation of the tugnut, I can go from my 32x22 trail gear, to a more reasonable 36x18 cruising gear. One the road wheels, I have a nutted axle and 18t and 15t surly cogs, so I can change from 32x18, to 36x15 with a couple turns of the wrench. The Wipperman Connex 8spd chain allows for a couple mm variation here and there with no issues. With the dirt wheels, they are towards the front of the dropouts, and the road set sits near the ends so I don't have to fuss with chainlength for the switch. I also have a couple quick links in the chain, so by chainging the length of chain between them I can theoretically run the inside ring to the outside cog, though I havn't yet tried it.

As far as adjusting the rear disc caliper, I don't have to. I can pull the rear wheel, change gears, etc. without having to touch the rear brake. Lucky or talented?:confused:
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 · (Edited)
A coule more pics...

And a few pics of "Road Mode", though like I said, I much prefer riding the fixie on the roads, so I'm thinking I may not use these much and will probably end up selling them. But it shows the potential versatility; one bike for everytihing. if set up right. :thumbsup:

Other than the stem, the only thing i see changing are maybe the bars, I really like Mary bars, though I de-ano'd and trimmed mine to use on my fix. Who's got the cheapest Mary's these days?
 

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nice! i hope to set up a dinglespeed in the future. your pics keep the vision alive.

i will go 30 and 34 up front, 19 and 15 in the back. i just need the 15t cog and i will have the parts. i just need the time.
 

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long hazy daze said:
Yeah, the rings are in the middle and outer positions on the crank spider.
Thanks. It also looks like you are using a Surly Tugnutt on the drive side when running the bike in MTB mode. Is this accurate and so far has it been fine with just the single Tugnutt?

What brand of rear cogs are you using and was spacing an issue with them or was it pretty straightforward to get two decent chanilines for the two gear ratios you are running?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
MMcG said:
Thanks. It also looks like you are using a Surly Tugnutt on the drive side when running the bike in MTB mode. Is this accurate and so far has it been fine with just the single Tugnutt?

What brand of rear cogs are you using and was spacing an issue with them or was it pretty straightforward to get two decent chanilines for the two gear ratios you are running?
Yes. the Tugnut's on the drive side, so I can get the chain to proper tension before I tighten the QR, no tensioner on the left side. I do have to be sure to crank down the QR quite tight however, because if it's not tight enough and you lay into the rear brake, it will pull the wheel backwards in the dropout, leaving it rubbing against the left side chainstay. Not that a tensioner would help that anyway because they keep the axle from pulling forward. The drive side is the only side where a tensioner/tug is necessary anyway IMO, since that's where all the pedaling force is. Once I figured this out,I havn't has any slippage of the QR whatsoever, and that's with some hard braking (just to test) and some heavy uphill hammering. I wasn't sure if a QR would cut it for me or not, but so long as it's tight enough, no issues.

All the cogs in use are Surlys. They are offset so you can flip them around to get different spacing between them. I have the cogs set facing each other, so that the offsets are to the outsides, "spaced" sides turned in. I think I had to use a 2mm spacer between the inside of the cassette body and the cogs on the road set to get them where I need them. The spacing between the cogs is dead on with the spacing of the chainrings, however, on the dirt set, the cogs are about a mm to the outside overall, and about a mm to the inside overall on the road set. It's as close as I can get having the cogs properly spaced and still leaving room for the lockrings.

I even tried swiching the chainrings, the larger on the inside, but things just didn't want to line up right that way. I think partly because the Surly chainrings are thinner that the typical aluminum rings, so that affects the chainline in regard to where the cogs need to be set on the cassete body, and it just didn't really work out that way.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
calzonical said:
Nice looking duo-purpose-steed!

As for the alignment of the Chainrings...How tedeious was it to adjust each chainrings to eliminate excessive sag in the chain?
Not too bad, I just tinkered with it a bit and cranked 'em down. The biggest factor there, at least with using cassette style hubs, is that the cogs will "float" somewhat on the spline. At least this is the case with the Surly cogs. I havn't really messed with any others so I son't know how others are in regards to this. But with the Surlys, when you hit a tight spot, squeeze the chain together a bit the pull the cog. Once you get the cog just about right, you have to tighten down the lockring as tight as you can get it to hold it in that place. If the lockring isn't tight enough, you can hear a click as the cog gets pulled when you hit the thight spot. I've been fiddling with these surly cogs enough that it doesn't take me long at all.

Not sure if that makes any sense, but I hope it helps.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
rockhound said:
For a cheap Mary stand-in, look at the Bontrager Trekking Bar.
Those look pretty sweet, but they only have about half the sweep of the Mary. I've got a cheap riser with a 20deg sweep, and it's not comfortable to me. I really like the Mary's. Though I like the 12 deg Salsa's I'm running now as far as a regular bar goes.

I've developed a theory in regards to big sweep bars. I'm a lifelong drummer and have spent lots of time studying hand techique, position, etc. Never would you see a drummer holding sticks at a 90 deg angle to their forearm (palm down), which is about where most handlebars sit. It's just not natural and neither is it effective or efficient. Drumsticks are typically held at about a 40-50 deg angle to the forearm, (top of the hand up, palm down, parallel to the floor). This position is much more natural and comfortable, and you can derive more power from it. When I ride with a bar such as the mary, the way i grip the bar is much like the way I grip a stick.

Think instead of the handle bar grip running allong the line of the first knuckles of all your fingers. Think of the line starting with the 2nd knuckle of your index finger and coming out the side of your palm, behind the first knuckle of your pinky.

That may not make much sense to many people, but it makes perfect sense to me. And it my just be that I've played for long I'm more accustomed to that kind of hand position.

That being said, I really want another set of Marys. Jones bars are just too damn expensive.
 

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Nice dinglespeed setup. I'm a longtime dinglespeeder myself, so I like it. 30x26 and 34x22 on the Vulture. 36x22 and 40x18 on the KM, which I do both with a singlespeed hub and with a 3-speed.

I'm surprised that you're having such a loose fit with the Surly cogs. Mine's pretty tight (though not as tight as the Endless cogs), and I've never had one loose enough to move around on the hub that much. For that matter, I've never bothered tightening my lockrings beyond hand-tight either.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
GlowBoy said:
Nice dinglespeed setup. I'm a longtime dinglespeeder myself, so I like it. 30x26 and 34x22 on the Vulture. 36x22 and 40x18 on the KM, which I do both with a singlespeed hub and with a 3-speed.

I'm surprised that you're having such a loose fit with the Surly cogs. Mine's pretty tight (though not as tight as the Endless cogs), and I've never had one loose enough to move around on the hub that much. For that matter, I've never bothered tightening my lockrings beyond hand-tight either.
It's not that they fit loosely, but there's just enough play that they can create tight/sag spots unless properly tweaked and tightened down.
I'm wanting to try something else, aluminum-for weight mostly, I was thinking Endless or CK.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Aaahh....

...now that's better.:thumbsup:

If anybody cares.....

Changes include a Ritchy Pro 110 stem, Mary bars, and I changed the 36t salsa ring to a 34t Surly ring, and changes the cogs to a 20t and 18t, now I can run either cog with either chainring. Not huge gearing changes I know, but it's enough for trail use. My set of Bonty XR's, which I actually like a lot, I didn't really give them a fair run when I first got them, but they hook up great and have good enough volume. And not to mention, much lighter than the Exi's. Also changes the saddles, the old one was creaking.

And since I've had a few gnarly crash related injuries the last couple weeks, I thought the Peter Griffin sticker on the top tube was appropriate. It's funny, I havn't had a crash in months......then I had four nasty ones within a week. Three in one day.:rolleyes:

I love the Marys upside down. Feels so natural......
 

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